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Vape Pens, Mods, E-Cigs, E-Liquids, E-Hookah, E-Nail, Vaporizers and Vape Life.
Vape Pens, Mods, E-Cigs, E-Liquids, E-Hookah, E-Nail, Vaporizers and Vape Life.

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VTA warns of ‘third wave’ of Trump Tariffs issued Tuesday on vaping products: Whatever is going on in the Trump White House is posing another major, significant threat to the American vaping community.  In an announcement yesterday, the Trump Administration has implemented another round of tariffs on Chinese imports that will include products from food seasonings to almonds, baseball gloves, and e-cig components. This third wave of Trump Tariffs totals $60 billion.  The combined total exceeds a whopping $200 billion, representing a 25% increase overall by the end of the year – just 3 months away.  China immediately shot back with a tit-for-tat response by adding another $60 billion in tariffs of its own on U.S. imports.  Depending on the product, American exporters will see a 5-10 percent increase, which will likely be transferred onto consumers both in the United States and abroad in the form of increased price tags.   The Vapor Technology Association, Trump Tariffs, and Vaping Furthermore – and perhaps even more alarming - the Trump Administration has already admitted that more tariffs in the future are already in the works.  Tuesday’s announcement comes just days before planned trade negotiations in Beijing between representatives of both governments.   Now, those scheduled trade talks may not even take place.  A spokesperson for the Chinese government issued the following statement via CNN. "The Chinese side has repeatedly emphasized that the only correct way to solve the trade dispute between China and the United States is through talk and consultation on the basis of equity, integrity and mutual respect…But what the US side has done doesn't show sincerity or goodwill.” Since China is the leading supplier of vaping devices, parts, and components to consumers in the United States, the Vapor Technology Association (VTA) is leading the charge to stop this continuous onslaught of Trump Tariffs.  On July 24, 2018, VTA representatives testified before the International Trade Commission (ITC) to denounce the first two waves and to try to prevent yesterday’s third wave from being implemented.  Now, the VTA is issuing an official warning to American vapers by way of an email and social media marketing campaign. “Today, the Trump Administration announced they will impose a 10% tariff on over $200 billion worth of Chinese goods, including vapor parts and components. These tariffs will go into effect next week on September 24th. The Administration also announced they plan to raise them to 25% next year. More than half a trillion dollars in imported goods now fall under the tariffs imposed since last year. These duties hurt our entire industry, from suppliers to wholesalers to retailers.” VTA is also renewing their vow to continue fighting these tariffs on behalf of the American vaping community.  There were some 375 witnesses testifying in the July 2018 hearings, and VTA officials were the only ones aggressively representing American vapers, businesses, vape shops, and manufacturers.  To learn more about the VTA organization or to offer assistance in the battle over Trump Tariffs, contact guidance@vaportechnology.org.  Related Article: VTA joins legal battle over 3rd wave of Trump Tariffs against vaping (Image courtesy of Shutterstock)

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Squawk Box Alert: Is Gottlieb implementing a vaping flavor ban in 60 days?: In a recent interview on CNBC’s Squawk Box, U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Commissioner Scott Gottlieb used his time in the spotlight to blast the Juul company for a perceived rise in teen vaping.  His mainstream media rant came just hours after the FDA ordered five major manufacturers of electronic vaping technology to submit corporate plans of action to address the issue of teen vaping prevention.  These plan submissions are mandatory and must be submitted within the next 60-days. The same FDA press release also states that over 1,300 individual businesses within the vaping technology sector have recently been issued official warning letters and/or financial penalties related to underage sales.  During the Squawk Box interview, Gottlieb claims that this national surge in teen vaping is largely due to Juul and its kid-appealing marketing practices. “We have access to early data right now that we’re going to make public very soon that shows us that the proportion of high school teenagers that using e-cigarettes is reaching nothing short of an epidemic level, in my view.  