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UP CLOSE: What does Sachin Tendulkar miss about cricket? Not playing, but the buzz of being out in the middle and a crowd cheering him on, he tells Dileep Premachandran:
“It was fun to play the Lord’s bicentenary game … but there were aches and pains and all that”
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There was no anger, no excuses, just emotions that ran unchecked and utter honesty as a profoundly sad AB de Villiers fronted up after South Africa's semifinal loss to New Zealand, writes Anand Vasu.
“I felt that we left it all out on the field tonight, and that's all I can ask of the guys,” says distraught captain
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NZ v SA PREVIEW: De Villiers, McCullum don't carry baggage. In the World Cup semifinals, New Zealand, South Africa will chart their own history. Anand Vasu previews:
Neither McCullum, nor de Villiers care for past baggage; both sides instead will look to chart their own history
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Inzamam column: "The way Riaz tested Watson, it took me back to the fiery days of Wasim, Waqar and Shoaib" 
Inzamam-ul-Haq: Riaz and pacers were only consolation in disappointing campaign
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A cricket physio’s job is a gruelling one; now, Indians like Sudhaker too are up for the challenge, writes R Kaushik:
A cricket physio’s job is a gruelling one; now, Indians like Sudhaker too are up for the challenge
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A small step for Paras Khadka, a giant leap for cricket in Nepal: http://goo.gl/zm4OJE
A few months ago, walking the streets of London, Khadka walked in to Lord's. He walked out after a meeting with Mike Gatting and John Stephenson, and the start of a brighter future for his country. Sidhanta Patnaik has the story:
Cricketer's initiative set to reap rich dividends as he becomes the first from his country to represent MCC
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Our friends at Cricket Web reviewed Ashis Ray's CRICKET WORLD CUP: THE INDIAN CHALLENGE.

"What Ray does not do is hedge his bets. There are no ‘perhaps’, ‘may’, or ‘could’ – his opinions are shot straight from the hip and strike right between his quarry’s eyes."

Read the review via the link below.
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AUS v IND: On Monday, Duncan Fletcher had a tennis racquet in hand, hammering down balls at various heights and speeds. Every top-order batsman had a stint at the tennis ball nets, India not obsessing over the short ball but making sure that they didn’t leave any stone unturned in their preparation, writes R Kaushik after watching India's practice session: http://goo.gl/VWg1A8
In an intense session, Raina and Fletcher led the way while the Indians practiced with tennis balls and rackets
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What does a guitar solo have in common with the Cricket World Cup? Manoj Narayan charts the growth of the sport's showpiece event, from modest beginnings to golden bats and diamond-studded balls, and now a wise, middle-aged man of 40: http://goo.gl/gS2xMr
From modest beginnings in 1975, cricket’s showpiece event is now attracting the moolah by the millions
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In Adelaide, it was the survival of the luckiest. Geoff Lemon on Watson, Maxwell and making opportunities count: 
Watson and Maxwell were dropped off Riaz early on – both critically important to the batsmen in question
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JAVAGAL SRINATH COLUMN:

"The Indian batsmen realised quickly that this was not one of those days when 100 in the first ten or even 15 overs was going to be possible, as used to be the norm against Bangladesh, owing to the sheer quality in the bowling. The adjustments to the scoring pattern were made accordingly, which is always a sign of a good team."
Srinath: Moderation in approach paid Rohit dividends and has perhaps set him up for bigger challenges
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FEATURE: Who does the World Cup belong to? A CEO, a media manager, a cricketer, the Postman and countless others, finds Anand Vasu: 
At every turn of the tournament is an unnamed warrior giving more to the tournament than he is taking from it
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Wisden Cricketers' Almanack was first published in 1864.
Introduction
John Wisden – “the Little Wonder” – was one of the star cricketers of the mid-19th century: he probably starting selling cricket equipment in 1850, the year he took ten wickets in an innings for North v South at Lord’s. All ten were bowled, a feat which remains unique in first-class cricket.

He soon opened a shop in London and added cigars to his range of goods. Finally, he branched out into publishing and in 1864 produced the first Wisden Cricketers’ Almanack: an eccentric volume of old scores running to just 112 pages.

As it entered the last century, the Almanack dramatically improved to become accepted as the most authoritative record of cricket in Britain and around the world: a little wonder in its own right. It has never missed a year, even during the two world wars. Wherever the game is played, the name Wisden is now synonymous with cricket itself: it is the most famous sports book in the world.

Wisden’s yellow jacket, woodcut logo and front cover title in playbill font give each edition a familiar look. The book is regularly referred to as “the cricketers’ bible” (though not by the publishers) and some devotees regard it as infallible, a view emphatically not shared by Wisden – although the staff go to exceptional lengths to avoid even minor errors.

Each new edition contains more than 1,500 pages, many crammed with scorecards and statistics that some may find forbidding and dry. But devotees know the book is also full of unique and fascinating features, and every page is imbued with the spirit of the Almanack, defined as “accuracy, integrity and independence”.