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The News Literacy Project
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"The problem with stories like these is that the initial impressions stick, and the corrections don't."

Pervasive mistakes in the news shouldn't be celebrated, but a commitment to transparency should be. A reporter candidly admits his mistakes on a too-good-to-be-true story about the Secret Service. This is a great example of how news can be provisional (it can change) and a reminder to always check it out.
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A new +American Press Institute study finds that millennials are consuming a healthy mix of news on social media.
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As promised, another addition to our Learn Channel.

In this interactive lesson, +Walt Mossberg of +Re/code explores the meaning of journalistic independence and its value to news consumers.
About · Mission and Rationale · Program · Partner News Organizations · Board · Staff · Darragh Worland · Mary Lynn Hickey · Maureen Freeman · Tim Mata · Advisory Committees · NLP in the News · FishbowlLA · National Endowment for Democracy · Global News Literacy Roundtable Discussion on C-SPAN ...
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Last chance to sign up for the final session in our professional development series. The topic is 21st-Century Trends, Tools and Skills. It starts tomorrow night at 3 p.m. PT/5 p.m. CT/6 p.m. ET
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Mistakes, innocent or not, have the potential to undermine the credibility that news organizations work hard to build.
Veterans challenged Mr. Williams’s assertion that he made a mistake when he spoke about having been in a military helicopter forced down by enemy fire in 2003.
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A viral myth from the pre-internet days.
In 1862, a Union soldier entered the U.S. Capitol, never to be seen again. Or did he?
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Have them in circles
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With help from +Darryl Holliday and Jamie Hibdon of The Illustrated Press, we're presenting an online lesson about comics journalism to students in New York City, Chicago and Rockford, IL.
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We are happy to be partnering with the American Society of News Editors and the +American Press Institute  on the National Community and News Literacy Roundtables Project.
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In the newest addition to our Learn Channel, the +Chicago Public Library helps us figure out just how credible Wikipedia can be.

Check back in with us tomorrow for more new content on our Learn Channel.
About · Mission and Rationale · Program · Partner News Organizations · Board · Staff · Darragh Worland · Mary Lynn Hickey · Maureen Freeman · Tim Mata · Advisory Committees · NLP in the News · FishbowlLA · National Endowment for Democracy · Global News Literacy Roundtable Discussion on C-SPAN ...
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For those of us who care deeply about American journalism, the past two weeks have been brutal.
 
The dispiriting sequence of events began with the Feb. 4 revelation by Brian Williams, the anchor and managing editor of the “NBC Nightly News,” that he had made misstatements about taking enemy fire in Iraq and perhaps about other events that he had covered. This represents a serious self-inflicted wound to the credibility of one of the country's most high-profile newsmen and respected news organizations. Such episodes take a toll that casts a shadow over all journalists who dedicate themselves to telling the truth.
 
This week brought the tragic death on Wednesday of Bob Simon of "60 Minutes," an intrepid and distinguished correspondent who spent 47 years at CBS News. He traveled the world, from Vietnam to Northern Ireland to Iraq, to bear witness to history. He was aptly rewarded with 27 Emmy Awards for his meticulous reporting and skillful storytelling. His own story was a journalistic profile in courage.
 
Even as we reeled from Simon's loss, we learned of David Carr's sudden death yesterday. An American original, Carr covered, and analyzed, the news media for The New York Times, and did so like no one else — with brilliant insight and a distinctive, often irreverent, voice. He himself was an uncanny combination of the profound and the profane. He held those who fell short of journalism's ideals accountable and celebrated those who lived up to them. A.O. Scott, his fellow critic at The New York Times, aptly called him "a warrior for the truth."
 
For those of us who are deeply invested in teaching the next generation about news literacy, or how to know what to believe in the digital age, the past two weeks have been filled with teachable moments.
 
The disclosures about Brian Williams' self-aggrandizing tales underscore the price to be paid for misleading the public from a position of trust and the speed at which credibility earned over decades can be severely damaged, if not demolished. Bob Simon's track record underscores the enormous value to the public of a journalism career that brought light to some of the world's darkest corners for nearly half a century. The tributes to David Carr highlight the indispensable role that a dedicated media watchdog plays in the nation's public life.
 
Even as we grieve for what has been lost, it is worth taking these lessons to heart.

— Alan C. Miller, President & CEO, The News Literacy Project
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The newest addition to our staff.
About · Mission and Rationale · Program · Partner News Organizations · Board · Staff · Darragh Worland · Mary Lynn Hickey · Maureen Freeman · Tim Mata · Advisory Committees · NLP in the News · FishbowlLA · National Endowment for Democracy · Global News Literacy Roundtable Discussion on C-SPAN ...
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The Christian Science Monitor's editorial board thinks that a drop in civic engagement might not be a distrust in democracy. It might mean that citizens, millennials in particular, have new expectations of what democracy should look like.
Global surveys show rising distrust of traditional democracy, and many institutions. Yet other indicators suggest young people want different types of civic engagement. The media must probe beyond the politics of conflict.
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Story
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Innovative national educational program that mobilizes seasoned journalists to work with educators to teach middle school and high school students how to sort fact from fiction in the digital age.
Introduction

Students learn how to distinguish verified information from raw information, spin, opinion and propaganda — whether they are using search engines to find websites with information about specific topics, checking a friend's Facebook page, viewing a video on YouTube, watching television news or reading a newspaper or blog post.

The project gives students the critical-thinking skills to become smarter and more frequent consumers of credible information across all media and platforms. They are taught to seek news and information that will make them well-informed and engaged students, consumers and citizens.

They are also encouraged to produce news and information accurately, fairly and responsibly to make their own voices as credible and powerful as possible.

The project aspires to elevate the mission of news literacy nationally through classroom and after-school programs, digital units, workshops, public events and the news media itself.

We have created a new model by forging partnerships among active and retired journalists, NLP’s regional coordinators in New York City, Chicago and the Washington, D.C., area and English, history, government, humanities and journalism teachers. Journalist fellows and teachers are devising units focusing on the importance of news to young people, the role of the First Amendment and a free media in a democracy and ways to discern reliable information.

NLP has developed original curriculum material based on activities and student projects that build and reflect understanding of the program’s essential questions. Topics include viral email, Wikipedia, search engines, YouTube and the news. Lessons are presented through hands-on exercises, videos and the journalists’ own compelling stories. 

For more information, visit http://thenewsliteracyproject.org/about-us/mission-and-rationale