And it requires us to step in and take dramatic action to try to curtail this.” FDA's Gottlieb on threat to pull e-cigarettes from shelves from CNBC. FDA Chief Gottlieb then goes on to suggest that his agency will further be targeting flavored e-liquids, as well.  He acknowledges that vaping technology may provide certain health benefits for adult smokers trying to quit, but he also firmly states that these benefits should not come at the expense of teen nicotine addiction and “eventually onto (combustible) tobacco products.”  Once again, Gottlieb seems to be intentionally conflating nicotine with tobacco while promoting the unproven claim that teen vaping is a gateway to adult smoking.  “So, unfortunately, in order to close the on-ramp to kids, we’re going to have to narrow that on-ramp for adults.  And the thing we’re looking at right now is removing the flavors – the characterizing flavors – from e-cigarette products.” Squawk Box host and interviewer Rebecca Quick also chimed in.  “That makes sense.  I mean, it never made sense to me the argument that adults who are trying to quit smoking would suddenly turn to vaping for flavors like mango or donut or pineapple.  That seems like it’s entirely designed to lure in non-smokers and new customers.” The Trump-appointed FDA commissioner promised that he would “keep an open eye” (he most likely meant open “mind”) on the situation before implementing any new vaping regulations, but he also makes another, more ominous declaration.  Gottlieb states clearly and firmly that he will "hear them out over the next 60 days before we take action."  The possibility of a future vaping ban on flavored e-liquids looks to be all but imminent, unless the five e-cig manufacturers listed in the FDA press release - Juul, Vuse, MarkTen XL, Blu and Logic 60 – can convince Mr. Gottlieb otherwise.  Related Article:  Former Trump Official: FDA Chief Scott Gottlieb has ‘lost his mind’ over vaping ban (Image courtesy of CNBC)    

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USA Today: Mom of teenage delinquent wants FDA to make vaping illegal: America loves its Nanny State regulations, and a recent article in USA Today illustrates this ridiculous concept perfectly.  The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has recently announced the extension of an internal investigation into the allegedly rise in teen vaping in recent years.  In a press announcement last week, much of the FDA’s disgust with the vaping industry seems to be targeted on five major manufacturers - Juul, Vuse, MarkTen XL, Blu and Logic 60.  Juuling among middle and high school students is rising in popularity.  Few can dispute these claims, but the USA Today article highlights the story of an Ohio mother who seeming supports more aggressive regularity actions against vaping while blaming the Juul organization for her child’s alleged criminal behavior. “Kelli Cogan says her 15-year-old son was able to get free Juul cartridges online last year by using his father's name and birth name and having them shipped to a different address. The Ohio woman says the company offered to block her husband's name from ordering, but she didn't think that was sufficient.”  So, let’s get this straight.  Ms. Cogan claims that her teenage son pilfered his father’s credit card without his father or mother knowing.  The teen then went online and purchased a bunch of Juul products illegally.  Since all the majority of online retailers now require age identification of some kind, the reader can safely assume that the teenager also knowingly falsified his age at the time of the purchase by using a fictitious birth date.  Even more alarming, the mischievous youngster had the devious incite to have the Juul items shipped to a third-party address so that neither parent would learn of his illegal actions. Poor vaping laws or bad parenting? For the above reasons, Ms. Cogen wants the FDA to ban nicotine, and by extension, vaping devices and flavored e-liquids, one can safely assume by reading the USA Today article. * Cogen is essentially blaming the United States government and the FDA for failing to protect her delinquent son from the ability to purchase vaping products online illegally. * Cogen is also seemingly blaming the Juul for her son’s poor choices to illegally engage in an activity that is expressly designed and marketed as a tobacco harm reduction tool to help adult smokers quit. * Cogen is NOT blaming herself or her spouse for failing to parent her child on the differences between right and wrong. Google defines the term nanny state as any law or regulation that is “overprotective or as interfering unduly with personal choice.” Ms. Cohen’s stance on the issue of FDA vaping regulations is a perfect example of this term. Should the American public be forced to do without lifesaving products (vaping devices and e-liquids) that have successfully helped millions of people to quit smoking simply because her teenage son engaged in criminal activities to purchase them?   Should the United States also ban the selling of automobiles if her son just so happened to steal the neighbor’s Mercedes for a joyride around the city?  Or should Ms. Cohen instead focus more on improving her poor parenting skills, and perhaps instill a bit of discipline into her teenage child as a punishment for his illegal and downright criminal behavior.  Related Article:  Citing teen vaping as an ‘epidemic,’ FDA Chief Scott Gottlieb launches investigation (Image courtesy of Shutterstock)

