Profile cover photo
Profile photo
Wade P. Haggard
76 followers -
Cedar Hills UT
Cedar Hills UT

76 followers
About
Posts

Post has attachment

Post has attachment
Add a comment...

Post has attachment

Post has attachment

Post has attachment

Post has attachment
I'm Doomed!
We are all preppers.  In some form or fashion, rather it is minute or extravagant, we are all preppers.  We have insurance, we have spare keys, we have locks on our doors and these items are all preps.  We have lines of credit for a financial prep, we have Band-Aids and pain relievers alongside flu medications for our health prep.  Most of us have a few canned goods in the cupboard for nutrition prep.  In my geek-filled world we call it redundancy, in the business world it is risk mitigation, all are simply preparations.
 
We also think very similarly in that those who prep more than us are extreme and those who prep less unprepared.  We each have our own collections, some collect guns and knives (weirdos, sorry mom) while others collect food, clothes, some just enjoy pastimes that include prepping intentionally or not, like canning.  We can all prep, in a practical manner. 
 Although I truly enjoy flipping on the television and watching the latest scare-tactic-filled panic driven show preparing me for the coming zombie apocalypse.  Unfortunately, after stockpiling one's shelves with the latest neon green overpriced items from knives & ammunition to MREs (Meal Ready to Eat) we are faced with the reality that the Zombie Apocalypse is not coming, and you are still not prepared.
         "But Wade!  Something similar could happen."
 No my friend, something similar is not going happen.  Zombies are not real and never will be.  There are however some very real historical disasters that we can learn from.  My goal is to help provide basic information so that in your world, rather it is out in the country with plenty of space or somewhere in the city in a cramped apartment and little space, you have some basic preps to protect yourself and your family.  Ultimately this will not be a dramatic, end of the world, collapse of society, scare tactic-filled, insert your favorite stereotype “here” prepper blog.  I am focusing on practicality and logic for those of us who wish to support our families and our communities in the event of an unplanned, unpleasant, and possible catastrophe.  Where achievable, I suggest items that are useful outside of the "Zombie Apocalypse."
 
Life is filled with possibility versus probability. Where I live it is very possible there will be a catastrophic earthquake. What is the probability that it will happen in my years?  The severity level may, in fact, be the deciding dynamic as to what is probable. There has already been several small tremors over my lifetime, none of which would be considered catastrophic and none of which required me to have much more than preps to survive without water and electricity for 24 hours.  It is possible that one such tremor could cause a gas leak, and they have, not at my house but others. Do you know how to turn off the natural gas or propane at your house in such an event?
 
Over the course of the next few months, I will be adding to this avenue of my blog. I will be covering subjects from your most important prep to common disasters and their historical significance and outcome. As I am sure we will touch on every subject involved in prepping, I'm also sure not every subject applies to everybody. I have learned in my many years that even though a conversation may not wholly apply to me, in some cases not even remotely, by listening and understanding points of view there is a strategic benefit to understanding subjects outside my realm of concern.
 
The first step to recovery is admitting you have a problem.  Well, folks, we all have problems, and if we don't we are going to.  When I was 12 the little town I lived in, as well is all the surrounding towns, was hit by terrible rainstorms on top of frozen ground which resulted in incredibly destructive flooding. Electricity, gas, and thus heat, clean water, and even access to the town itself were all adversely affected in some way shape or form. Growing up in the area I did, most community members have alternate water, power, heat, and plenty of food stores. If something as simple as a nasty flood hit your area, would you be okay to hold up for 72 hours? Would you be prepared to leave within 10 min. of notification?
 
Check back from time to time. Follow us on Facebook and twitter to keep up as new posts appear. We all believe it will never happen to us, but stand at the bottom of a trailhead and see how many hikers returned to the parking lot with only one sock. It is obvious that they weren't prepared. It should be a fun conversation and let's keep it lighthearted as that's just my style. After all, I'm Doomed.
 
Be Happy, Be Zombie-Free, and Share Your Adventures... Include the Kids!

Shop Now and Save at Amazon.com!
Privacy Information
Add a comment...

Post has attachment

Post has attachment
I love my Boots...

Every fall, as the brilliant greens fade from the leaves giving way to bursts of orange, red, and yellow, my pulse quickens and anticipation grows.  Screeching tubular calls echo in the canyons when ghosts of the forest enter the rut.  Finding the source of the call becomes an obsession.  Wapiti move silent, surprisingly so when you consider the sheer mass of these magnificent creatures.  Their screams betray location and intent, fueling my desire to track and harvest arguably the world's tastiest protein.
 
