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Shawna Coronado
460,762 followers -
Social media addict, green lifestyle author, on-camera spokesperson, gardener, professional photographer, culinary whiz, eco-traveler, blogger, content builder, and passionate, adventurous, risk-taking wildwoman.
Social media addict, green lifestyle author, on-camera spokesperson, gardener, professional photographer, culinary whiz, eco-traveler, blogger, content builder, and passionate, adventurous, risk-taking wildwoman.

460,762 followers
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My native geraniums are filled with color and garden love today. 💜💜💜💜💜
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#flowers #gardening #gardens #love #flowers #geranium #flowerphotography
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How to Garden Till-Free ----
When I tell people that I built a till-free vegetable garden in my front lawn they seem surprised and ask how I have growing success. From an ecological perspective turning the soil over is bad because all the millions of bacteria and micro life are killed when they are exposed to air and sunshine. It is this amazing tiny life in your soil - an entire ecosystem - that enables your plants to grow strong and happy. When you turn soil over it loses fertility and viability. Using a no-till or till-free gardening method can enable better success with plants and growing.

**Till-Free Layering Technique ---

As a part of my till-free gardening technique, I first removed the grass. Some people choose to keep it and simply solarize the grass or lay down a kill mulch such as cardboard over the top to kill it naturally. Once the grass was gone I began layering organic ingredients. This is easy to do - just add a new layer every season. The first season I laid out a layer of rotted manure and dried leaves. Next season I added a one inch layer of organic bagged soil. Then the next season I added a layer of mulch. Then the next season I added another layer of organic bagged soil. This technique of consistently adding new layers of soil, manure, and mulch without turning over the soil encourages the microbial growth beneath the soil's surface.

**Benefits of a till-free garden ---

SO IMPORTANT -- Benefits of a till-free garden include less watering, less weeding, and less need for fertilizer!!!!!

All of this is better for the environment and better for you because it saves you time and money. My front lawn garden is loose to the touch and very rich after ten years of building it up with natural organic ingredients. I added a 2 inch layer of Kellogg Garden Organics All Natural Garden Soil for my latest front lawn veg garden. If I can build a till-free vegetable garden, you can too!
#kellogggarden #ad #gardening #tillfree #notill
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5/17/18
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*How to Plant a Tomato with a Trench Technique*
For years I struggled with tomato drama. My tomatoes performed poorly, caught diseases, had issue after issue and I could not figure out what I was doing wrong. Then one day a very successful tomato growing friend of mine asked me HOW I was planting the tomatoes. My response, "Uhh.. dig a hole, add some fertilizer, throw in the plant." Her reply was a vehement, "NO NO NO NO NO NO! You must nurture the roots. In order to nurture the roots, you need to grow more of them so that the plant is stronger."

Turns out her theory was correct and this technique really helped; growing more roots is indeed very possible. When any part of a tomato plant touches the ground, particularly a stem, it will often take root. What if we kick-start that process by burying MORE of the stem in order to grow MORE roots? This is the idea behind trench planting and it truly makes for a stronger tomato plant. Watch the video below, sponsored by the Wave Petunia company and filmed in my front garden to learn easy tips and tricks for trench planting.

Special thanks to Wave® Petunias, The Organic Mechanics Soil Company, and VegTrug for contributing to this tomato planting project. #tomatoes #trench #ad #wavepetunias #organicmechanics #vegtrug
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5/5/18
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Hi all my peeps! Thanks for helping select my latest profile pic. :-)
This was taken in Ireland a few weeks ago when I went over for my daughters wedding.

My website - www.shawnacoronado.com
Photo location - Loughcrew House and Gardens., Loughcrew, Ireland.
Photo credit - the magnificent Stephanie Sunberg - hire her! Here's her website - https://www.stephaniesunberg.com.
Sweater -- *Where to get the sweater or one like it - www.arancrafts.com *
#newprofilepic #irish #sweater
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To Bug or Not to Bug... that is the question ----

Watching bugs in your organic garden is like watching a soap opera. There are good bugs and bad bugs, drama queens and sneaky culprits. Your garden is dripping with romance, excitement, and of course, murder on a daily basis - what a show! In the past I have essentially ignored pests and bugs or occasionally spot sprayed them with soapy water. Last season I noticed I had an overly prolific Cabbage Worm and Japanese Beetle population. It changes from season-to-season, but I have decided to take action and explore some ideas for more aggressive pest control so I can get rid of bugs in the garden organically.

Controlling the bad bugs without eliminating the good bugs is, without a doubt, the most important goal in organic garden pest management. Below are a few basic ideas for preventing bug invasion I’m going to try -

1. Flowers -- I'll be companion planting flowering plants around my herb and vegetable gardens in order to attract the bad bugs and pull them away from good plants. I want to research and plant companion plants such as dill, fennel, carrot, and parsley that function as hosts for braconid wasps and butterflies.
2. Row covers – I’ll try using floating row covers to prevent butterflies or moths from laying their eggs on crops
3. Eyeball it -- Inspect my herbs and vegetables for eggs and aphids regularly. According to experts you have a more likely chance at controlling an invader if you nip it in the bud immediately upon emergence.
4. Spot spray organically - This season I am also partnering with MGK Insect Control Solutions experimenting with two OMRI® listed botanical insecticides derived from chrysanthemums; Pyganic Gardening and Azera Gardening for organic gardens. Both products need to be directly sprayed. This is a good thing, because you do not want to spray your whole garden indiscriminately and kill the good bugs along with the bad bugs.