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Former Trump Official: FDA Chief Scott Gottlieb has ‘lost his mind’ over vaping ban: Matt Braynard is a former Data Chief and Strategist for President Donald Trump, and he also seems to be a very staunch and vocal advocate for vaping.  In a recent interview with The Hill, the ex-Trump official suggests that Commissioner Scott Gottlieb of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) must have lost his mind for attempting to regulate the American vaping industry out of business. Under the direction of Gottlieb, the FDA has been pummeling vaping retailers and manufacturers in recent months with a series of probes, investigations, and site inspections amid accusations of kid-appealing marketing practices.  The FDA also openly suggests this surge in teen vaping will theoretically act as a gateway to adult smoking addiction somewhere in the future.  Related Article: Citing teen vaping as an ‘epidemic,’ FDA Chief Scott Gottlieb launches investigation However, FDA officials always fail to make clear how hooking teenagers on combustible cigarettes somehow benefits the American vaping industry in any way whatsoever.  Braynard appears to find the FDA Commissioner’s argument rather ridiculous, as well. “What the FDA chief is proposing here — Scott Gottlieb — is not to, say, limit teenagers from being able to buy this, it’s not educating people it might be harmful but to banning it entirely for everybody including adults, which seems to me that he has lost his mind.” “(FDA commissioner Gottlieb) is formerly of the AEI [American Enterprise Institute], a very free market institute, and if he just consulted with his former doctor and AEI scholars...who have written extensively on the minimal risks of these nicotine vape products compared to cigarettes – which are incredibly dangerous and have been killing people for over 100 years, (he) would understand that banning this product from the market wholesale will have tremendous costs.  There is great risk reduction by allowing these products on the market.” This most recent outpouring of support of vaping by Mr. Braynard comes in response to a September 12 press announcement by the FDA calling teen vaping a national “epidemic.”  The press release also states that as many as 1,100 vaping-related businesses across the country recently received official FDA warning letters regarding the sales of juuls and other vaping products to minors.  Another 131 establishments even received financial penalties for repeated misconduct.  The full video of the Braynard interview taking place on September 13 – the day after the FDA press release - can be viewed via The Hill.  Related Article:  Trump Administration stymies approval of marijuana research applications (Image courtesy of The Hill)

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Big Tobacco stocks soar amid FDA accusations targeting vaping, juuling: Tobacco stocks soared to new highs immediately following an announcement by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) accusing the American vaping industry of poor business practices.   British American Tobacco stocks jumped sharply by 6.9 percent while Altria Group shareholders experienced a 7 percent impulse simultaneously.  Philip Morris also came out a big winner, soaring to its highest ticker price in about three years. This cumulative rally is Big Tobacco’s largest in over a decade.  What led to this strange set of events?  On Wednesday, September 12, an FDA press announcement stated that agency officials had recently sent some 1,100 warning letters to vape vendors around the country accused of allegedly participating in illegal underage sales.  Another 131 civil violations were also issued, each with some sort of financial penalty.  Is the Trump Administration in cahoots with Big Tobacco? Accusations that teen juuling acts as a gateway to adult smoking have plagued the vaping industry for years.  In the past several months, the FDA under direction of the Trump-appointed commissioner Scott Gottlieb has issued several unofficial pleas for self-regulation.  