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patrick tinkham
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patrick tinkham

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"There’s also a very, very subtle effect: neutrinos, which only make up a few percent of the energy density at these early times, can subtly shift the phases of these peaks and troughs. This phase shift — if detectable — would provide not only strong evidence of the existence of the cosmic neutrino background, but would allow us to measure its temperature, putting the Big Bang to the test in a brand new way."

A new technique taking advantage of data from the Planck satellite has just detected the cosmic neutrino background definitively and in a new way, with the subsequent polarization spectra — set to be released by the Planck team — ready to confirm the greatest prediction of all: the cosmic neutrino background’s temperature!
A leftover glow unlike any other — of neutrinos — has finally been seen.
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After graduating WVU, she went on to receive her master’s in aeronautics and astronautics from MIT. She then worked as a research assistant at NASA research centers and did internships at the U.S. House of Representatives and other space-related companies.
Earlier this month, an internet firestorm was set off after Isis Wenger, a 22-year-old San Francisco-based engineer, was criticized online … Continue reading →
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New at The Physics Classroom:

We have just uploaded our newest simulation to The Physics Interactives section of our website. Titled Electrostatics Landscape, the simulation allows a user to explore the electric potential "landscape" surrounding a configuration of charges. Numerical values of potential, color, and electric field vectors are used to allow the user to explore the equipotential lines about two charges. 

Like all our Interactives, they are written in HTML5 and are compatible with tablets such as the iPad, Chromebooks, and smart phones. They are the perfect tool for the 1:1 classroom. Enjoy the Electrostatics Landscapes Interactive at 

http://www.physicsclassroom.com/Physics-Interactives/Static-Electricity/Electrostatics-Landscapes
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For the seventh consecutive year, PNNL achieved the highest – or tied for the highest – overall performance grades among U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science national laboratories.  Read about PNNL’s performance evaluation in the Tri-City Herald: http://bit.ly/1weAgRA
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Until recently, little has been known about what structural features on Ebola that the antibodies bind to or how that binding occurs. The genetic material of the Ebola virus is protected by a filamentous coating of glycoproteins (GP), which are proteins chemically linked to complex sugars. GP mediates recognition of a host cell, enabling viral entry and subsequent infection. Recently, researchers have investigated how each monoclonal antibody (neutralizing and nonneutralizing) within ZMapp latches on to Ebola. These studies reveal sites of vulnerability on the virus.
We know what antibodies stop it in its tracks—we know know where they attach.
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We're getting closer!
 
The flight controllers who will launch and operate #Orion during its Dec. 4 flight test are conducting a mission dress rehearsal today to make sure they have the plans for the 4 1/2-hour flight down solid and to refine any areas. Details: http://go.nasa.gov/1yTjBBL  
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patrick tinkham

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"How is Hawking’s theory of black holes storing information on the shell of an event horizon different than what Susskind said decades ago about black holes storing information on the shell of an event horizon? Did Hawking just pull a Steve Jobs and proclaim something new that Android figured out years before? Or is this actually new stuff?"

Stephen Hawking is claiming that the black hole information paradox has now been resolved, with the information encoded on the event horizon and then onto the outgoing radiation via a new mechanism that he’ll detail in a paper due out next month, along with collaborators Malcom Perry and Andrew Strominger. Only, that’s not really what’s happening here. While he does have a new idea and there is a paper coming out, its contents do not solve the information paradox, but merely provide a hypothesis as to how it may be solved in the future.
Or is this an example of the media hype surrounding Hawking going nuts?
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Answer to the question posted by Matematyka
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One of the last bastions of human mastery over computers is about to fall to the relentless onslaught of machine learning algorithms.
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"[The] Big Bang… says that as space-time is expanding, this is causing the light shift towards longer wavelengths. Does space-time expansion affect matter particles in any way? After all, matter particles have a finite size."

If the Universe is expanding and cooling, it’s easy to visualize how radiation cools: it has a wavelength, space expands, and so as the wavelength gets stretched, the energy drops. But what about the matter? Energies must have dropped for matter as well, otherwise it wouldn’t have lost enough kinetic energy to become gravitationally bound into gas clumps, stars and galaxies. And yet, those things very much exist! What’s the resolution to this? The incredible answer is here.
Radiation gets stretched to longer and longer wavelengths as space itself expands, but what happens to matter?
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"[I]t can often feel as though we’re zoning in on the last few big questions of how our Universe has evolved. Instead we are standing at a precipice, looking down into a gulley of new frontiers in Cosmology that we’ve only begun to explore, waiting for our eyes to adjust."

Accelerated by some unknown mechanism, the highest energy particles in the entire Universe come from all over the sky with energies exceeding 10^19 eV, or more than a million times the energies achieved at the LHC. On the flipside, the lowest energy radio waves are emitted by an ultra-rare transition of hydrogen atoms, and may provide a window into the Universe from before the first stars formed. Come learn about the highest and lowest energy signals from the Universe, and why they matter for our understanding of it all.
How new developments in measuring the highest-energy particles and earliest signals from the Universe are teaching us wh…
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