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Sussex Wildlife Trust
Non-Profit Organization
Today 9:00 am – 4:00 pm
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Sussex Wildlife Trust

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Four Hobbies have been seen regularly over the the pond at the end of the boardwalk giving wonderfully close views along with Swifts, House and Sand Martins. Also on the pond are the first brood of Mallards. Sedge and Reed warblers are now in full voice…
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Sussex Wildlife Trust

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Please watch and share this inspiring plea from a young naturalist calling on all politicians to Act for Nature

#ge2015   #nature   #wildlifewednesday  
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Sussex Wildlife Trust

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BBC #Countryfile visit Levin Down nature reserve #Chichester
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Sussex Wildlife Trust

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What’s your Wild Life?
All our lives are better when they’re a bit wild
We want to show how much nature matters to all our lives, so we’re showcasing hundreds of stories from all walks of life to show how nature is helping us all, everyday. Tell us why wildlife and wild places matter to you, read the stories, or share your wild life with us
http://www.mywildlife.org.uk/
#MyWildLife   #Nature  
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Sussex Wildlife Trust

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Local ceramicist Helen Hodson has kindly donated three of her blue baby badgers to support the Sussex Wildlife Trust’s Sussex Badger appeal.

If you would like the chance to give one of our badgers a home please bid to our Blind Auction here: http://www.sussexwildlifetrust.org.uk/blog/2015/01/bid-for-a-badger/

#Bid4Badger   #Badger   #Sussex  
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Sussex Wildlife Trust

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It has been a beautiful frosty week at Woods Mill nature reserve

#winter   #wildlife   #sussex  
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Have them in circles
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Sussex Wildlife Trust

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Weasel on a woodpecker flies again thanks to a Sussex potter.
Helen Hodson was so inspired by WeaselPecker, so re-created the pair in clay and is now auctioning her creation in aid of the Sussex Wildlife Trust. You can bid here: http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Weaselpecker-hanging-ceramic-sculpture-by-Helen-Hodson-/231542205736

Find out more about #WeaselPecker here: http://www.sussexwildlifetrust.org.uk/blog/2015/04/the-return-of-weaselpecker/

#weasel   #woodpecker   #wildlifewednesday  
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Sussex Wildlife Trust

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April has seen a rapid acceleration in wildlife activity, as the increased amount of sunlight and rise in temperatures triggers natural growth and animal behaviour. It has been a particularly good month for early blossoming trees and shrubs, such as…
April has seen a rapid acceleration in wildlife activity, as the increased amount of sunlight and rise in temperatures triggers natural growth and animal behaviour. It has been a particularly good ...
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Sussex Wildlife Trust

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Sunrise at The Seven Sisters, as we conduct a rockpool survey as part of the Beachy Head West Marine Conservation Zone in East Sussex
Please show your support for creating more Marine Conservation Zones here: http://www.wildlifetrusts.org/saveMCZs

#saveMCZs   #Sussex   #sunrise  
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Sussex Wildlife Trust

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Sussex Wildlife Trust's CEO, Dr Tony Whitbread, discusses the spread of ash dieback 
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Sussex Wildlife Trust

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Visit www.sussexwildlifetrust.org.uk tomorrow to find out more

#Bid4Badger   #Sussex   #Badger  
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Sussex Wildlife Trust

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Better habitat = more birds
Good news from Rye Harbour nature reserve, where many of the bird species that we manage the reserve for are increasing in number.
http://www.sussexwildlifetrust.org.uk/blog/2015/01/better-habitat-more-birds/

#birds   #conservation   #wildlife  
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Contact Information
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Woods Mill Shoreham Rd Henfield, West Sussex BN5 9SD, United Kingdom
Shoreham RoadGBWest SussexHenfieldBN5 9SD
Non-Profit Organization, Charity
Non-Profit Organization
Charity
Nature Preserve
Today 9:00 am – 4:00 pm
Monday 9:00 am – 4:00 pmTuesday 9:00 am – 4:00 pmWednesday 9:00 am – 4:00 pmThursday 9:00 am – 4:00 pmFriday 9:00 am – 1:00 pmSaturday ClosedSunday Closed
Sussex Wildlife Trust. For everyone who cares about nature in Sussex.
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Have them in circles
3,437 people
Ida damayanti's profile photo
「金持ち父さん」のための読書術!'s profile photo
Kumar Vipul's profile photo
Ahmed Senani's profile photo
Mark O' Mahony's profile photo
Hubble & Hattie's profile photo
Ron Pedigo's profile photo
Rico Fillsack's profile photo
Brian Smith's profile photo
All reviews
Jenny Taylor
in the last week
This is a very specific review concerning the activities of the Sussex Wildlife Trust (SWL) on the Ashdown Forest in East Sussex, where they have established a stronghold (reserve?) referred to on their website as Old Lodge. If you were to visit their site and check out the few elements of it that function correctly, you'd realise they have their fingers in a number of pies. This leads to a superficial understanding of several issues, but a knowledge of virtually none. Unfortunately this is evidenced by their attitude and activities in an area of the Sussex countryside that has been shaped by human interaction over thousands of years, yet remains a uniquely wild area within an overcrowded region of the southern UK. The countryside is not a playground for those with expensive cameras and long lenses to enjoy in their spare time. It is a living and breathing entity that includes and exists because of those who have lived, loved, walked and worked in a particular region though all weathers and at every time of the day, often over decades and for generations. The SWL can claim little regard for history or how this ecosystem has survived untarnished before they came along. They talk about access yet the reserve is heavily fenced, in a part of the world that has always been proud to let people and animals wander unhindered. Dogs are supposed to be kept on a tight leash, while throughout the rest of Ashdown Forest they must simply be under control, as on paths and firebreaks they do no harm whatsoever and enhance the amenity value of this wonderful area. So-called ponds have been dug to attract dragonflies, yet as these never existed previously, few will be flooded throughout the time it takes a dragonfly nymph to develop, while the marshy ground and streams elsewhere remain as full of these insects as they always were. Exmoor ponies have been introduced from Devon and Charolais cows from France, while the evocative silver birch woodland is being decimated in favour of the ecological disaster that is pine. Nesting boxes have been nailed up everywhere and remain almost universally empty, while the birdlife advertised on the SWL website is for those who visit regularly, only notable by its absence. In short, this reserve is an unmitigated disaster from almost every point of view. Sure the scenery is beautiful, but there is much more of it nearby, without the limitations imposed by a few misguided fanatics. This is an excellent example of the blind leading the blind, to the detriment of the countryside and all wildlife. Those who know the area like the back of their hand, cannot but long for the bad weather and dark evenings of winter, when such individuals are no longer around.
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A Google User
3 years ago
An amazing place to visit! highly recommend it.