In fact, in late February 2018, Chief Gottlieb posted a rather ominous 42-word tweet that got the full attention of vaping advocates around the country. “Adults can’t favor preserving properly regulated e-cigarettes as an alternative for smokers who quit combustible tobacco, and not at same time vigorously oppose child access to e-cigs. The industry isn’t sustainable if it leads to a whole generation of youth initiation on tobacco” — @SGottliebFDA  Related Article:  FDA Chief may have just threatened vaping a 42-word tweet The tweet implying “stop selling to kids...or else” was only a predicate of things to come.  Just a month later, the FDA announced the launching of a federal probe into the pros and cons of flavored e-liquids.  Agency officials had apparently been receiving a rash of complaints that e-liquid companies were perhaps intentionally targeting the marketing of their products to teenagers by using candies, cartoons, and other kid-appealing imagery in their advertising strategies.  The probe ended in mid-July amid allegations that the FDA website received over one-quarter of a million spammed comments by anti-vaping activists. Related Article: The Final Countdown: FDA probe on vaping flavors ends in 4-days on July 16 By the FDA’s actions of constantly shining a negative spotlight on the American vaping industry, the conspiracy theory that Big Tobacco and political officials are somehow in cahoots is once again beginning to rear its ugly head.  Meanwhile, tobacco company investors and shareholders have grown increasingly concerned that the widespread popularity of e-cigarettes – particularly Juuls - will eventually and negatively affect the price of associated stocks.  Bloomberg reports that “if the (vaping) ban were to happen, Altria Group is mostly likely to benefit,” according to Wells Fargo analyst Bonnie Herzog.  The FDA announcement of last Wednesday seems to have temporarily curtailed this potential Big Tobacco stock crash for the short term. Related Article:  Citing teen vaping as an ‘epidemic,’ FDA Chief Scott Gottlieb launches investigation (Image courtesy of Shutterstock)

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Citing teen vaping as an ‘epidemic,’ FDA Chief Scott Gottlieb launches investigation: In a press release issued by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) last week, Commissioner Scott Gottlieb admits to sending some 1,100 warning letters to vaping retailers suspected of selling to minors. His agency has further issued another 131 civil financial penalties to vape shops that have already been caught repeatedly conducting these types of illegal sales activities. And Gottlieb is not stopping there.  The FDA has also instructed five of the vaping industry’s most predominate manufacturers to provide very specific and high-detailed plans of action outlining their long-term corporate efforts to prevent teen vaping.  Retailers Juul, Vuse, MarkTen XL, Blu and Logic 60 make up an estimated 97 percent of the national market share of e-cig sales, and Gottlieb is demanding their responses to the FDA investigation within the next 60 days. “Given the magnitude of the problem, we’re requesting that the manufacturers of these brands and products come back to the FDA in 60 days with robust plans on how they’ll convincingly address the widespread use of their products by minors, or we’ll revisit the FDA’s exercise of enforcement discretion for products currently on the market.” According to a report in USA Today, the FDA firmly believes that more than 2 million middle school, high school, and college students are now vaping regularly.  And because the federal agency misguidedly misclassifies vaping devices as tobacco products per the FDA deeming regulations of 2015, Gottlieb apparently is under political pressure to resolve the issue one way or another.  This more current investigation follows a former 120-day FDA probe which ended earlier this summer regarding the potential pros and cons of flavored e-liquids being sold in the United States. Related Article: The Final Countdown: FDA probe on vaping flavors ends in 4-days on July 16 In the final days of the earlier probe ending in July, reports began to surface that the government website responsible for collecting public remarks received over one-quarter of a million spammed comments that were anti-vaping in nature and worded very similarly in both tone and style.  Suspicions began to mount on social media that the notoriously vaping hating organization The Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids may have been the likely culprit.  The FDA neither confirmed nor denied these claims of alleged wrong doing. Poor parenting or teen vaping epidemic? Whenever the FDA issues these press releases, then usually forget – perhaps intentionally – to distinguish the vast health differences between smoking and vaping.  