I usually wait until the traffic of the mountains has settled, the main hunts have all ended and I approach the mountains with my muzzle loader, humming the theme to “Last of the Mohicans” while I run through aspens and sage.  In my mind, I flow with the energy of the mountains and meld with the spirit of the forest.  In reality, my misdirected hippie-tendencies are only trumped in falsehood by my lack of graceful movement and harmonious incongruity. 

This year, I have a rifle tag for both a bull and a cow, so I am hunting primetime.  Every hunter in the state of Utah from amateur to the profession will be in the forests searching the most valued quarry.  Every ATV, UTV, OHV, and Jeep will make a single lane forest road back up like I-15 at rush hour.  My only hope, my boots.
In prepping for this year's hunt I reacquaint myself with one of my favorite areas in the Uintah mountains.  It is a favorite because the roads are rough (OHV only), not tactically advantageous for “truck” hunting, and provide access to several trailheads. I will only compete with other “boots” for hunting area.  This area offers and exceptional position for a base camp, including a chance for Dutch oven cooking, from which I will launch daily excursions to several small lakes and a long ridge with a superb view.  It is a little slice of heaven on earth, a living history lesson.

I have many sets of boots.  I like boots they take me places.  This time of year can be tricky, there may be snow and temperatures may be freezing. I have a little leeway based on the socks I choose and my sock liners. (If you aren't using sock liners you really should consider it; you're missing a wonderful world of comfort.)  My late-season boots are insulated with Thinsulate and are excellent for late fall. This year I'm hunting a full month earlier, so I am going to go with lightweight boots and wool socks.
 My boot of choice is the Merrell Moab Rover waterproof boot. A lightweight waterproof boot with excellent ankle support, correct sizing, and durable Vibram soles. I put hundreds of miles on these fantastic boots and they have responded well.  I have what you might consider a duck foot, wide up front and narrow at the heel. The Merrell's are offered in wide widths and are able to fit my foot perfectly when equipped with no tie elastic locking shoe laces. The interior of the shoe sports a mesh lining allowing your foot to breathe. The Merrell's are at the top of my list when it comes to quality hiking gear, like your straw filter of life.
Early morning mists crisp enough to sting your lungs veiled over lush green Meadows at the peak of their perfection call me miles to places most people will never visit.  Solitary silence rings loudly in my ears, I can hear everything and nothing at the same time. Goosebumps raise on my arms and fog escapes my mouth while I scan between trees and brush. Later in the day I know I will be hanging in my best double camping hammock. sharing a Pop Tart with at least one chipmunk, it is a yearly ritual and a conversation I look forward to. This is a place of beauty, a place of peace, and after miles of hiking my boots have brought me to a place where I find the best me I can be.  Thank you boots.
 
 
Be Happy, Be helpful, and Share Your Adventures... Include the Kids!

Shop Now and Save at Amazon.com!
Privacy Information
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Feels Better Than it Sounds.
Remember when you were just a kid in grade school, thinking about all the money mom and dad had and how silly they were to budget and spend it on ridiculous items like heat and groceries? I remember thinking, "someday when I get a big old paycheck I'm going to the store and buying several thousand Swedish Fish."  Yes, folks, I was that kid.  Although my craving for Swedish fish went away by my first paycheck, I was still a kid in a candy store. The world of outdoor adventures quickly became my addiction and I was the candy man.
What does any of that have to do with where I'm at now? I am happy to say I've matured a little bit, a very little bit. Somehow I have managed to become responsible and budget my money. When it comes to comfort in the outdoors there are many different levels, spending options, and needs. When I'm setting up a base camp I prefer to have the most comfortable set up on the planet and I am not afraid to spend a little cash.  The setup starts with my XXL cot; a review can be found here. Only slightly less important is my Exped Downmat. 
 
