Profile

Cover photo
Verified local business
Sussex Wildlife Trust
Non-Profit Organization
Today Closed
3,537 followers|914,897 views
AboutPostsPhotosYouTube

Stream

Sussex Wildlife Trust

Shared publicly  - 
 
The Wilderness Wonder Charity Ball
1
Add a comment...

Sussex Wildlife Trust

Shared publicly  - 
 
Graffham Common nature reserve management
1
Add a comment...

Sussex Wildlife Trust

Shared publicly  - 
 
What's On in 2016

Have you ever heard a nightingale’s sing, seen a glow-worm glow, watched badgers emerging in the twilight or seen purple emperors soaring in the treetops? Get closer to nature with our wildlife experts

https://sussexwildlifetrust.org.uk/news/fill-your-head-with-wildlife-in-2016
2
Add a comment...

Sussex Wildlife Trust

Shared publicly  - 
 
A whole generation of children is growing up without ever having experienced the natural world and the great outdoors. It’s deeply worrying for the future of the wildlife all around us.
https://www.sussexwildlifetrust.org.uk/newgeneration

That’s why here at Sussex Wildlife Trust we urgently need to reach out to thousands of children across the county and engage them in the natural beauty and wonders all around them. In fact, in 2016 we want to get 17,000 schoolchildren connected with and inspired by nature, but it’s going to mean raising £100,000 to do it. That’s why we need your help today.

By making a donation today, your gift will inspire children today – and help save wildlife and habitats tomorrow: https://www.sussexwildlifetrust.org.uk/newgeneration
1
Add a comment...

Sussex Wildlife Trust

Shared publicly  - 
 
As the weather hots up, please remember to put out water for thirsty wildlife

#heatwave   #Sussex   #wildlifewednesday  
2
Tanja Glittenberg's profile photo
 
I got a pond, bird bath plus a stainless steel cat bowl on the bird table to keep all my visitors hydrated. ☺
Add a comment...

Sussex Wildlife Trust

Shared publicly  - 
 
Four Hobbies have been seen regularly over the the pond at the end of the boardwalk giving wonderfully close views along with Swifts, House and Sand Martins. Also on the pond are the first brood of Mallards. Sedge and Reed warblers are now in full voice…
1
Add a comment...
Have them in circles
3,537 people
Stephanie Hermes's profile photo
Tours4Fun's profile photo
Pu Alger's profile photo
Elvin Prasad's profile photo
Prasanth G's profile photo
Drew Shoemaker's profile photo
Universal Recycling & Scrap Iron Corporation's profile photo
CNN Ethiopia's profile photo
peter ron's profile photo

Sussex Wildlife Trust

Shared publicly  - 
 
Dormouse on a Sussex Wildlife Trust nature reserve
1
Add a comment...

Sussex Wildlife Trust

Shared publicly  - 
 
TinyBirder wanted to show you how much fun it is to dissect barn #owl pellets, so he made a short video.

https://youtu.be/6tCVx2p-X-g
1
Add a comment...

Sussex Wildlife Trust

Shared publicly  - 
 
#Flooding: the inconvenient truth
Read Tony Whitbread's blog to find out why rivers flood and why dredging isn't the answer : https://www.sussexwildlifetrust.org.uk/news/flooding-the-inconvenient-truth

photo: Robert Maynard
1
Add a comment...

Sussex Wildlife Trust

Shared publicly  - 
 
Battling butterflies
1
akouètè roméo sessou's profile photo
 
Country:Togo
Message:
tutti fratelli  hello my name is romeo voluntary Sessou of the Togolese Red Cross  I volunteer as HANRY Dunard  j have my card rescuer  de member and the diploma of the cross-rouge tous just join you in your country to continue my work thank you benevole touti romsessou@gmail com 0022890880317 0022896302530
Add a comment...

Sussex Wildlife Trust

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
Poppy Fields at Blackpatch Covert - South Downs Walks. New blog post.
Springtime was very much over, the bright yellow fields of rapeseed all but vanished from the South Downs National Park. Swaying fields of wheat, a contrasting lush green under hot yellow summer sun now covered the landscape.

Splattered like random giant paint drops, amongst these fields of green were vivid red poppies, emerging from the disturbed land adding a dash of brilliant colour.

Finding the South Downs Poppies.

I hadn't planned on discovering poppies on this walk, I was heading to Blackpatch Hill because I enjoy the peaceful location.
#southdowns   #sussex   #poppies  
An 11.49 mile walk to Blackpatch Hill in the West Sussex South Downs. I saw fields of poppies and wheat along my walk. Words, photos and maps from my trip.
3 comments on original post
1
Add a comment...

Sussex Wildlife Trust

Shared publicly  - 
 
Weasel on a woodpecker flies again thanks to a Sussex potter.
Helen Hodson was so inspired by WeaselPecker, so re-created the pair in clay and is now auctioning her creation in aid of the Sussex Wildlife Trust. You can bid here: http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Weaselpecker-hanging-ceramic-sculpture-by-Helen-Hodson-/231542205736

Find out more about #WeaselPecker here: http://www.sussexwildlifetrust.org.uk/blog/2015/04/the-return-of-weaselpecker/

#weasel   #woodpecker   #wildlifewednesday  
3
Add a comment...
Contact Information
Map of the business location
Woods Mill Shoreham Rd Henfield BN5 9SD, UK
Shoreham RoadGBHenfieldBN5 9SD
Non-Profit Organization, Charity
Non-Profit Organization
Charity
Nature Preserve
Today Closed
Sunday ClosedMonday 9AM–4PMTuesday 9AM–4PMWednesday 9AM–4PMThursday 9AM–4PMFriday 9AM–4PMSaturday Closed
Google+ URL