Here's a link to a more detailed blog post detailing organic pest control ideas - https://goo.gl/sFD8QR

***What are you doing in your garden this season to control the bad bugs and pests organically?***

#bugs #pests #MGK #ad #gardening
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HOW TO GROW Elephant Ears or Colocasia 'Thailand Giant' in a northern garden -- This variety of colocasia can reach nine feet high with leaves that are four feet wide and five feet tall. However, I've found it takes almost all my northern garden growing season to develop the larger leaves. Thailand Giant made a great show in my September garden (see above and below). It is definitely possible to grow colocasia in your northern garden and bring it back year-after-year if you plan to overwinter the rhizome of the plant.

Colocasia are fast growers in tropical climates, hardy to Zone 8 (10°F), and adore warm humid weather. Water and heat are friends to the colocasia and encourage stronger growth. While sun needs are disputed, I've found Colocasia 'Thailand Giant' does well in part-shade to full-sun. Plant your colocasia after all danger of frost is done and you are experiencing warm evenings. Temperatures must remain above 50°F for Thailand Giant to find success in the beds. Thailand Giant does well in a "rain garden" or damp or wet area in the garden. Some ponders even plant the colocasia in shallow water.

Once planted, fertilize regularly with organic fertilizer. When the weather starts to cool, store the plant bareroot in your basement or a cool, dark storage area. Dig up before the first frost, wash off the soil, then store in peat moss. Colocasia 'Thailand Giant' can be started again in a container next to a bright or sunny window in order to kick start the planting season. Put out in the garden after temperatures warm-up again over 50°F in the early summer.

Special thanks to +WaltersGardens for providing the Colocasia 'Thailand Giant' plants for my garden and +organicmechanicsoil for providing my organic worm-castings for the garden bed.

#colocasia #elephantears #ad #waltersgardens #organicmechanics #wormcastings
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One of the questions I get the most from readers is, "How do I plant up a container?" There are endless variations on planting designs and techniques we can go over, but I like to keep it simple. Originally coined "Thriller, Filler, Spiller", this Easy as 1 2 3 Container Garden Planting Technique is a super basic look at filling a planter and it works every time.

Easy as 1 2 3 Container Garden Planting Technique -
*Tall plants in the center
*Full plants in the middle layer
*Vining or spilling plants in the outer layer

There are those that claim this technique is boring or unimaginative. My answer to that is the technique is easy and because of this, it keeps more people growing - anything to inspire gardening helps beautify and keeps us healthy. So give it a try!
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#gardening #ad #containergardens #containergardening #garden #petunia #waverave #crescentgarden #organicmechanics
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4/11/18
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Ready for spring? I can't wait for warmth. One of the plants I love for warm weather container gardening I put out by my +Aquascape Inc rain water cistern - Colocasia 'Distant Memory' from +WaltersGardens is a beautiful tropical plant and works very well in containers. Leaves on the plant are a dark mahogany (almost black when exposed to stronger sun), the plant clumps which is particularly great in containers, and this tropical leafed plant truly adds an incredible boost to container gardens and garden beds alike.

Colocasia loves warm weather, sunshine, and water. Plant your Colocasia 'Distant Memory' in a moisture retentive soil combination after the last frost. I like to mix up a rich potting soil with this formula - one part potting soil, one part rotted manure, and one part compost. Throw in some worm castings and organic fertilizer as well and you will have an amazing growing medium for this very special plant.
LINK TO POST - goo.gl/PpU5MR
#colocasia #ad #gardening #containergardening
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Secret Soil Mix for Garden Success -
You can have great growing success in your container gardens and elevated beds if you plan the proper soil mix. My secret formula for moisture retentive soil which will give you a bit of leeway in watering frequency is made from 4 ingredients – 1 part organic soil + 1 part composted manure + 1 part compost (leaf mold or homemade compost) + a handful of worm castings. The goal is to hold as much moisture as possible around the root area while still allowing easy drainage.

In this elevated bed garden I used Kellogg Garden All Natural Raised Bed & Potting Mix and Organic Fertilizer. Once you mix the secret soil formula up in your elevated beds, it is time to plant the plants. Using my +VegTrug Ltd Elevated Bed, I fill it with my mix then add organic fertilizer according to directions. Simply loosen the roots and tuck in the plants. I used Parsley 'Giant of Italy', Thyme 'Red Creeping', Sage 'Tricolor', Oregano 'Golden', and Rosemary 'Tuscan Blue'. Water in well and you have yourself a beautiful garden!

#kellogggarden #ad #vegtrug #herbs #gardening #soil
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*HOW TO REBUILD A PERENNIAL GARDEN BED* ---
My front side yard had really gotten to a point of disrepair last season and want to show you how to rebuild a perennial garden bed. I decided to rebuild the garden so it presents better, will be drought tolerant, and is easier to maintain. I've been using till-free planting techniques for years and below I have a little guide on the steps I used to plant this garden in a till-free fashion.

*Steps to Plant the Garden --
-Dug holes for the perennial plants
-Added a layer of rotted manure and old leaves around the holes
-Planted the plants with a bit of organic fertilizer tossed in
-Layered cardboard down on the ground to act as a weed barrier in between plants
-Covered the cardboard with Organic Mechanics® Hardwood -Bark Mulch
-Watered the garden in well

*Plants used in this garden bed require full sun, are mostly drought tolerant, and all the perennials are very easy to maintain --
-Allium Millennium
-Coreopsis Cosmic eye
-Phlox 'Glamour Girl'
-Speedwell 'Blue Skywalker'
-Veronica 'White Wands'

Special thanks to Walters Gardens, Proven Winners, and The Organic Mechanics Soil Company for providing plants and mulch. #provenwinners #ad #organicmechanics #gardening
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3/13/18
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