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Kohli's behaviour towards the journalist was way out of line. But how angry and upset must he have been to even contemplate such a reaction? The media needs to reassess how it represents the players and their loved ones. These are human beings playing under the greatest pressure imaginable in sport, writes Dileep Premachandran.
The media needs to reassess how it represents players and their loved ones. These aren’t walking, talking headlines
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Ashis Ray was interviewed on CNN-IBN in Delhi at the end of last month. Ashis discussed his book, CRICKET WORLD CUP: THE INDIAN CHALLENGE which is available now.
One of the few persons to have witnessed Kapil Dev's historic 175* against Zimbabwe was the celebrated journalist Ashis Ray. He was in India and CNN-IBN's Cricket Editor, Sanjeeb Mukherjea caught up with him to talk about his book 'Cricket World Cup - The Indian Challenge' and his documentary on the 1983 World Cup.<br />
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In a week when one of Ireland’s biggest annual sporting fixtures took place, the Irish cricket team was a mainstay in all major sports bulletins. The Six Nations clash between the Irish rugby team and England was on the minds of most sports fans, but the growth and development of cricket in Ireland was in evidence. Graeme McCoy writes in from Ireland.
The time difference makes watching the World Cup live difficult, yet cricket fever had gripped the country
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Ireland isn't here to make the numbers; the ambition now is to be taken seriously as a cricket nation, writes David Molumby: 
In a week when sporting focus was on a vital 6 Nations rugby game, the country was again gripped by cricket fever
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To look in the eyes of Preston Mommsen was to be confronted with a heartbreak that didn't belong in sport, writes Anand Vasu:
Mommsen’s men would have backed themselves to win, so the regret at an opportunity missed will linger
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India are enjoying their cricket and the practice sessions - full of banter and laughter - reflect that, writes R Kaushik:
Energy and enthusiasm in full display on afternoon of inventive training drills in Perth
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Dreamy. Angry. Flowing hair. Piercing eyes. Majestic on the cricket field. A new-age action hero, the modern-day answer to John Rambo. Meet Afghanistan’s pace spearhead. A maverick on the cricket field if there was one, gentle and thoughtful and almost child-like off it as he speaks about Shah Rukh Khan and Shoaib Akhtar. R Kaushik chats with Shapoor Zadran.
Flowing mane, left-arm over, ferocious on field and gentle off it, Shapoor is as much joy as force of nature
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Ashis Ray, author of CRICKET WORLD CUP: THE INDIAN CHALLENGE launched his book in Melbourne on Friday 20 February. Here is a photo of Ashis presenting copies of his book to Manika Jain, Acting High Commissioner of India in Australia. (Photo courtesy of Pitcher Partners).
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To some extent, Indian players are justified in keeping the media at arm’s length. Facts are twisted and stories concocted from time to time, but it is not difficult to find out who the offenders are. To tar every member of the fraternity with the same brush is both churlish and childish; perhaps they don’t care, but Dhoni and his team have alienated media personnel from all parts of the world.
R Kaushik on insensitivity and indifference:

http://goo.gl/GkLd0I
India's captain and his men are particularly insensitive to the needs of world cricket’s largest media contingent
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A year ago, Zaheer Khan told R Kaushik that Mohammed Shami was "ready". At the 2015 World Cup, the young man thrust into the role of India's spearhead, has shown he is. All-weather, all conditions, all-ball, all Shami.
In Ishant's absence, the pacer has embraced the responsibility of carrying India's young attack in the World Cup
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INTERVIEW: "Teams should watch out - anyone taking India's bowling unit lightly, it's at their own peril," Ravi Shastri speaks to R Kaushik:
Timely break energised India, and anyone taking the bowling lightly does so at their own peril, says team director
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SACHIN #TENDULKAR speaks:
“Being a World Cup ambassador, I’m supposed to be neutral, but my heart says something and my brain says something. So, I’ve got to stick to my heart and support India.” 
Batting legend savours experience of watching the action from the stands, says World Cup will get more competitive
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Wisden Cricketers' Almanack was first published in 1864.
Introduction
John Wisden – “the Little Wonder” – was one of the star cricketers of the mid-19th century: he probably starting selling cricket equipment in 1850, the year he took ten wickets in an innings for North v South at Lord’s. All ten were bowled, a feat which remains unique in first-class cricket.

He soon opened a shop in London and added cigars to his range of goods. Finally, he branched out into publishing and in 1864 produced the first Wisden Cricketers’ Almanack: an eccentric volume of old scores running to just 112 pages.

As it entered the last century, the Almanack dramatically improved to become accepted as the most authoritative record of cricket in Britain and around the world: a little wonder in its own right. It has never missed a year, even during the two world wars. Wherever the game is played, the name Wisden is now synonymous with cricket itself: it is the most famous sports book in the world.

Wisden’s yellow jacket, woodcut logo and front cover title in playbill font give each edition a familiar look. The book is regularly referred to as “the cricketers’ bible” (though not by the publishers) and some devotees regard it as infallible, a view emphatically not shared by Wisden – although the staff go to exceptional lengths to avoid even minor errors.

Each new edition contains more than 1,500 pages, many crammed with scorecards and statistics that some may find forbidding and dry. But devotees know the book is also full of unique and fascinating features, and every page is imbued with the spirit of the Almanack, defined as “accuracy, integrity and independence”.