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paul beard
1,909 followers -
Lifelong learner and teacher
Lifelong learner and teacher

1,909 followers
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What if one of the big takeaways from Amazon's HQ2 gambit is how much cities will give away in exchange for jobs that likely won't go to locals and a corporate footprint that will permanently alter their city?

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Sounds on par with my Amazon customer service experience but I have never gotten 65 lb of weed and a $150 gift card as compensation.

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“One aspect of the (Vietnam) conflict by the way that I will never ever countenance is that we drafted the lowest income level of America and the highest income level found a doctor that would say that they had a bone spur. That is wrong. That is wrong. If we are going to ask every American to serve, every American should serve.” — Sen John McCain.

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Here's @LeaveEUOfficial admitting it ran a botnet (h/t@peterjukes). And it's a whole new can of worms..
Dear @andywigmore some qs for you...

The thread is interesting…seems like Russia has been very busy indeed.

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The gist is that Apple is trying to drastically curtail the use of “third-party cookies.” That’s cookies that aren’t from sites you visit everyday but third parties that are sort of along for the ride and there pretty much only to track you.

The big way Apple will determine what we’ll call “good” and “bad” cookies is through a mix of machine learning to learn how “tracky” the cookies are and how often you visit the site that ‘owns’ the cookie.

I remember when we put this in place at CNN.com. On each page, we served a little 1x1 pixel image with a cookie (the cookie is a token that gets stored in the browser prefs and can only be written to/read by the site that owns/issues it). Now when you go to CNN.com or cnncookies.com you can be tagged as the same user. Then when you go CartoonNetwork.com or any other CNN/TBS property, you get a cnncookies.com cookie the same way: an innocuous 1x1 pixel gif with a request to store a cookie or read from/write to an existing one. Now CNN/TBS knows you as a CNN.com and CartoonNetwork.com reader. Extrapolate that other sites within TBS or at partner sites and you see how someone can show you related content, no matter where you go. If Google/Facebook store their own "third-party" cookie, they can create a profile of all the places you visit over time. Apple's 24 hour timeout seems like a reasonable idea. If you don't go to a site once a day, they have to forget about you between visits.

[T]he consensus within the ad tech industry press seems to be that this will actually strengthen the monopolistic hold which Google and Facebook have over the ad industry and the web itself.
[…]
I was talking to someone who’s spent years in the digital ad industry who sees it a little differently. This person saw the whole move as actually aimed at Google.
[…]
My friend’s theory is that Apple wants to start creating turbulence within Google’s business model, even if it’s at first only at the margins. Remember, Google now competes with Apple in the hardware market. And critically, advertising is a space Apple has never seemed interested in playing in. Virtually every Apple business is focused on payments and subscriptions – pricey hardware, iTunes music and video which is anchored in Apple TV, Apple Music, etc. If the digital ad industry explodes, it’s not much skin off Apple’s back. In any case, Apple’s never been big on the open web in any case.[?] They want you in curated, controlled spaces – either in the much more tightly circumscribed OSX environment or iOS apps.

Yes, Apple prefers a subscription model, rather than a "give away the content while you give away your information so we can sell it" model. I have a hard time seeing that as a bad thing. Likewise, curation: I don't think there have been many apps on iOS found to sending people's entire contact lists to sites in China or Russia: curation and app review are not Stalinist control.

The idea that "Apple’s never been big on the open web" seems odd: they ship a web browser, not an AOL-esque "experience." They did that in the 90s wuth eWorld and gave up on it long before AOL did. The breakthrough product that Steve Jobs rolled out to save his company was the…iMac. It came with a modem, Ethernet and wireless but notably, not a subscription to any Apple walled garden.

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TIL that…

Astronauts living aboard the International Space Station actually live closer to the graveyard of spacecraft than anyone else. This is because the ISS orbits about 250 miles above Earth — and Point Nemo, when the orbital laboratory flies overhead. (The nearest island, meanwhile, is much farther away.)

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Not the first time I have heard this argument…
“Happy Holidays” is exactly an expression of Judaeo-Christian values, coined to embrace the Jewish Hanukkah as well as Christmas. In this context, King’s suggestion that “Happy Holidays” is secular misses the point. The majority of secular Americans celebrate Christmas (happily mixing Santa Claus, carols, and consumerism). They say “Happy Holidays” as a nod to religious diversity among believers, not because they feel excluded from Christmas.

Insistence on “Merry Christmas”, by contrast, is a repudiation of the claim implicit in “Judaeo-Christian”, namely, that Jews and Christians have essentially the same beliefs and worship the same god, and that the differences between the two are ultimately less important than the commonalities. On any interpretation of Christianity in which all who reject Christ (including, I imagine, most of us here at CT) are damned, “Judaeo-Christian” is a much more pernicious version of political correctness than “Happy Holidays”.

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If you were an energy company, you would have been working on this since before 1938, whence this clip dates. But if you were a resource extraction/tax and finance strategy company, well, this would be of no interest at all.

As timely as ever —

“The worst illiterate is the political illiterate, he doesn’t hear, doesn’t speak, nor participates in the political events. He doesn’t know the cost of life, the price of the bean, of the fish, of the flour, of the rent, of the shoes and of the medicine, all depends on political decisions. The political illiterate is so stupid that he is proud and swells his chest saying that he hates politics. The imbecile doesn’t know that, from his political ignorance is born the prostitute, the abandoned child, and the worst thieves of all, the bad politician, corrupted and flunky of the national and multinational companies.” — Bertolt Brecht

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