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sankarshan mukhopadhyay
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sankarshan mukhopadhyay

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There are times when Freshmenu.com reminds me of another startup - Flipkart.com Both of them made plays to get market share and hopefully customer loyalty. During the early days this was amply demonstrated by exemplary service, a focus on listening to and addressing customer issues, trying out new things etc But over a period of time, the issue of "scaling up" catches up with all. My peeves with Flipkart.com are fairly well documented everywhere and now I don't place any order from them at all. Freshmenu.com is displaying similar patterns as well - infrequent delays in delivery of orders, plastic cutlery that is brittle and has deteriorated in quality (they should really include a choking hazard warning), quality of meals seeing a progressive decline. The most telling piece is something different. In the early days, providing feedback to Flipkart would ensure that you receive a discount voucher or, similar. The other day I took a bit of time to write in reasonable detail to the Freshmenu.com team about things which can improve. The end result - a discount voucher. This entire throw-away tokenism is ugly. A sort of "oh! you took time to write, here's a bone for you!".
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This was on a browser tab for a couple of days now. Stole some time to watch the talk/presentation. Very well put together one.
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If you've been with an organization for a significant duration, the perspective and understanding is often sharply different than what outsiders have. I've been at #RedHat  for the greater part of 11 years and as is usually expected, faced the "How is it to work at Red Hat?" question a number of times.

The question is simple and perhaps the audience demands a pithy response. The truth is that such an answer is pretty much impossible to craft. How do you begin to explain a company that has as its mission statement the line "To be the catalyst in communities of customers, contributors, and partners creating better technology the open source way." (cf. https://redhat.sc.hodesdigital.com/life-at-red-hat/our-culture/) ?

When I joined, it was truly a "small" company (cf. https://www.redhat.com/cms/public/red_hat_history.png). A year or so before that date almost the entire company assembled for a form of "all hands". And that's pretty much the only/last time it happened. I joined a Red Hat that allowed a somewhat rank newcomer to absorb and assimilate information at a rate that was (at least for me) truly drinking from a firehose. The mailing lists had epic conversations around technology (one would either have Subhendu asking about a tricky implementation or, providing a concise response to a somewhat hand-wavy set of queries) and general things (memo list email threads from Rik, Arjan, Mike Harris, Alan Cox and Tiemann were a given). It was the Red Hat where the then CEO went up on stage (was it Linuxworld?) to talk about patents/IP and cite "Britney and her clones" in his spiel. It was also the company where the intranet had a page from James Morris that had the most click-bait-y title one could ever think of.

And locally, the then-JV which I joined was taking large inroads into the business landscape of the country. A decade later, sitting back and thinking about the "good old days", it is incredibly satisfying to see how things have changed. The "enterprise Linux" company which always punched above its weight now has a footprint that puts it right out there with infrastructure plays across nearly all aspects of a modern enterprise IT set up.

Anyway, the point is, that to an extent, the "What is Red Hat and how is it" side of the question was often answered through innovations in technology, spectacular work in upstream communities and good solid hard work. In some form, the absence of a canon, so to speak, enabled a lot of commentators to write about the company and shape the narrative. While reading through Jim Whitehurst's book (cf. http://www.amazon.com/Open-Organization-Igniting-Passion-Performance/dp/1625275277) I realized that this would perhaps be the first step in developing the narrative from the perspective of an insider. And including the points of view of individuals I've seen, known or, met within the company. And that's why it is a great read.

Any narrative about Red Hat tends to work around the theme of "enterprise open source company" with typical emphasis on the "open source" parts of how things might work. While this is largely true, the very notion that an agile organization structure can be created drawing upon the fundamental principles is something this book provides a number of citations about. It is not easy work and the surprises which Jim tripped into are well narrated. The part I did like is eschewing the "Red Hat is special" construct of an argument. Instead, it draws upon numerous experiments (successful and failures), conversations, incidents to demonstrate that there are a set of basic guidelines which emerge. A template which can be consciously or, deliberately adopted.

The principle that leadership can and will emerge often from the unlikeliest instances and individuals can come together to make a difference is a powerful one. That arc is a strong complement to the values of the company as well as the singular aspect of an open source community - collaboration. The book does well to curate and collate such instances which the (non-RHT) readers can relate well to. But, for the associates (and alumni) there are daily reminders of such events and the fact that this is "just how we get things done". 

The book weaves in the values (Freedom, Courage, Commitment, Accountability) as a practice and provides the scaffolding to the various decisions which have been made by Jim and his leadership team. However, the part I like most is that it provides a basis to create a well thought answer to the "How is it like to work there?" question. And with the material being generally available, the top tier talent seeking to join the company will have a well defined perspective to their choice. That's a fantastic thing!
Red Hat is a fast-changing company where people drive constant improvements. Even as a major player in enterprise IT, we've retained our freedom-minded culture and open source values. We connect a global community of enterprises, partners, and developers, co-creating technologies that are more ...
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Interested in #Telegram ? There is a variety of clients for Fedora.
How the instant messaging service Telegram can be used in Fedora.
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Often one gets exceptional cab drivers. Today was one such. A lot of talk about how young people in companies in and around Koramangala seem to be the nicest rides.
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In the Global South especially, people who get scholarships actively or unconsciously suppress the development of their local Wikimedia community so that they retain a leadership role and remain the most eligible people to receive scholarships, grants, attention from Wikimedia community leaders, and other privileges.
[Wikimania-l] Fwd: Wikimania Scholarship. Lane Rasberry lane at bluerasberry.com. Fri Jul 31 12:16:48 UTC 2015. Previous message: [Wikimania-l] Fwd: Wikimania Scholarship; Next message: [Wikimania-l] Fwd: Wikimania Scholarship; Messages sorted by: [ date ] [ thread ] [ subject ] [ author ] ...
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You may think that something is "just your opinion", but often you're just wrong.
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The happy anecdote from a product release - https://rhn.redhat.com/errata/RHBA-2015-1465.html 

"This update fixes the following bug: A race condition in the malloc API family of functions could cause a deadlock leading to gluster NFS and Fuse mounts becoming unresponsive while running large amounts of I/O. The race condition in malloc has been removed and gluster NFS and Fuse mounts no longer hang in the described situation."

