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This cube is made of a new kind of metamaterial that can be designed to form any pattern.
Metamaterials don’t react the way you would expect. Push down on this cube from the top and a face appears on the side. The secret? A carefully designed substructure . This video was reproduced with permission and was first published on July 27, 2016. It is a Nature Video production.
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A grayish-silver shape shifting material? It's not intelligent, is it? The Sarah Connor's of the world don't need to go into hiding, do they?
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Pokémon Go might seem like augmented reality, but one pioneer in the field prefers to call the game “location-based entertainment.”
The game app’s pocket monsters may be taking over the world—but they’re not quite part of it yet, a tech pioneer insists
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GRETA P.'s profile photoKarl Emmanuel Sanchez Laursen's profile photoIsaac Elisaldez's profile photoAri Alleyne's profile photo
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it is impossible to sign up
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The largest single-aperture telescope in the world will search for signs of intelligent alien life.
Dish the size of 30 football field will search for alien life
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Alex west's profile photoVivian Murray's profile photoRivera Jenny's profile photoТенелбай Макытов's profile photo
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+Scientific American
Physicists,you not search so,because all found.Better search so-whether there is a three line time?
https://plus.google.com/+ТенелбайМакытов/posts/MtB5AFBHVFN
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Smartphone manufacturers as well as start-ups have been working to bring modular devices to the market.
Google, LG and others are experimenting with gadgets that come with swappable cameras and sensors and could hit the market next year
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Some Random Guy's profile photoB.L. Alley's profile photoKamini Jain's profile photo
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Bat krva do
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For machines to truly have common sense—to be able to figure out how the world works and make reasonable decisions based on that knowledge—they must be able to teach themselves without human supervision.
The social network is ramping up artificial intelligence to teach machines to figure out what users want—without human help
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Mike DeSimone's profile photoS E West's profile photoKevin Carney's profile photoMarian Outridge's profile photo
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Common sense is not common place...one needs to think before speaking and after all is said and done one's action is left to be seen
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Although some smartphone camera lenses already include this technology, the effect has yet to be achieved in larger lenses.
A new type of lens adjusts its prescription according to where the user looks
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Coach G Moore's profile photoSusan Morgan's profile photoJason Allen's profile photo
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+Susan Morgan Is that because you really want the glasses, or because they're a reminder of your age? If it's the latter, just lie and introduce them as older cousins.
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Researchers are using individual atoms to make big gains in data-storage capacity.
Chlorine atom grids outperform state-of-the-art hard disk drives by orders of magnitude
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A robot carrying an explosive device was used to kill one of the shooters in Thursday night’s horrific violence in Dallas, Texas.
Dallas police using a robot and explosives to kill a suspected shooter is nothing new or sinister, say law enforcement and robotics experts
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Karl Emmanuel Sanchez Laursen's profile photoLarry Lyons's profile photoHolly's Folly - A Garden's profile photoGeo Jack Jack's profile photo
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+Steven London Yep, just a tool...
"Tools" don't act on their own, they are directed and used by others... 
Tools include: objects, people, resources, ...
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A new approach to high-speed photography could help capture the clearest-ever footage of light pulses, explosions or neurons firing in the brain.
The enhanced ultrafast camera is three billion times faster than the one on an iPhone, the researchers say
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A study highlights paradoxes facing carmakers, car buyers and regulators as driverless technology accelerates.
Autonomous vehicles may put people in life-or-death situations. Will the outcomes be decided by ethics or data?
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Theodore A Hoppe's profile photoWylie Atkinson's profile photoYu-Jen Chang's profile photoMichael Vescovo's profile photo
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+Wylie Atkinson that's not really addressing the dilemma. What they're saying is that the dilemma is passed on from a human to a machine. If you have no choice but to kill someone (not including yourself) who will you pick? This is the type of question the machine will need to answer in case the situation arises. I suspect it will try to identify the people and make a decision based on the value it places on each individual.
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LIGO has spotted its second set of spacetime ripples, in this case coming from colliding black holes 14 and eight times the mass of the sun.
The second confirmation of ripples in spacetime is announced by astronomers at LIGO
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Poz I am funny OK cool thanks for letting me know asap... 
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A team in California and Spain has made an experimental prototype of a universal quantum computer that can solve a wide range of problems in fields such as chemistry and physics.
Combining the best of analog and digital approaches could yield a full-scale multipurpose quantum computer
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Ian Agol's profile photoJeffrey Mabry's profile photo  Mohamed Abdelkader's profile photoZeezee Agapotheos's profile photo
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can it solve cancer?
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Scientific American is the authoritative source for the science discoveries and technology innovations that matter.
Introduction

Founded in 1845, the award-winning Scientific American is the authoritative source for science discoveries and technology innovations that matter. For influential opinion leaders who make policy, business leaders, educators, students and science enthusiasts, Scientific American is the essential guide to the modern world. The longest continuously published magazine in the U.S., it is translated into 14 languages, and reaches a global audience of more than 6 million. Other titles include Scientific American Mind and Spektrum der Wissenschaft in Germany.