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Scientific American is the authoritative source for the science discoveries and technology innovations that matter.
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Founded in 1845, the award-winning Scientific American is the authoritative source for science discoveries and technology innovations that matter. For influential opinion leaders who make policy, business leaders, educators, students and science enthusiasts, Scientific American is the essential guide to the modern world. The longest continuously published magazine in the U.S., it is translated into 14 languages, and reaches a global audience of more than 6 million. Other titles include Scientific American Mind and Spektrum der Wissenschaft in Germany. 

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Polchinski, author of Scientific American's April cover story, talks about his theory on black holes with space and physics editor Clara Moskowitz.
This Hangout On Air is hosted by Scientific American. The live video broadcast will begin soon.
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Black Hole Firewalls With Physicist Joseph Polchinski
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Андрей Рогачёв's profile photoDan Mack's profile photoSamantha Pearl's profile photoRustin Underwood's profile photo
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+Hoober Doober
Yeah, and you know who OWNS that $18 trillion?  Who do we OWE all that money to? Over 70% of it goes to AMERICANS - pensioners, state governments, investors, savings bonds - REALLY EVIL STUFF!  28% goes to fureigners!!! The horror... http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/1/17/Estimated_ownership_of_treasury_securities_by_year.gif
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Here's what to expect this year from technology.
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Let the script kiddies begin.
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Creativity is sexy, but what are the most and least attractive forms of creativity? Here's an alluring list…
It's no secret: creativity is sexy. People all over the world rank creativity as a highly desirable quality in a partner, and people who are creative ...
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But maybe what most people consider creative draws in other people, like music, while only a precious few will appreciate an improvement to, say, a sewage system. Which is why popularizing science is so important, so for instance more people might find space "sexy" as better and better pictures are more widely distributed making it accessible to them. Did researchers consider inclusiveness versus exclusiveness of the activity I wonder?
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The only real time is now, ....this moment, the past never comes back, the future we can never tell..can never smell.. can never touch. 
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Let's Terminator I ...
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President Obama and Chinese President Xi Jinping have struck a historic climate change agreement in Beijing.
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Let's also Al Gore ...
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Is messaging becoming the new e-mail?
With new rapid-fire ways to communicate, e-mails are on the decline. But they might not be headed for extinction
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Nooo
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Remembering 2014: The top 5 chemistry stories of the year. 
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From Ebola to the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge... What were the top Google searches of 2014?
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+DrZakir Ali Rajnish He he, the link to a hindi site here is doubly hilarious. ROFL. One can of course just google S N BOSE, read he wiki page.
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Does scientific research deserve a tax break? If so, the government isn't making it easy.
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+Dan Gray The finest points are found after all the points have been considered.
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Extreme weather in arctic communities proves dangerous to people as well as animals. 
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Legendary partner of Saint Nicolaus ...
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We perceive space and time to be continuous, but if the amazing theory of loop quantum gravity is correct, they actually come in discrete pieces.
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How this makes a lot of sense is being able to view this as simple stacked beach balls. The eltrical fields found in atoms are near to a neutral balance. Even when ones tries to argue that the negative charge of the electrons would be enough to separate them. That is getting into chemistry. As individual atoms you would have to suspend the thought of these atoms moving and picture them as a solid non moving object. Or like a camera shot of one frame, where anything in the picture is not moving although it is caught in movement. I know confusing but really it is really that simple. The people who make a living off this stuff have to do all the math work to calculate it all and present there findings. This is as simple as it can get, and awesome at the same time.
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