Yes, statistics show that teen e-cig use in escalating, but data released by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) indicates a rapid decline in teen smoking rates simultaneously. Related Article:  Did the CDC just confirm that vaping is not a gateway to teen smoking? Since many public health experts agree that vaping is up to 95 percent less harmful than smoking, the fact that teenagers are choosing the former rather than the latter should be viewed as somewhat positive news.  However, the FDA’s push to intentionally and dishonestly equate vaping with smoking seems to be working.  In the aforementioned USA Today article, the reporter refers to a conversation with a parent of a teenage vaper- a woman named Kelli Cogan.  “Kelli Cogan says her 15-year-old son was able to get free Juul cartridges online last year by using his father's name and birth name and having them shipped to a different address. The Ohio woman says the company offered to block her husband's name from ordering, but she didn't think that was sufficient.”  The USA Today article offers some rather interesting background on this alleged teen vaping problem.  If Cogan is to be believed, then her poor ability to parent her child is reason enough for the United States government to delegalize vaping devices and flavored e-liquids.  Her teenage son essentially stole his father’s credit card, purchased vaping products online, and was devious enough to actually have the e-cigs shipped to the address of a complicit third-party. Talk about your Nanny State regulations.  Ms. Cogan seems to want the FDA to help co-parent her child. Related Article:  CDC says teen vaping is down; mainstream media blames ‘juuling’ error FDA Chief Gottlieb seems to agree with Ms. Cogan’s reasoning.  In the Wednesday press release, Gottlieb calls teen vaping an “epidemic” that should no longer be tolerated. “Today we can see that this epidemic of addiction was emerging when we first announced our plan last summer. Hindsight, and the data now available to us, reveal these trends. And the impact is clearly apparent to the FDA.  Unfortunately, I now have good reason to believe that it’s reached nothing short of an epidemic proportion of growth.” Meanwhile in the days following the announcement of more aggressive investigatory efforts by the FDA into underage sales of vaping technology, something rather odd is happening on Wall Street. Bloomberg reports that since the FDA press release last week, Big Tobacco stocks rallied for the first time in over a decade.  Altria Group and British American Tobacco saw gains of 7.7 percent and 6.9 percent, respectively, their highest jumps since 2008.  Related Article:  Attention Vapers: Beware of misleading CDC reports regarding ’59 vape shops’

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Three major mental health organizations endorse vaping: While federal public health agencies are often slow to admit that vaping is significantly less harmful than smoking, multiple privatized medical groups are now finding the courage to publicly endorse vaping as a legitimate form of tobacco harm reduction.  Last year, the vaping community was granted the surprise endorsement of the Mental Health & Smoking Partnership (MHSP) in the UK.  MHSP officials published its official endorsement on the government-funded website SmokeFreeAction.org. “When appropriately tailored these interventions are also effective for people with mental health conditions. Nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) is effective, but is likely to be required in high doses, for longer durations and with more intensive behavioural support than in the general population of smokers. Provision of the nicotine that smokers are addicted to without the harmful components of tobacco smoke can prevent most of the harm from smoking.” Related Article:  Switching to vaping has 37 percent success rate, says new report But MHSP is not alone in its affinity of vaping as a smoking cessation and tobacco harm reduction tool.  This year, a professional group dedicated specifically to nurses specializing in the field of drug and alcohol addiction and recovery are also making their collective validation of vaping known.   In a press release entitled Electronic Cigarettes for Tobacco Harm Reduction, the Drug and Alcohol Nurses of Australia Incorporated (DANA) is now openly recommending electronic cigarettes as a healthier, safer substitute for smoking to patients and addicts in their care. Substitution therapy is a long-standing, proven technique used in overcoming one’s dependence on drugs or alcohol.  Travel to any Alcoholics Anonymous meeting, and afterwards its attendees will likely be gathered together outside smoking cigarettes and engaging in supportive conversation.  