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Thus far, space exploration has seen small medical emergencies, but not big ones. However, it is likely that there will be life-threatening situations requiring rapid medical and surgical intervention if humans do set down on the Red Planet. Looking at the National Geographic series MARS, this blog post explores the type of medical care that will be needed for space exploration by looking at similar situations in wilderness medicine and new technologies like FAST. Read more here:
http://bit.ly/2iePAu5 #MARS #space #medicine
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Did you know that beer makers advanced the field of statistics? It takes a lot of science to brew beer well, so the Guinness Brewery hired scientists to perfect beer-making techniques. The “Student’s t-distribution” is a very important mathematical tool that came out of the Guinness Brewery research laboratory. This tool is necessary in constructing confidence intervals, a key component of inferential statistics. Learn more in our new module, Confidence Intervals: http://bit.ly/2h3Tzfn #math #visionlearning
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Did you know that if you took a helium balloon to the top of Mount Everest, it would get bigger and might even pop? Conversely, if you took a helium balloon deep enough under the ocean, it would shrivel up. This is because of the basic properties of gases, which in addition to explaining the behavior of balloons are key to critical functions like breathing and lifesaving technology like automobile airbags.

Our newest module describes the properties of gases and explores how these properties relate to a common set of behaviors called the gas laws. With a focus on Boyle’s Law, Charles’s Law, and Avogadro’s Law, an overview of 400 years of research shows the development of our understanding of gas behavior. The module presents the ideal gas equation and explains when this equation can—and cannot—be used to predict the behavior of real gases.

See the full module here: http://bit.ly/2gvYD8K #chemistry #gases #science
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From our blog archive: Turkey science – What’s on your plate? Author Bonnie Denmark explores how humans have used selective breeding, or artificial selection, to produce turkeys with desirable characteristics, resulting in the bird we see on our Thanksgiving tables. Read more here: http://bit.ly/2fCfRS6 #thanksgiving
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On November 18, 1929 the underwater telegraph cables snapped and became the first documented example of a turbidity current. This type of current is an underwater debris flow careening down the continental slope at the speed of an automobile. Read more about this fascinating story here: http://bit.ly/2fLd1dR #science #history
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In 1895, Wilhelm Röntgen produced the first x-ray on this day. (The "X" stood for the mathematical notation of something unknown.) #science
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Happy birthday J.J. Thomson, born in 1856. Thomson's most important line of work helped to smash Dalton’s theory that atoms resembled tiny billiard balls. Thomson conducted experiments with a newly discovered scientific oddity, the cathode ray tube (now familiar to most people because of cathode ray TV and computer screens). Thomson observed that cathode rays, a strange stream of particles that appeared to fly across a vacuum tube when an electric current was introduced across it, would bend in the presence of a magnetic field. Thomson realized that these strange particles, which he called corpuscles, had a negative electrical charge and were much less massive than the atoms from which they came. This discovery showed that atoms were not solid billiard balls, but were made up of equally charged positive and negative components. The discovery of J.J.’s corpuscles, now called electrons, caused a sensation in scientific circles in 1897 and eventually resulted in his being awarded a Nobel Prize (1906). Thomson’s discovery would also lead one of his students, Ernest Rutherford, to redefine the atomic model. Read more in our Atomic Theory I module: http://bit.ly/2972bgM #physics
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Why did NASA send a 77 year-old politician on a 9-hour flight, a man whose earlier space experience had been for five hours at the age of 40? The basic idea was to utilize John Glenn as his own age control. By comparing Glenn’s physiological and medical data during the high-G launch, reentry, and weightless phases of the flights, researchers hoped to gain some kind of insight on the effects of aging. This is because weightlessness affects the body similar to aging on various body systems, such as the cardiovascular system and bones. Learn more about our national hero who recently passed away here: http://bit.ly/2h6NlLO #space
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Did you know that #AIDS has killed 35 million people since 1981? An HIV diagnosis used to be a certain death sentence, but with medical breakthroughs pioneered by Taiwanese American doctor David Ho, HIV can now be managed indefinitely without becoming full-blown AIDS. Case in point: Basketball great Magic Johnson was found to be HIV-positive in 1991, just as Ho’s research team was designing a combination drug therapy that would target the biology of the HIV virus. Owing to the effectiveness of the “AIDS cocktail,” Johnson remains disease-free 15 years later.

The module traces Ho’s journey from entering Los Angeles public schools at age 12 as a Taiwanese immigrant with no English to being named Time Magazine’s “Man of the Year” and being awarded the Presidential Citizens Medal for combating the HIV/AIDS epidemic. Topics include how the #HIV virus replicates and mutates and how effective drugs target the biology of HIV. Also described is Ho’s work toward equality in HIV care around the world and among underserved populations in the US.

Read the full profile here: http://bit.ly/2gvPMHO #science #medicine
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1, 1, 2, 3, ... Happy #Fibonacci Day #science #math
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Theodore Roosevelt (left) and nature preservationist John Muir (right), founder of the Sierra Club, stand atop Glacier Point in Yosemite National Park. In the background are the upper and lower Yosemite Falls. Muir was an early proponent of the modern field of conservation #biology http://bit.ly/2fB4Cdm
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Happy Birthday, Madame Curie! She was born on November 7, 1867. She began studying mathematics, chemistry and physics at the Sorbonne in 1891, and was the first woman to teach there. She passed her physics degree with flying colors, and went on to earn a mathematics degree. Marie and Pierre Curie were inseparable, working side by side in the laboratory during the day and studying together in the evening. The Curie’s found that uranium ore, or pitchblende, contained much more radioactivity than could be explained solely by the uranium content. The Curie's began a search for the source of this radioactivity and in 1898 discovered two highly radioactive elements, radium and polonium. For this work, the Curie's shared the 1903 Nobel prize for physics with another French physicist, Antoine Henri Becquerel, who had discovered natural radioactivity. Curie continued her work on radioactive elements after her husband died and she received a second Nobel Prize, in 1911, in recognition of her work isolating radium in its pure metallic form and developing the first international standard for measuring the substance. One year following her death, in 1935, her eldest daughter, Irène Joliot-Curie, won the Nobel prize in chemistry for her work with radioactivity. #chemistry #womeninstem
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Visionlearning provides free, high-quality science learning modules that have been shown to be more effective than traditional textbooks in teaching science. Touching on disciplines ranging from physics to biology, our modules explore the process of science and the people who make it possible.
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