Profile cover photo
Profile photo
William Collins
Spray Sealants Blog
Spray Sealants Blog
About
Posts

Post has attachment
This is a very good video by Robert Naini, the Spray Foam Advisor about using spray foam in metal buildings. My only disagreement with him is that when it comes to agricultural barns and buildings, there can be significant energy savings. We have validated 20%-40% energy savings for more than 10 years during our work in the ag/poultry business. www.ag-tite.com
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Cost of Spray Foam Insulation for Existing Houses
Improvement.com and HomeAdvisor.com 2017
by SpraySealants

I ran across an article which was published recently and it stirred up my curiosity regarding what the average cost of a spray foam project could be for an average existing home. This lead me to several very interesting sources, one of which I am sure you have heard of. Both Improvenet and HomeAdvisor publish some very interesting data.

National Install Spray Foam Insulation Costs
Cost data is based on actual project costs as reported by ImproveNet members.
Average reported cost based on 694 cost profiles
Minimum cost @ $150
Maximum cost @ $6,500
Most homeowners spent between:
$1,623 To $2692

You Can See The Actual Chart At This Link



Like any project or insulation type, the specific cost of spray insulation varies greatly according to the size of your home or room. There’s more to applying spray foam insulation, however, because you may need your installer to add more than one layer of insulation to meet your home’s energy needs. Each layer of spray foam is one inch thick, and most spray foam insulation installation prices are based on the number of layers of one inch of foam you need in a given space.

So how did they get this this data? It turns out that homeowners visit ImproveNet.com to find a top-rated pro to complete their home improvement project or repair. Once their projects are completed, the members log in to their accounts and complete a short cost survey. After compiling and organizing the data, ImproveNet.com then issues the report on their websites so that people can get a feel for what to expect to a project like this.

While I recognize that this information is extremely unscientific, it does lead to some very interesting questions:

What type of portable spray foam equipment did the contractor use for these types of projects?
Did the contractor make any money or did they do this in conjunction with adding other types of insulation?
What type of contractor was this? Are we talking insulation contractor? Spray foam contractor? General contractor?
Did this lead to additional business opportunities for the contractor?
So many times it seems that spray foam for existing home retrofitting is used much more as a band-aide than as a leading technology. Granted, nothing in the insulation material space is very sexy and no one thinks about things like leaking air unless some type of professional is able to make the case for solving the issue, but just maybe there is an opportunity for a portable spray foam system that could allow contractors to take advantage of these opportunities, especially of the they can get in and out of the project quickly and without a high capital cost.
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
For more than 40 years, if you were using can foam to air seal your project, you really only had two choices as to how to apply the air sealant. The first way would be for you to use a manual gun that you would load a 24 oz pressurize can onto and then you could apply a bead to fill cracks or joints. Your other option would be to use a Foam Kit that would provide a plastic foam gun and with that system you would be able to apply the foam in a spray pattern. Even then, you you would need to interchange nozzles onto the gun so that you could get the right type of pattern that you were needing.would need to interchange nozzles onto the gun so that you could get the right type of pattern that you were needing. This is why we created the Spray Pods Gun
https://youtu.be/V6-KBwxBX4g
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Adhesion is the bond strength measurement of a coating to a substrate. When an adhesive is bonded to an item or surface, numerous physical, mechanical and chemical forces come into play, which may have an effect on each other. These need to be tested before a product can be used. One of the primary features of closed cell polyurethane chemistry is the adhesion strength on almost any substrate.

Determination of the failure point can be critical for the final use of the material and the adhesive. There are a large number of different adhesive products, which require different testing methods to characterise the properties of the material. Some examples include substrates, glue, creams, gels, paints and varnishes and bonding of different materials together in layers, which all require a different adhesive test, some times called pull testing. We decided to test the Dry Wall Adhesive and the Black Can Foam to show you how strong these polyurethane foam sealants are.

https://youtu.be/fg6cWWKkjow
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
e are pleased to announce our new partnership with Selena USA, maker of TYTAN brand foam’s, adhesives and sealants. They have some very exciting new chemistry which we will integrate into many of our spray platforms and we see a tremendous opportunity to bring a new way of air sealing to drywall installation.

Rudy Ruiz, owner of RR “Drywall and Painting” in Yorkville, Illinois, regarding his experience with TYTAN’s Drywall Spray Adhesive, and he says it has performed better than he could imagine. He’s been in the drywall and painting business for 40 years and has seen it all with drywall installation, taping and painting issues. He does a lot of drywall installation and painting work for D.R. Horton, one of the biggest residential builders in the country.”

There are two problems he’s had to deal with that are the most important quality issues on any drywall job: screw pops and visible seams. As he said “they can make or break a drywall company like mine.”

https://vimeo.com/161723683
Add a comment...
Wait while more posts are being loaded