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People on a stationary bike pedal faster when they simultaneously tackle a mental test [video].
Researchers were surprised to find that cyclists rode faster while taking on easy mental tasks. —Karen Hopkin, Eliene Augenbraun Click here for a transcript of this video.
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I always did better aerobics with music, or while watching TV.  Also, I would read while on the treadmill, sometimes.  Having your mind partially focused elsewhere, does make a difference!  I think music worked best to enhance my workouts.  Well, for me it did, anyway.  I can't workout anymore, due to health related issues and I miss it very much.  :)
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 Two college students discover that starfish have the amazing ability to eject foreign objects through their skin
A funny thing happened when two Danish college students injected tracking tags into starfish. The tracking tags kept mysteriously winding up on the bottom of the tank.
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Awesome
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Somewhere in interstellar space a cat has a chance to preserve quantum coherence, but on Earth, not so much.
Theorists argue that warped spacetime prevents quantum superpositions of large-scale objects
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+Ain't Bea POOR
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Both chimps and humans love cooked food, only chimps never learned to cook for themselves. #science   #primates  
You won’t see them on your favorite cooking show any time soon, but chimps prefer their food cooked and will bring items to be cooked before they eat them — Christopher Intagliata, Eliene Augenbraun, Benjamin Meyers Click here for a transcript of this video.
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So Chitah sez Tarzan cook dinner pleaz?
Suddenly becomes Zira ordering the astronaut to bake a four course meal or she will hand him to Dr Zaius....
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Hint: the source that makes this galaxy so bright swirls in its center.
The light emitted by ;this very distant galaxy ;is the equivalent of 300 trillion suns. – Eliene Augenbraun, Benjamin Meyers, Lee Billings Click here for a transcript of this video.
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Quasar
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This saw-toothed curve is officially in the history books. The 50-year-old Keeling Curve is honored today as a National Historic Chemical Landmark at Scripps Institution of Oceanography in San Diego. #science   #climate  
The Keeling Curve, which records atmospheric carbon dioxide changes since 1958, was just awarded National Historic Chemical Landmark status. — Jen Christiansen, Eliene Augenbraun, Benjamin Meyers Click here for a transcript of this video.
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Fools will be fools. If you had been born much earlier, you'd be a flat earther, just because you had others say so. Unimpressive..
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Hundreds of acres of once-vibrant, postcard-perfect groves that have prospered for centuries are now cemeteries where twisted, dead tree trunks protrude like arboreal zombies from fertile soil in which grass and flowers easily grow.
Officials are torching thousands of olive trees without knowing if fire will stop the spread of a lethal bacterium
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They love climate warming global change to
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This species of ant is also known as the blue cheese ant.
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I know . Terrible aren't I?
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Umm, about that rocket... 
The 34-story tall Saturn V was the first vehicle humans ever used to land on the moon. Tyson's model was sent to him from Huntsville, Alabama.
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Transcripts child picture book if you build it to scale ratio percentages and gravitational boundaries
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The real story behind Nobel laureate Tim Hunt's comments about women in science, from the journalist who broke the story. #science #bias
The British Nobel Prize-winner has complained that he's been treated unfairly, but it is the women he insulted that deserve sympathy and support
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+Debra Cleaver Thank you for your excellent response. 
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Philae phoned home!
The historic space probe has sent signals to Earth, ending seven months of silence
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Vaya despertar del sueño profundo. 
 ·  Translate
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Planning a vacation to a tropical island with white sandy beaches? #science #beach
The beautiful white sand beaches and reefs of tropical areas around the world exist largely thanks to parrot fish droppings. – Benjamin Meyers, ;Julia Rosen, ;Eliene Augenbraun ; Click here for a transcript of this video.
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Some places have white beaches not because of Parrot fish, but because the waves and wind are strong enough to grind up the shells of molluscs. You can usually differentiate the two because parrot fish faecal matter is a much finer grain.
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Scientific American is the authoritative source for the science discoveries and technology innovations that matter.
Introduction

Founded in 1845, the award-winning Scientific American is the authoritative source for science discoveries and technology innovations that matter. For influential opinion leaders who make policy, business leaders, educators, students and science enthusiasts, Scientific American is the essential guide to the modern world. The longest continuously published magazine in the U.S., it is translated into 14 languages, and reaches a global audience of more than 6 million. Other titles include Scientific American Mind and Spektrum der Wissenschaft in Germany.