Street View

Panorama
Your Activity
Write a review
Review Summary
4 reviews
"An amazing place to visit! highly recommend it."
"A small, near perfect haven of green."
"Go figure on this one folks, and the ecological disaster that is pine."
Photos
Scrapbook photo 2
Scrapbook photo 3
Scrapbook photo 4
Scrapbook photo 5
Scrapbook photo 6
Upload public photo
People
Have them in circles
3,537 people
Stephanie Hermes's profile photo
Tours4Fun's profile photo
Pu Alger's profile photo
Elvin Prasad's profile photo
Prasanth G's profile photo
Drew Shoemaker's profile photo
Universal Recycling & Scrap Iron Corporation's profile photo
CNN Ethiopia's profile photo
peter ron's profile photo
All reviews
Jenny Taylor's profile photo
Jenny Taylor
a year ago
Edit === Since there is no facility to post a follow-up response and my initial review was severely truncated anyway, I should like to advise the so-called Sussex Wildlife Trust of the following, in numerical order as per their polemic. 1. Grazing on the Ashdown Forest was traditionally cattle, pigs and subsequently sheep. However, Charolais from France and Exmoor ponies from Devon were never involved. Is that why you need to fence them in? 2. Dogs run on the paths and firebreaks, where no birds nest whatsoever. Adders are found all over the Ashdown Forest, so don't feign concern on that front, lol... 3. The so-called ponds at Old Lodge are generally stagnant and for the most part dry in summer. This is of no use to the life cycle of a dragonfly nymph, although they continue to flourish outside of your so-called 'reserve'. 4. The ironically named Trust almost universally fells silver birch, present on the Ashdown Forest since Neolithic times for certain, not pine as they suggest. Go figure on this one folks, and the ecological disaster that is pine. 5. We heard a cuckoo at Old Lodge this year for the first time in decades, while others report having noted this bird for maybe the past three years. The other species mentioned we have unfortunately never witnessed in over five decades of living and walking on the Ashdown Forest, an area notorious for its lack of avian activity. 6. Scientific research, you say? Historical research might stand you in better stead. In short, the whole Ashdown Forest looks spectacular at any time. To quote your chief executive Tony Whitbread: “In general, nature conservation is moving out of nature reserves and restoring a living landscape across the whole environment.” Thank you so much! [Edit End] This is a very specific review concerning the activities of the Sussex Wildlife Trust (SWL) on the Ashdown Forest in East Sussex, where they have established a stronghold (reserve?) referred to on their website as Old Lodge. If you were to visit their site and check out the few elements of it that function correctly, you'd realise they have their fingers in a number of pies. This leads to a superficial understanding of several issues, but a knowledge of virtually none. Unfortunately this is evidenced by their attitude and activities in an area of the Sussex countryside that has been shaped by human interaction over thousands of years, yet remains a uniquely wild area within an overcrowded region of the southern UK. The countryside is not a playground for those with expensive cameras and long lenses to enjoy in their spare time. It is a living and breathing entity that includes and exists because of those who have lived, loved, walked and worked in a particular region though all weathers and at every time of the day, often over decades and for generations. The SWL can claim little regard for history or how this ecosystem has survived untarnished before they came along. They talk about access yet the reserve is heavily fenced, in a part of the world that has always been proud to let people and animals wander unhindered. Dogs are supposed to be kept on a tight leash, while throughout the rest of Ashdown Forest they must simply be under control, as on paths and firebreaks they do no harm whatsoever and enhance the amenity value of this wonderful area. So-called ponds have been dug to attract dragonflies, yet as these never existed previously, few will be flooded throughout the time it takes a dragonfly nymph to develop, while the marshy ground and streams elsewhere remain as full of these insects as they always were. Exmoor ponies have been introduced from Devon and Charolais cows from France, while the evocative silver birch woodland is being decimated in favour of the ecological disaster that is pine. Nesting boxes have been nailed up everywhere and remain almost universally empty, while the birdlife advertised on the SWL website is for those who visit regularly, only notable by its absence. In short, this reserve is an unmitigated disaster from almost every point of view...
• • •
Response from the owner - a year ago
Here is our response to some of comments raised in Jenny Taylor's review. 1. The reserve is fenced to allow our grazing animals to be safe and at the correct density to help manage the reserve for the rare wildlife found there. As Jenny states the heath landscape of the Ashdown Forest was created by humans clearing the woodland, grazing management allows to rare heathland plants and animals to survive. 2. We require dogs to be kept on a lead during the nesting season. Many rare heathland birds, such as the woodlark, are ground nesting and easily disturbed by running dogs. Also adders are found at this nature reserve. 3. The ponds at Old Lodge have been a great success, many rare dragonflies now thrive at this site and it is one of the best places for dragonflies on the Ashdown Forest. 4. The pine at Old Lodge is an old plantation, which was planted before the Trust was involved in the site, the Trust has cleared much of this pine from the site and is restoring these areas to heathland. 5. Old Lodge is great for birdlife, nightjar, woodcock, stonechat, cuckoo etc can all be seen at this site. 6. All management decisions are based on scientific research, copies of the Old Lodge management plan are available to view at the Trust's Woods Mill offices Old Lodge nature reserve is certainly worth a visit, it is interesting at all times of the year, but looks spectacular in the late summer when the heather is in flower. Visit our webpage here: https://www.sussexwildlifetrust.org.uk/visit/old-lodge
A Google User
4 years ago
An amazing place to visit! highly recommend it.
Richard Perrin's profile photo
Richard Perrin
a month ago
A small, near perfect haven of green.
Paul Fallows's profile photo
Paul Fallows
a month ago