Cigarettes often become their substitutive “drug of choice.”  MHSP, DANA, and RANZCP mental health groups endorse vaping So, if smoking is so bad for one’s health, and the smoker is also addicted to sensory-impairing drugs or alcohol, then which should they give up first?  This is the age-old argument that has been plaguing mental health professionals for decades. Until vaping hit the scene, addiction counselors tended to focus on the drug and alcohol dependence first because of its more immediately negative consequences to multiple aspects of one’s life.    However, representatives of DANA seeming no longer believe that the two forms of addiction must be treated separately, thanks to recent research into the positive health benefits of vaping technology and electronic cigarettes. “People with drug and alcohol dependence have high smoking rates and greater difficulty quitting than other smokers. They are more likely to die from a tobacco-related disease than from their primary drug problem. Electronic cigarettes (E-cigarettes) are battery-operated devices that heat a liquid solution, which may or may not contain nicotine into a vapour for inhalation, simulating the behavioural and sensory aspects of smoking, and they are currently seen as a legitimate form of tobacco harm reduction. Nurses have an important role in asking people about their smoking, assessing the risk of tobacco use, advising about the risks, assisting smokers to stop or reduce their tobacco consumption, and arranging further support as appropriate.” Related Article:  Scientists say vaping helps patients with bipolar disorder, opiate addiction DANA and MHSP are not the only major mental health organizations endorsing vaping as a tobacco harm reduction tool and smoking cessation opportunity.  The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists (RANZCP) has also issued a similar endorsement of vaping. “The RANZCP believes that harm minimisation is an essential component of any policy framework that aims to improve health outcomes for people who smoke. E-cigarettes and vaporisers provide a safer way to deliver nicotine to those who are unable to stop smoking, thereby minimising the harms associated with smoking tobacco and reducing some of the health disparities experienced by people with mental illness. The RANZCP is concerned that policies with an unduly narrow focus on smoking cessation risk exacerbating the health disparities, and perpetuating the discrimination, which people living with mental illness currently experience.” Even though numerous mental health agencies around the world are now endorsing vaping as a healthier alternative to smoking, especially for addicts in recovery, the individual drug and alcohol recovery centers often have no-smoking policies dictated by their respective federal governments. Even though vaping is tobacco-free and its second-hand vapor has been proven to be about 95 percent less harmful to innocent bystanders than the smoke from combustible cigarettes, patients residing in addiction recovery centers are still discouraged or even prevented by law from vaping indoors.  Perhaps the endorsement of vaping by these three mental health organizations will eventually lead to positive change on the legislative front, as well.   Related Article:  National Institute of Health awards $1.4 million grant to review U.S. vaping laws (Image courtesy of Shutterstock)

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Trump Administration stymies approval of marijuana research applications: In the past two years since the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) began accepting applications for marijuana research, approximately two dozen applicants are still waiting in limbo.  Many weed enthusiasts are blaming the Trump Administration and the appointment of Jeff Sessions as the U.S. Attorney General for the breakdown in communication. Sessions is a longtime critic of legalized cannabis for either recreational or medicinal use.  He has, however, publicly stated on several occasions that he remains open-minded to the idea of more cannabis research in the future.  Still, Session’s office has not approved or denied a single application in his nearly 2-years on the job.   So, what gives? Marijuana research applicants in limbo According to a report issued by the Wall Street Journal, Sessions is not the government official directly in charge of the decision-making process.  The responsibility for approval or denial of the applications falls to the DEA which is a branch of the Justice Department.   Who runs the DEA?  That’s where the story gets even confusing. When Trump won the presidency and took office, Michele Leonhart was the then-current DEA Director.  She resigned in May 2016 shortly after the election, and Trump had the presidential authority to replace her.  