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As legacy media cuts back on FOIA, digital-only news outlets step in. Non-Residential Fellow Nabiha Syed comments.

http://www.cjr.org/first_person/foia_requests_down_legacy.php
Ask any journalist and they'll tell you the Freedom of Information Act process is broken. Denials are at record highs, navigating the bureaucracy can be a nightmare, and the federal agencies recently killed a modest reform bill. But...
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Leave the cheaters in peace: If you poke around the Ashley Madison data, you're aiding and abetting the hackers. New op-ed from Affiliate Scholar Danielle Citron and Maram Salaheldin.

http://www.nydailynews.com/opinion/citron-salaheldin-leave-cheaters-peace-article-1.2333852
When a person’s confidential data is exposed in violation of a legitimate expectation of privacy, it shouldn’t matter whether that person
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Affiliate Scholar Ryan Calo tells the Meanwhile in the Future podcast that the way we regulate drones can, and probably will change in the future.

http://gizmodo.com/meanwhile-in-the-future-everybody-has-a-personal-drone-1726343769
There are a million ways people might use drones in the future, from deliveries and police work to journalism. But in this episode, we’re going to talk about consumer drones — something that you or I might use for ourselves. What does the world look like when everybody with a smart phone also has a drone?
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"State-Level Cyber Security Efforts: The Garden State Model". New blog post from Affiliate Scholar Brian Nussbaum.

http://cyberlaw.stanford.edu/blog/2015/08/state-level-cyber-security-efforts-garden-state-model
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New paper now available from Affiliate Scholar @MiquelP, "The Shaky Ground of the Right to Be Delisted".

https://cyberlaw.stanford.edu/blog/2015/08/new-paper-shaky-ground-right-be-delisted
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Facebook wasn’t great at respecting privacy in the first place. It’s gotten much worse. New op-ed by Affiliate Scholar Henry Farrell.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/monkey-cage/wp/2015/08/18/facebook-wasnt-great-at-respecting-privacy-in-the-first-place-its-gotten-much-worse/
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Have them in circles
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Autonomous driving and the law: Who's responsible when there's a machine at the wheel? Automotive News interviews Affiliate Scholar Bryant Walker Smith.

http://www.autonews.com/article/20150824/OEM06/308249984/autonomous-driving-and-the-law-whos-responsible-when-theres-a
Drivers cause accidents, accidents cause injuries and injuries cause lawsuits. But if the advent of autonomous vehicles means cars increasingly control themselves, who is liable when something goes bump?
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Affiliate Scholar Peter Asaro told Vocativ “We are probably a long way from robots that could trick people into doing things that are good for them—they would need much better capabilities for reading social cues, using social cues, as well as deciphering and manipulating human desires and incentives,”

http://www.vocativ.com/news/224779/the-air-force-wants-you-to-trust-robots-should-you/
Research and development in human-robot trust is the cutting edge of artificial intelligence, but faith in machines can often be misplaced
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Government Cheating on the Sotomayor Surveillance Scale. Latest blog post from Affiliate Scholar Jeffrey Vagle now available.

https://cyberlaw.stanford.edu/blog/2015/08/government-cheating-sotomayor-surveillance-scale
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Last chance! Apply before 12pm PST for our Cryptography Research Fellow position.

https://cyberlaw.stanford.edu/page/cryptography-research-fellow
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Predator Drone Maker General Atomics Flying Spy Missions For the Pentagon. Affiliate Scholar Patrick Lin weighs in.

http://www.defenseone.com/technology/2015/08/predator-maker-flying-spy-missions-pentagon/119272/
The US military has hired General Atomics to fly some missions — just ISR so far, but what about the future?
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“People ask me if I’m concerned about automated vehicles. Yes. But I’m terrified of today’s vehicles. Thirty-three thousand people in the U.S. are killed every year in car accidents, and (more than) a million are injured.” said Affiliate Scholar Bryant Walker Smith.

http://www.kansascity.com/living/article31328087.html
It seems like a fantasy. Sit back and watch a movie while your self-driving car chauffeurs you around. Actually, it’s closer to reality. Major companies are betting billions that the future of driving is driverless.
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Have them in circles
171 people
Jeff Keltner's profile photo
Stephane Beladaci (flexengineer)'s profile photo
Franz Grzeschniok's profile photo
Petteri Günther's profile photo
Peter Fry's profile photo
Joseph Dempsey's profile photo
Christie Dudley's profile photo
Shrey goswami's profile photo
김창호's profile photo
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CIS is a leader in the study of the law and policy around the Internet and other emerging technologies.
Introduction
Founded in 2000 by Lawrence LEssig, the Center for Internet and Society (CIS) is a public interest technology law and policy program at Stanford Law School and a part of Law, Science and Technology Program at Stanford Law School. CIS brings together scholars, academics, legislators, students, programmers, security researchers, and scientists to study the interaction of new technologies and the law and to examine how the synergy between the two can either promote or harm public goods like free speech, innovation, privacy, public commons, diversity, and scientific inquiry. CIS strives to improve both technology and law, encouraging decision makers to design both as a means to further democratic values. CIS provides law students and the general public with educational resources and analyses of policy issues arising at the intersection of law, technology and the public interest. Through the Fair Use Project and the Cyberlaw Clinic, CIS also provides legal representation to clients in matters that raise important issues of free expression, civil rights and technology. CIS also sponsors a range of public events including a speakers series, conferences and workshops.