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SpaceX announced that it plans to send its robotic Dragon capsule to Mars as early as 2018. 
The company is said to be demonstrating technology to land large payloads
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Spud Kaputnik's profile photoSlender Halo's profile photoTimothy Gugerty's profile photo
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it looks like a photo of capital punishment option
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A new $1.13 billion project aims to boost a raft of quantum technologies. 
Third European Union flagship will be similar in size and ambition to graphene and human brain initiatives
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The sense of urgency to find clear answers to self-driving vehicle questions is growing. 
Eventually, and inevitably, the carmakers will have to take the blame
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Theodore A Hoppe's profile photoKarl Emmanuel Sanchez Laursen's profile photoDaniel Swiger's profile photoPénsil pero contrito.'s profile photo
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Assurance companies will first raise their prices and later refuse to cover manual drivers. Public opinion tends to be influenced easily by numbers; authorities will progressively ban manual driving, it's a matter of time.
You can't ride bikes or horses automatically, but it's very feasible a future obligation to ride with a beacon or some similar positioning system. Again, matter of time.
I'm not buying safety if to be paid with personal freedom, but that's my opinion. 
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How and why are cats and screaming goats acceptable as sharable content?
Why have cats taken over the Internet?
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Terry Miller's profile photoRunivis Roan's profile photoConrad Carvalho's profile photosporadic -Z's profile photo
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did you ever wonder why Ripley's paperbacks were often so dog eared and ragtag?
+Terry Miller what is a 'life' anyway?
does someone reading this not have one?
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The idea that the universe is a simulation sounds more like the plot of “The Matrix,” but it is also a legitimate scientific hypothesis.
High-profile physicists and philosophers gathered to debate whether we are real or virtual—and what it means either way
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W Blair's profile photoJoel Reid's profile photoAngie Summers's profile photoRoss Elliott's profile photo
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Maybe dejavu is connected to the fact that people have false memories. " I FEEL LIKE I'VE BEEN HERE BEFORE ". may just be something a person has been through in this only lifetime , but , their mind doesn't remember it as the way it actually was , the memory was just an insignificant recording tucked away in the brain somewhere and their mind just twisted it into something the person actually believes they were involved in before. Maybe that feeling of dejavu is just one frame of a recording of the brain , something not worth remembering so the brain breaks it down into one frame and thats all there is to recall , one frame. Maybe , Its only called dejavu because the connection can't be made to the actual event because its not a real memory. How many times in a person's life have they been to a place they were at many times , and later on in life they go back and they say , " this isn't how I remember this at all."
I don't believe that people are going to keep coming back until they get it right. I dont believe the universe keeps recycling itself to the point that we are going to be writing these thoughts again trillions of years in the future. I think people want to believe that they will never really be gone. A lot of people believe that we keep coming back until we get it right. There are billions of different beliefs on the subject. Who's right? If we do come back who's going to know? And why? What do we have to get it right for?
I like reading everyones thoughts, some outrageous, some insightful and some make more sense than what goes through my head and changes the direction and beliefs of my own thoughts.

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Here's a sampling of the mini missions NASA will launch.
In 2018 the Space Launch System will carry 13 shoebox-size CubeSats into deep space
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UNICEF is testing drones in Malawi to see if they can reduce waiting times for HIV test results in rural areas. 
Malawi has started a test program that uses drones to improve access to HIV testing for babies, since factors including poor roads and high transportation costs can result in delays in testing that prevent access to treatment. Sharon Reich reports.
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+Jesus M. Candelario Yeah, if Amazon can deliver that package of tooth whitening gel to entitled consumers, then use the drones for more than test results - let them really help. 
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A 60 Minutes segment this week outlined several ways hackers can hijack phones from anywhere in the world. That hacking method exploited an unsecured, decades-old telecom protocol called Signaling System 7.
The lack of security built into phone networks leaves callers vulnerable to snooping, but the growth of encrypted communications will help protect privacy
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What do you think of Facebook’s new plan to unleash its version of “chatbots” on its extremely popular Messenger service? 
The social media giant is introducing chatbots to help advertisers reach Messenger’s 900 million users
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L Sli's profile photoSpud Kaputnik's profile photoRobby Bred's profile photoPat Le Cat's profile photo
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Facebook copies the popular chatbots from other chat services like Slack. Nothing ground-shaking here.
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The technology for mental health apps is moving a lot faster than the science.
Smartphone apps claim to help conditions from addiction to schizophrenia, but few have been thoroughly tested
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Always happens when there is big money to be made ;)
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A cyber security firm has uncovered a flaw that could allow hackers to attack and take over computers using a wireless mouse connection. 
A cyber security firm has uncovered a flaw that could allow hackers to attack and take over computers using a wireless mouse connection. Ben Gruber reports.
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Bad design wastes our time. Here are the worst digital user-interface debacles.
Why your intelligence has nothing to do with using technology
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Olivier Malinur's profile photoMagnus Lewan's profile photoHolly's Folly - A Garden's profile photo
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+Magnus Lewan True, but you flung it like an accusation.  SA is as SA has always been. 
You can't fault a leopard for having spots.  It is a leopard... 
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Scientific American is the authoritative source for the science discoveries and technology innovations that matter.
Introduction

Founded in 1845, the award-winning Scientific American is the authoritative source for science discoveries and technology innovations that matter. For influential opinion leaders who make policy, business leaders, educators, students and science enthusiasts, Scientific American is the essential guide to the modern world. The longest continuously published magazine in the U.S., it is translated into 14 languages, and reaches a global audience of more than 6 million. Other titles include Scientific American Mind and Spektrum der Wissenschaft in Germany.