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Becoming legally Japanese
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It was a lot of fun researching this: went to cemeteries (you can see the shots), libraries to read old books, and went on a few tangents with history related to other foreigners and The Japan Times during World War 2. I'm amazed that the Japan Times wrote almost nothing about this man (one article, no obit), yet the New York Times covered these men in more detail.
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Here's what should be a simple and obvious tip: if you didn't do anything other than spend money to get the passport, and that passport requires no commitment of anything other than money from you going forward, then that nationality is probably worthless in the eyes of the rest of the world community. More info: http://www.turning-japanese.info/2013/04/is-it-possible-to-just-buy-citizenship.html
Hip hop star Mos Def was detained at Cape Town International Airport after handing over an unrecognized 'world passport' instead of a real one, officials said.
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REPOST: my original chosen host moved or removed the content, so I'll reposting this, with the original source: This is a nice U.S. article about naturalized Japanese national Donald Keene (official legal Japanese name: キーン ドナルド). He's a living legend, and prior to becoming legally Japanese, he had received numerous national awards and honorary citizenship for his writings:
In this Monday, Dec. 28, 2015 photo, Donald Keene speaks during an interview at his home in Tokyo. Keene persevered, arriving in the ancient Japanese imperial capital of Kyoto in 1953 to do research. From those beginnings he counts about 25 books in English and 30 in Japanese and more than six ...
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Humor break. And now for something completely silly: a Tom Monroe "interpretation" of the eighties hit "Turning Japanese" by the Vapors. Trigger warning: the Caucasian women in kimonos might be viewed as microaggression by a few sensitive souls (probably not by anybody who's Japanese in Japan, though). Oh, you silly SCTV. Don't ever change.
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Sometimes, people do react to what you write. BBC journalist Barford read our article and corrected (by erasing the incorrect sentence) the article and properly noting it in the article: a rarity in 21st century journalism it seems. Thank you, Ms. Barford!
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Andy Kitkowski's profile photoBecoming legally Japanese's profile photo
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+Andy Kitkowski I'll let you know when I get the Cease & Desist letter. ;)
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According to our web analytics, our article about Japanese seals/hanko/inkan/chops has always been very popular, even though having one is not a requirement or a result of Japanese naturalization, and often times the seal doesn't even need to change when you become Japanese. However, we just updated the article slightly: we talk about "correction seals" (訂正印) as a variant of 認印 (personal acknowledgement seals) and note that the article is talking primarily about personal seals, not corporate seals.
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Went to Tama Cemetary the other day to do some research on a naturalization subject biography I'll be publishing soon. His father, who lived in Japan but never naturalized, is located in the "foreigner" section of the cemetery. Interestingly, most of the headstones in the foreigner's area have Arabic and Islamic crescent symbols on them. This is because that religion doesn't allow for cremation, which is the most common form of burial in Japan. Burial is very expensive due to the scarcity of land in Japan, so only the wealthy and famous are buried in Tama. Another famous family, the Gorham family, is buried here (in the Japanese area, because they [husband & wife, originally American] naturalized): http://www.turning-japanese.info/2014/01/gorham.html
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TLDR for the article: Putin said that if he fulfilled the requirements that mere mortals must go through to get citizenship, then he can get citizenship too. Gerard Depardieu was a case of "extraordinary naturalization." He would be normal naturalization. If he was applying to Japan and not Russia, this would be the answer: http://www.turning-japanese.info/2012/06/do-rich-or-famous-get-to-skip.html

"I want to ask you about maybe having a passport to go back and forth so that I can do business," said Roy Jones Jr.
He added without a hint of irony: "because all the people here seem to love Roy Jones Jr and I love it when people love me."
Putin replied: "Your name is so famous for our sport lovers and lovers of box in Russia, and if you are to spend a significant part of your life in Russia doing your business, then I surely will be glad to satisfy your request about receiving Russian passport and Russian citizenship.
I believe that the lovers of boxing would be very happy about that."
Former world boxing champion Roy Jones Jr. asked Putin for a Russian passport to visit his fans because "I love it when people love me"
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We've seen a lot of references to this article recently, so we've updated it with more information: "Why aren't Koreans/Chinese born and raised in Japan citizens?"
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BlJ gets referenced in a Snopes article regarding Japan Muslim Myths.
Contrary to popular meme, Japan has not been able to "keep Islam at bay" by enforcing strict laws on Muslims.
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TAO Yuichi (taoy)'s profile photoKen Yasumoto-Nicolson's profile photo
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A surprisingly bad error for a scholar of international law (and a top tier journalism organization) to make. Despite that one glaring error made by +vanessa barford 's lack of fact checking, the rest of the article on the vagueness of the meaning of "natural born citizen" in the U.S. and other world constitutions is interesting. FYI, Japan's constitution makes no mention or requirement for people to be "natural born" to be PM.
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As Christmas is not a national holiday in Japan, I thought I'd acknowledge that by posting an article today.
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Have them in circles
745 people
Jesse Hummer's profile photo
Vijay Raj's profile photo
Budi Syaf's profile photo
otsukare sama's profile photo
Jamie Clark's profile photo
Robert Cosmidis's profile photo
Md Anwar Hossin's profile photo
Citizenship School's profile photo
Vasil Popovski's profile photo
Communities
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Instructions on how to get Japanese citizenship via naturalization.
Introduction
Most documentation for naturalization is printed on paper, and in Japanese (or Chinese / Korean). Our site attempts to explain, in English, how to qualify, and how and what to do to prepare for naturalization. Additionally, experiences from other English writers who have done the process are included. We hope to dispel myths and rumors regarding how one becomes Japanese.

WE DO NOT COVER VISAS OR PERMANENT RESIDENCY.