He didn’t.  To this day, Trump still has not appointed anyone to take over, even though the U.S. has been facing a massive, constantly-expanding opioid crisis for several years.  Related Article:  Weed Update: Sean Spicer comment sends marijuana industry into state of panic According to federal regulations, when a DEA Chief resigns or leaves office for any reason, the next-in-line takes over until a new chief is appointed by the president and confirmed by the Senate.  The next-in-line is a person is a man named Charles Philip "Chuck" Rosenberg, who now has the title of ACTING Director of the DEA.  The term “acting” essentially means “temporary.” Technically speaking, Rosenberg could – in theory – approve these 2-dozen applications for marijuana research, at the risk of pissing off AG Jeff Sessions…and by extension Donald Trump.  Since Rosenberg is not even supposed to have his job as Acting DEA Chief in the first place, the chances of these approvals happening is almost nil unless Sessions gives Rosenberg the go-ahead.  The Wall Street Journal (WSJ) reports the following. “The applicants include a variety of entrepreneurs, as well as a university professor and a former Navy SEAL who wants to study how marijuana might help veterans suffering from chronic pain and post-traumatic stress. Republican and Democratic lawmakers have voiced frustration at the delays, saying Mr. Sessions has repeatedly avoided questions about the status of the applications. The inaction, they say, is stalling much-needed research into the potential health benefits of marijuana as society takes a more tolerant view of its use. A DEA spokeswoman referred questions to the Justice Department, which declined to comment.” The sounds of silence from the DEA is seemingly speaking volumes.  If the WSJ report is to be believed, both the GOP and the Democrats support the need for more marijuana research.  So, what’s the problem?  And how do marijuana research advocates solve their dilemma? Marijuana, midterms, and mayhem Once again, everything seems to be veering to a near-halt in Washington, DC until after the midterm elections.  If Democrats can win control of at least one chamber of congress in November, like the House of Representatives, perhaps marijuana researchers can finally get their respective application approvals or denials.  If the Dems do not win, then the current theory is that Trump is going to fire Sessions right after the midterms anyway.  Then maybe POTUS will appoint a more-pot-friendly Attorney General. In the meantime, there are four states with marijuana initiatives on the books for the 2018 midterms: Michigan, North Dakota, Utah, and Missouri.  These are some of the most deeply-red, most Trump-loving states in the union, too.  So, apparently, a large number of Trump supporters also support legal cannabis even if the Trump Administration seemingly doesn’t.  That’s at least one thing that both Democrats and Republican seem to have in common – their love of weed. Related Article:  Canada becomes 2nd nation in the world to legalize marijuana in violation of international law (Image courtesy of Shutterstock)

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Vanderbilt to research nicotine therapies as possible cure for Alzheimer’s: Scientists from Vanderbilt University now researching whether nicotine therapies might offer previously unknown health benefits for Alzheimer’s patients by improving their cognitive memory.  With further investigation, they may even discover a way to stop memory impairment in its tracks, if not reverse its damaging effects entirely.  These nicotine therapies could theoretically come in numerous forms, including transdermal patches, intravenous injections, or even inhalants via vaping devices. Nicotine research by Vanderbilt scientists is nothing new.  In fact, Dr. Paul Newhouse of Vanderbilt’s Center for Cognitive Medicine in Nashville, Tennessee, discovered in 2012 a link between the alkaloid found in nicotine and improved neurological functions in patients suffering from Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI).  The findings are published in a peer-reviewed paper entitled Nicotine treatment of mild cognitive impairment: a 6-month double-blind pilot clinical trial.  The report focusing primarily on transdermal applications is published via the U.S. National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health (NCBI). Vanderbilt’s Newhouse announces new nicotine study to commence Building upon this previous research, Dr. Newhouse and his Vanderbilt team has recently announced the commencement of an additional research project nicknamed MIND (Memory Improvement Through Nicotine Dosing).  The prior 2012 clinical trial lasted 6-months and involved a small control group of 55 elderly patients diagnosed with MCI.  