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Scientific American
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Scientific American is the authoritative source for the science discoveries and technology innovations that matter.
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Founded in 1845, the award-winning Scientific American is the authoritative source for science discoveries and technology innovations that matter. For influential opinion leaders who make policy, business leaders, educators, students and science enthusiasts, Scientific American is the essential guide to the modern world. The longest continuously published magazine in the U.S., it is translated into 14 languages, and reaches a global audience of more than 6 million. Other titles include Scientific American Mind and Spektrum der Wissenschaft in Germany. 

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Think your heart is ready for Valentine's Day?
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It's true. LIGO has discovered ripples in space-time created by merging black holes.
The LIGO experiment has confirmed Albert Einstein’s prediction of ripples in spacetime and promises to open a new era of astrophysics
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What a great breakthrough in the science world
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The rumor is that LIGO may have detected gravitational waves.
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Michael Sullivan's profile photoAsta Muratti's profile photoNahuel Arca's profile photoJames Brown's profile photo
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They had me at the collision of stellar- mass black holes and Kip' s exhortation about cosmic gravitational waves in his 1987 tome. Hopefully LIGO's simultaneous press conferences tomorrow will present revolutionary tidings of the sort he hypothesized.
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Would you rather vote online or at the polls?
Other countries are bringing the democratic process to the digital age—but challenges remain
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+Owen Roberts Blocked.
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Google DeepMind created a sophisticated AI computer program that has beaten a Go champion for the first time in history.
Google's DeepMind program, which has mastered the 2,500-year-old board game, is a big achievement in artificial intelligence
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Dinçer Reçber's profile photoJal CogniScienceS's profile photoCafé Radioativo's profile photoMike Matessa's profile photo
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I think Google has a good platform to develop these kind of programs. It'll be nice to have it run on Android!
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Apple's iOS 9.3 update will incorporate a feature that could help people sleep better.
The company's latest mobile operating system update signals growing awareness of the potential negative health effect of using smartphones and tablets at night
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+Isaac Elisaldez not to mention the 'Do Not Disturb' feature on some Android smartphones with adjustable filters.
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In their circles
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In matters of the heart, size makes a difference.
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I repaired heart monitors in the 1970's. Back then they were a hand wired mass in a plastic case, where the wires had to be moved around to get them to transmit on the correct frequency. They have improved a great deal. 
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Gravity waves have been detected! This video explains what they are.
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We shed skin and bacteria in a mixture as unique as a fingerprint.
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this is not news to anyone that has trained dogs in tracking trials.
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It's "Trilobite Tuesday." Do you know where your trilobites are?
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Forensic investigations can reveal the method and magnitude of a hack attack. Pinpointing the culprit, however, is frustratingly more difficult.
Although the method of a hack attack can be deciphered, the culprits often remain a mystery
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Victor Manuel Pincay Zambrano's profile photoMichael Sullivan's profile photoNahuel Arca's profile photoJoan Salas's profile photo
 
Because you're not enlisting the help of the right people. What you need is real hackers, like from the old days, before the word "hacker" was corrupted by media propaganda. People who live and breathe technology and understand it's inner workings at it's most fundamental levels. They, along with the help of cooperative sysadmins, log files, and data mining techniques can indeed trace the source of at least some attacks and crimes that currently go untraced. You have to give those sort of people a good incentive though. Money isn't always the right thing to offer them, but some of the things money can buy get their attention pretty quick. Tech enough to do the task, recognition for the good they do when they succeed, an "attaboy" once in a while... These are a few of the things that motivate those sorts of folk.
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Why would a biochemist make three-dimensional prints of budding yeast cells? 
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Paolo Pascucci's profile photoBhargavi Bergi's profile photoTonia Hall (Pashta)'s profile photoAnn Little's profile photo
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Wow, that's pretty cool! Actual cell division, right there!
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