A number of fine folks came together to make this happen :)
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A recent and perhaps on-going discussion on BangPypers list makes me ask whether, as part of the "programming community" exercise we are taking obvious, explicit and deliberate steps to not actually think what makes this community. For more context do read http://python.6.x6.nabble.com/Connecting-developers-and-companies-td5167085.html 

As with everything, it begins with a somewhat simple and well articulated suggestion "There was a suggestion of having 10 minutes slot at the end of the meetup where companies can speak about them and openings for 2 minutes. "

I've responded on the list and to get a fair assessment of where I stand, take a look at the first few minutes of this video - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2AX6g0tK-us

Python is as much a programming language community as it is an applied engineering community. The nuances of the design and development of the programming language, choices made through discussions and debates are also tested/applied into day to day product/project level implementations. It is not beyond the realms of plausibility to assume that actual businesses invest a good amount of revenue back into (research and) development so as to continue to raise the bar on things. With that in mind, the community of such passionate users and developers would not only include individual developers (who may/may not choose to highlight their employer affiliation) but it also includes the companies and the organizations themselves. If there is a disagreement, then the fundamental act of seeking corporate sponsorship for a flagship event like PyCon India should be stopped immediately.

A community draws strength from the fact that there is a substantial segment of business interest which makes it worthwhile to take risks and investigate new ventures (in engineering and business). Conflating this idea with the conjecture that "meetups will turn into job fairs" or, worse "Company A will have a direct competitor Company B making recruitment pitches" is just arbitrary regulation.

Let's consider both the scenarios. If a meetup does over a period of time degenerate into a job fair, it would be relatively easy for the members of the community to come together to propose other methods of recruitment or, even a complete stop to such activity. And if business ventures which compete do indeed make recruitment pitches, how does it harm the community organizing the meetup? Isn't it more of a personnel management topic that both companies would require to work through? Do we seriously think that such "coincidences" do not happen at the randomly high number of tech-events which happen through the country?

Ill constructed responses based purely on "this cannot happen because we do not like it" are somewhat unasked for. If there are genuine reasons which impinge upon areas where PSSI or, BangPypers have oversight, they should be the driving factor of the decision. Not the "let's talk, but we don't want it" way of driving things. Among other things http://python.6.x6.nabble.com/Connecting-developers-and-companies-tp5167085p5167263.html provides a much more pragmatic approach to this topic.

An oft-misunderstood reason around the LUGs becoming defunct is that a good number of them treated the businesses around Linux with clear and complete disdain. The distaste was evident in creative usage of regulations to keep them away. The net result is that the hackerspaces have moved away from the LUGs. It is somewhat sad to see Python User Groups adopt a similar rigid stance without putting much thought to the gains from this approach. Every single approach has gains and drawbacks. Conjuring up hypothetical downsides to prevent something has a pejorative. I think we know what it is called.
Connecting developers and companies. Hi We have come long way with BangPypers meetup [1]. In last two years, we conducted regular workshops and talks. We have seen people travelling from different...
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"Clever questions can seal away your ignorance as securely as specialist training.   If you ask questions to prove how well you understand the other person, you're thinking about that proof… and not about what she is saying.   Stay in touch with your ignorance, do not hide it.   Ask about what you truly do not understand, however dumb you fear the question sounds.   Honesty brings faster understanding, and greater respect.   You cannot fool a subject specialist that you understand, when you don't.   The specialist can clear up puzzlements for you if, and only if, you ask.   (A good one can hear in your questions what you need to know, and build an answer to fit what honest questions have revealed about your understanding.   Mediocre experts, insecure, will make answers hard, to prove their own cleverness in grasping this hard stuff.  Avoid such people, and hope they soon move from research to a job where they can be useful.) " http://geometeer.com/geometeerignorance.html
Context: I wrote this article in the mid-1990s, while Chief Scientist at the Centre for Information-Enhanced Medicine at the National University of Singapore (NUS), for the annual student journal of the Pharmacology Department — hence the pharm-specific intro. Someone asked me to make it more ...
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also, watch https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c9YVIQ0995A if you have around 60 mins.
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"When you work for the "Defining Open Source Software Company of the 21st Century", you get a different sense of gravity for the work you do. " from +Jared Morgan (cf. https://jaredmorgs.github.io/2015/07/17/Sometimes-You-Need-To-Pay-It-Forward.html) Amen!
When you work for the "Defining Open Source Software Company of the 21st Century", you get a different sense of gravity for the work you do. Regardless of the work you do, your contributions have a impact on the wider...
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i hope for a time when neither magic and nor sufficiently advanced technology will be unavailable to a large section of the society

i post on G+ and am available at sankarshan at pobox dot com. www.linkedin.com/in/sankarshan is my LinkedIn profile.

To catch me on IRC, try Freenode and, look for sankarshan or, _sankarshan
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