The new MIND study will consist of over 300 participants and last a full 2-years.  “People think of [Nicotine] as a potentially noxious substance, but it’s a plant-derived medication just like a lot of other medications.”  “I am convinced that we will find a way to help improve early memory loss and make a real difference in people’s lives. In this study, we have an inexpensive, widely available potential treatment.” -  Paul Newhouse, Director, Lead Researcher of Vanderbilt’s MIND Project The vaping community is well aware that nicotine has a bad reputation within the general population, and Dr. Newhouse seemingly agrees.  Nicotine is a natural-occurring substance found in many plants and vegetables including eggplant, tomatoes, and potatoes.  But its close association with combustible tobacco and the resulting highly-carcinogenic, second-hand smoke has forever given nicotine a negative connotation. Here’s hoping that Dr. Newhouse’s research team discovers a miraculously marvelous medical breakthrough that can benefit Alzheimer’s patients around the world and for generations to come.  Well done, Dr. Newhouse.  Well done.  Related Article: VAPING & DEPRESSION: VANDERBILT STUDY FOCUSES ON NICOTINE AS ANTI-DEPRESSANT (Image courtesy of Shutterstock)

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Attention Vapers: Beware of misleading CDC reports regarding ’59 vape shops’: The vaping community seems to be always under attack, and this time the culprit may be the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).  This government agency is notorious for publishing intentionally misleading or falsified reports which suggest that vaping is not a reliable tobacco harm reduction tool. The latest is a recently published report regarding the surveillance and inspection of some 59 vape shops across the country. According to an article published on the CDC website, officials conducting the alleged inspections found enormous amounts of violations regarding “lack of quality assurance programs, standard operating procedures, and full labeling of ingredients by the inspected manufacturers.”  Specifics of the alleged violations include the failure of vape shops to test and validate the nicotine concentrations in e-liquid inventories, improper labeling of e-liquids ingredients, and non-adherence to other FDA deeming regulations. Why is the ’59 vape shops’ article by the CDC misleading? There are several reasons why the CDC report is suspect, to say the least.  Firstly, the inspections of 59 vape shops took place between October and November of 2016 – almost two-years ago.  This timeframe is just shortly after the FDA deeming regulations were first announced and well before they actually went into effect. In fact, the new FDA labeling requirements only officially went into effect a few short weeks ago.  Related Article: Surge in FDA inspections of vape shops & manufacturers reaches new high The CDC report is entitled Notes from the Field: Inspection of 59 “Vape Shops” — United States, October–November, 2016.  While the title does reference the fact that these inspections took place in 2016, the bulk of the report is written to imply that they only recently took place. Furthermore, the large number of alleged 2-year-old violations did not occur from a total of 59 vape shops as implied the title.   In fact, over half of the inspected vape shops did not warrant any significantly negative findings whatsoever.  It is only after reading over 300-words and three paragraphs of gibberish that the reader discovers that only 28 of the 59 vape shops were adversely affected – adversely affected by FDA deeming regulations that were largely not even active at the time of the inspections. “The 59 inspected shops included 31 retailers that only sold finished products, 27 that were both manufacturers and retailers, and one manufacturer that did not sell to consumers. Personnel at all shops reported being aware of FDA tobacco product regulation. The remainder of this report focuses on the 28 manufacturers” The vaping community should beware of anti-vaping activists discovering this CDC report and intentionally spinning its content to favor their vaping-hating agendas.   If recent history is any indication, the chances of this happening are very great.  As an example, a CDC spokesperson once falsely claimed in 2016 – around the same time as these 59 inspections – that “just reducing the number (of smoked cigarettes) doesn't reduce health risks…You have to quit completely."  This statement, of course, is patently untrue and was already proven to be untrue at the time of his statement. Related Article:  CDC spokesperson blatantly lies about smoking during Deseret News interview
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