Exped began as a distributor in the early 80s and in the late 90s began to create their own gear, much like another most excellent retailer you may have heard of.  The company focused on highly innovative products that met the need of outdoor enthusiasts, (again the similarities are uncanny.)  Utilizing motivated individuals who specialized in outdoor skills the company flourished and quickly gained favor in the adventuring community.  Products offered from Exped have fit and function aimed at the family to the professional.
My personal mat is the Downmat 9 LW.   The mat is made from polyester and filled with 700 fill goose down. An integrated hand pump makes inflating the down mat easy and quick. As an added bonus you will get “Popeye” forearms from the flat palm rocking motions you make to inflate the mat.  The mat weighs just over 43 ounces, which seems heavy, but in reality, when you factor in comfort and warmth it is well worth the extra weight, even when ultralight backpacking.  I place mine in my hammock for comfort and insulation!

The Downmat 9 LW sports an R-value of 8.0, one of the highest available.  Shoulder width is impressive 25 1/2 inches with an overall length exceeding 77. For us big dudes that is a welcome base on which to lay our weary head. The mat fills to just over 3 1/2 inches thick when fully inflated, I find my sleep number to be about 210 pumps.  Packed the mat is just over 10 inches long and about 6 inches around, easily packed and easily set up.
You can easily adjust your mat to your preference of firmness. The materials keep the mat quiet during your sleep. You may think this is a silly observation but some of the crinklier mats I have used have irritated me every time I move. I do not sleep like a log anymore; in fact, I tend to roll over about every 30 minutes.  The last thing you and your fellow campers want to hear all night is the crunching of your neighbor's poorly constructed sleep mat. Not so here, all is quiet on the Wadester front, and back, and side.
Don't let the retail price scare you. When it comes to comfort and warmth, this may very well be the most important piece of equipment you take with you.  I cannot emphasize enough the importance of a ground mat when backpacking, especially in late fall and early spring. You will do far better to spend your money here than on a tent or even a sleeping bag.  Give it a look and take it out for a spin.
 
Be happy, Be comfortable, and Share Your Adventures!
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
...with a total Dad-Bod!
We have long passed the point of Internet access or reliable cell service. The moon shone overhead seems bigger than the world itself and is blazing a beautiful orange sheen. The purples and blues radiate from the sunset boiling down to reds and yellows.  A cool breeze wafts across the cheat grass and through the junipers rocking my hammock back and forth. Both dogs are running like crazed beasts through the sagebrush while puffs of smoke emanate from the grill and the smell of perfectly cooked steaks alongside a Dutch oven of my fresh peach cobbler makes my mouth water.  Have your Dutch oven mitts handy and get in line first, at least in my camp.
Camp is set up and life is good.  Adding to our evening’s entertainment we typically pick a board or card game to play as a family. Board games, cards, and a few good books are a big part of this family's camping tradition. I especially appreciate games that get the “ole noodle” working.  This trip happens to be a mixture of crazy eights, old maid, and a deck building game based on DC comics.

In the DC comics game, we each take on the role of our favorite superhero, or you can choose randomly if you wish to follow the rules.  Starting with basic cards we attempt to purchase better ones in the hope of defeating villains and super villains. For each battle and purchase, we are rewarded with victory points to be added up at the end of the game. Players may also defend themselves with specific cards and create incredible effect loops to gain power.  All in all a straight forward game that is easily played in 30-40 minutes.  An excellent YouTube video can be found, well, on YouTube.
 
The game almost reminds me of Legendary from Upper Deck.  For Camping trips on my tiny table, I definitely prefer DC, even if only based on setup and cleanup.  If you remember Legendary it was quite a mess.  DC is easy to teach to new players, not just from the basics but also easy to pick up a strategy to become a competitive player.  DC is a completely competitive game, there is no co-op (unless you add your own rules.)  Don't get me wrong, DC is still plenty complex enough to keep your mind working.
 
Each superhero has special abilities and unique powers that open up different strategies to the player. This is one of my favorite aspects of the game as I like to see my 10-year-old planning what he will do next and then three or four turns down the road. Combos based on superhero and super power add to the mix as some strategies become overpowered with the right cards.
Another of my favorite aspects of this game, as well as other deck building games with the Cerberus engine, is the ability to mix the various games from my entire collection. This gives the option of a super battle between various fantasy worlds and superheroes.  Ever wonder what happens when your favorite superhero meets up with your favorite hobbit?  All you have to do is play to find out.
 
There are 214 standard size cards in the set as well as seven oversized. Be sure to get a few sets of cards sleeves to protect your investment.  Grab a set of Grip-Tight Locking Laces to secure around your games as you travel, smart investment tip.
Be Outdoors, Be Playful, and Share Your Adventures!
Add a comment...
Wait while more posts are being loaded