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srivas venkatesh
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srivas venkatesh

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Tensor Processing Units (TPUs)
I'm very excited that we can finally discuss this in public. Today at Google I/O +Sundar Pichai revealed the TPU (Tensor Processing Unit), a custom ASIC that Google has designed and built specifically for machine learning applications. We've had TPUs deployed in Google datacenters for more than a year, and they are an order of magnitude faster and more power efficient per operation than other computational solutions for the kinds of models we are deploying to improve our products. This computational speed allows us to use larger, more powerful machine learned models, expressed and seemlessly deployed using TensorFlow (tensorflow.org) into our products, and to deliver the excellent results from those models in less time.

TPUs are used on every Google Search to power RankBrain (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RankBrain), they were a key secret ingredient in the recent AlphaGo match against Lee Sedol, they are used for speech and image recognition, and they are powering a growing list of other smart products and features.

+Norm Jouppi and the rest of the team that developed this ASIC did a fabulous job, and it's great to see it discussed in public!

Blog post:
https://cloudplatform.googleblog.com/2016/05/Google-supercharges-machine-learning-tasks-with-custom-chip.html

Link to the part of the keynote where Sundar discusses TPUs:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=862r3XS2YB0&feature=youtu.be&t=7300

WSJ article:
http://www.wsj.com/articles/google-isnt-playing-games-with-new-chip-1463597820

Edit: Added a link and some text.
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From the article: There’s both the raw data from the detectors (so you can verify the results) and also “derived” datasets that are more easy to work with — and don’t worry, CERN is providing the tools to do so, as well. There’s a whole CERN Linux environment ready for booting up in a virtual machine, and a bunch of scripts and apps (some are on GitHub, too).
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There's an old bit of elementary-school folklore that you can't fold a piece of paper more than six times. And there's a mathematical theorem that shows exactly how many times you really can fold paper. And then there's the +Hydraulic Press Channel on YouTube, which decided to violate all the laws of mathematics and physics by brute force.

The result is a rather fascinating display of physics at work. I have a theory as to what's going on here, but I would need a hydraulic press, a thermocouple, and an electron microscope to be sure. (Anyone have these sitting around? This would be fun)

You can see the video, the math, and my proposed explanation here: https://medium.com/@yonatanzunger/folding-paper-with-a-hydraulic-press-c858f3d12a58#.n074iyfxv

Thanks to +Chris Colohan for finding this, and posing the challenging question of just what's going on here.
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Famous Chunkies credit to Alex solis
edited by me
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Smart Reply - a deep neural network that writes email

Replying to an emails on a mobile device can be a challenge, even for short replies. What if there were a system that could automatically determine if an email was answerable with a short reply, and compose a few suitable responses that you could edit or send with just a tap? 

Smart Reply, which will be launching later this week, is built on a pair of recurrent neural networks, one used to encode the incoming email and capture the gist of what is being said and the other to predict and compose grammatically correct possible responses. 

Head over to the Google Research blog to learn more.
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srivas venkatesh

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Learn more about the technology behind Allo, a new smart messaging app that uses the power of neural networks and Google Search to make your text conversations easier and more productive.
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Please Keep Your Eyes On The Cross

Staring at the cross causes your peripheral vision to confuse your brain, which then combines features from the different faces and makes them look distorted! XD
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In cold enough temperatures, hot water tossed into the air instantly turns into ice. That's what's captured in this beautiful photo by photographer Michael
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Interesting research! Must watch...
The Road Best Traveled: A Tale of Ants, Slime Mold and the New Jersey Turnpike
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In the category of "really weird things I did not know:" apparently figs and certain wasps have co-evolved into a sort of single organism, with the wasps acting as highly mobile sex organs. It's basically what happens if you take "insects pollinating flowers" to its logical conclusion.

Essentially, a female wasp shows up at a fig, pollen in tow and laden with egs, enters the fig, spreads the pollen around, lays her eggs, and dies. Some of the fig's ovaries are now fertilized by pollen; they develop seeds. Others have wasp eggs; they form a shell around the eggs. Male wasps hatch first; they have no wings, but instead travel around the inside of the fig, fertilize the females (still in their eggs), cut escape hatches for them, and then die. Next the male flowers mature and produce pollen. Next, the female wasps hatch, already fertilized; they get covered in pollen, and fly out, in search of another fig. The wasps which die in the fig get digested by it and turned into more fig.

Which is to say, the wasp's entire life cycle is basically loading up on the parts to make more wasps and more figs, and then finding a fig. 

There are a few variations on this, summarized in https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fig_wasp . But basically, figs have managed to turn wasps into part of their biology, and can be considered to be part-animal, part-plant. Others instead would say that the figs are eating the wasps, which I suppose is also true, but that really understates the complexity of this relationship.

Apparently this is also enough for some people to consider figs not to be vegan. (cf http://www.organicauthority.com/health/figs-are-they-vegan.html , although to make it clear I am not endorsing any of the, well, anything on this site; it's just an example of what arguments around the kosher vegan status of the fig look like)

Mostly, this gives me an urge for figs. 

Via @silentkpants on Twitter.
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Convenient Indian grocery store.
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Public - 3 months ago
reviewed 3 months ago
Healthy food options.
Public - 3 months ago
reviewed 3 months ago
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Beautiful theater. Leg room is less so legs might get numb if seated for too long but otherwise amazing.
Public - 2 months ago
reviewed 2 months ago
This place is really hit or miss at times. Serves food that is similar to Indian street food. But the dishes are sometimes good and sometimes bad (oily, tasteless food at times). Note for people that are sensitive to spicy food: most dishes here are quite spicy.
Public - 3 months ago
reviewed 3 months ago
Just like any other subway. Staff is quite friendly.
Public - 3 months ago
reviewed 3 months ago