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Scientific American
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Scientific American is the authoritative source for the science discoveries and technology innovations that matter.
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Founded in 1845, the award-winning Scientific American is the authoritative source for science discoveries and technology innovations that matter. For influential opinion leaders who make policy, business leaders, educators, students and science enthusiasts, Scientific American is the essential guide to the modern world. The longest continuously published magazine in the U.S., it is translated into 14 languages, and reaches a global audience of more than 6 million. Other titles include Scientific American Mind and Spektrum der Wissenschaft in Germany. 

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Smartphone manufacturers as well as start-ups have been working to bring modular devices to the market.
Google, LG and others are experimenting with gadgets that come with swappable cameras and sensors and could hit the market next year
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Gert Sønderby's profile photoMark Mead's profile photoMike DeSimone's profile photoSome Random Guy's profile photo
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I'd also like to add that this isn't really feasible to do well as a business anyway. Unless we get rid of branded phones all together, and there's a standard introduced for stuff like case sizes, motherboards etc, companies just wont be able to support all hardware for every niche.

Look at the LG G5 flop for example. And that's with only a single modular slot...
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For machines to truly have common sense—to be able to figure out how the world works and make reasonable decisions based on that knowledge—they must be able to teach themselves without human supervision.
The social network is ramping up artificial intelligence to teach machines to figure out what users want—without human help
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Mike DeSimone's profile photoS E West's profile photoKevin Carney's profile photoMarian Outridge's profile photo
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Common sense is not common place...one needs to think before speaking and after all is said and done one's action is left to be seen
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Although some smartphone camera lenses already include this technology, the effect has yet to be achieved in larger lenses.
A new type of lens adjusts its prescription according to where the user looks
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Coach G Moore's profile photoSusan Morgan's profile photoJason Allen's profile photo
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+Susan Morgan Is that because you really want the glasses, or because they're a reminder of your age? If it's the latter, just lie and introduce them as older cousins.
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Computer scientists and engineers have long dreamed of harnessing DNA’s tininess and resilience for storing digital data.
Interest by Microsoft and others in DNA–based storage could deliver post-silicon electronic memory within a decade
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This wearable robot, or exosuit, reduces the amount of energy used while carrying a heavy weight by about 7 percent.
The wearable robot differs from other exoskeletons because it relies on soft materials to reduce the amount of energy used while carrying a heavy weight by about 7 percent, on average, the researchers found
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Jesus M. Candelario's profile photoGhost Hunters NYC-Upper West Side Occult Science's profile photoTyler Baxter's profile photo
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+Ghost Hunters NYC-Upper West Side Occult Science What's it like to hunt for things that you never actually find empirical evidence of?
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The process of identifying potential targets, selecting them and planning “cyberbomb” attacks includes not only technological experts but military strategists, researchers, policy analysts, lawyers and others across the military-industrial complex.
Clusters of software and hardware are being aimed at ISIS and other outlaw groups
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Jesus M. Candelario's profile photoSharingFOCUS's profile photo
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+Jesus M. Candelario
Oh yes, they spread far and wide... and I'm pretty sure that the West won't bat an eye if they spread into the soft belly of China soon ;)

They are being used as proxies, but they of course have agendas of their own, which they hope to further in the shadow of the big powers.
I don't see this ending before those powers have agreed on the exact way in which they will incorporate what they envision as the "New World Order".
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A study highlights paradoxes facing carmakers, car buyers and regulators as driverless technology accelerates.
Autonomous vehicles may put people in life-or-death situations. Will the outcomes be decided by ethics or data?
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Theodore A Hoppe's profile photoWylie Atkinson's profile photoYu-Jen Chang's profile photoMichael Vescovo's profile photo
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+Wylie Atkinson that's not really addressing the dilemma. What they're saying is that the dilemma is passed on from a human to a machine. If you have no choice but to kill someone (not including yourself) who will you pick? This is the type of question the machine will need to answer in case the situation arises. I suspect it will try to identify the people and make a decision based on the value it places on each individual.
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LIGO has spotted its second set of spacetime ripples, in this case coming from colliding black holes 14 and eight times the mass of the sun.
The second confirmation of ripples in spacetime is announced by astronomers at LIGO
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Millie Baxter's profile photoGabrielito Perez's profile photoSamuel Ochieng's profile photo
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Poz I am funny OK cool thanks for letting me know asap... 
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A team in California and Spain has made an experimental prototype of a universal quantum computer that can solve a wide range of problems in fields such as chemistry and physics.
Combining the best of analog and digital approaches could yield a full-scale multipurpose quantum computer
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Ian Agol's profile photoJeffrey Mabry's profile photo  Mohamed Abdelkader's profile photoZeezee Agapotheos's profile photo
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can it solve cancer?
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Cell phone maker Kyocera says it expects to bring its solar-powered smartphone to market soon.
Gadget makers experiment with translucent solar cells that let touch screens draw energy from the sun
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Spud Kaputnik's profile photoSamuel Leuenberger's profile photoHolly's Folly - A Garden's profile photoKatrina Cureton's profile photo
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That's interesting.
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Hyperloop One wants to transport commuters through a tube at close to the speed of sound, but can humans handle it?
How to make G-forces from a 1,000-kph tube ride “vomit-free”
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Tom Nathe's profile photoBrian Sidi's profile photo
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+Astrogirl1usa you never said anything the first time. 
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Although the Tesla Model 3 doesn’t produce any emissions itself, the power plant that generates the electricity used to charge its batteries probably does.
Your battery-powered vehicle is only as green as your electricity supplier
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Spud Kaputnik's profile photoJan Galkowski's profile photoJason Werner's profile photoRoss Schiff's profile photo
32 comments
 
+Jason Werner Agreed. Actually once any of these possibilities gets some traction to take some of the pressure off, we'll probably get more sensible about the whole thing. One day we'll look back at the incredible bounty of organic hydrocarbons in the ground accumulated over millennia and feel disbelief that we merely burned the stuff instead of using organic chemistry to the max to produce foodstocks and products beyond our current imagination.
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