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patrick tinkham
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Is it naive to think that we're the first intelligent (and tech-building) species the universe has ever known? http://buff.ly/23O6kZo
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this funny advertisement from #Prague Old Town has become popular.
It is shot in front of the Rudolfinum Hall, which is home of the Czech Philharmonic Orchestra and classical music festivals take place here as well as art gallery exhibitions.
Rudolfinum Hall is quite near to our #hotel and so if you plan to come for Prague Spring music festival, our #accommodation is very convenient.
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“Viewed 11 hours (1 Saturn-day) apart, we determined the hurricane migrates across Saturn at 100 kph (60 mph). These storms have occurred every 20-30 years since first seen in 1876, as hot air rises, cools and falls. 2011’s was the largest of all, large enough to contain ten-to-twelve Earths, but may be surpassed next time.”

On Earth, category 5 hurricanes cause devastation wherever they make landfall, bringing sustained winds, rain, destruction and – in many cases – casualties. But despite how strong and massive these storms can be, they’re just peanuts compared to what happens on our Solar System’s gas giants. While Saturn’s north pole and Jupiter’s great red spot are powerful, sustained storms that are far larger than anything found on our world, a world-encircling storm on Saturn that raged for over 200 days from 2010-2011 broke all the records. At its grandest, it was large enough to contain 10-to-12 Earths.

Go get the full story – and learn when that record might be broken – on today’s Mostly Mute Monday!
In 2011, a Saturnian storm put everything else to shame. But that record might not stand for long.
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She has a demonstrated interest in science and, at 16, was the youngest researcher in a Columbia University lab, working among PhD and master's students in summer 2015.
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Weasel Apparently Shuts Down World’s Most Powerful Particle Collider
The Large Hadron Collider in Switzerland is offline, following a run-in with a small mammal that munched on a power cord.
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"The stars of the past had to die so that you could be here, and someday, a long time from now, our Sun will return the favor, and help make more new stars, new planets, new worlds, and new chances for life. So yes, it’s true that the Sun will explode someday. But when it does, that’s the greatest gift any star can ever hope to give to the Universe. It would be too greedy to keep that all for ourselves. After all, it took billions of stars giving that gift already in order to make you."

The cosmic story common to all of us -- where we came from, how we got here and where we're headed into the future -- is both amazing and daunting. But when we're first exposed to the vastness of it all in terms of both time and space, it can be downright terrifying. This is particularly true for young children, who often experience a huge existential crisis when they realize that not only are they going to die, but everyone and everything that ever existed will die, including the Sun. How can we simultaneously give them the scientifically accurate (and level-appropriate) story of the Universe while still being kind and compassionate?

Here's my attempt, which I encourage you to share with every curious child you know!
The limited nature of not just ourselves, but of the Earth and the Sun, is something we all must come to terms with. Here's how to comfort a child without losing scientific accuracy.
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Think of glass, and you’ll probably visualize the water container on your dinner table or the barriers that keep the cold and wind outside your home. From reading glasses to electronics, we rely on glass for a wide variety of applications. Its unique properties of stability keep diverse materials from crystallizing – a state in which molecules don't move and are all in structured arrays. No matter how glass is made, understanding its properties is important – whether you want to, for example, keep food fresh or extend the shelf life of medicine. Read more about a key discovery that brings more understanding of the fundamental properties of glass: http://goo.gl/fnlblg
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From the Fun Fact files, here is a Fun Fact at the Easy level: Math Limerick. Question: Why is this a mathematical limerick? ( (12 + 144 + 20 + 3 Sqrt[4]) / 7 ) + 5*11 = 92 + 0 . Answer: A dozen, a gross, and a score, plus three times the square root of four, divided by seven, ...
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Happy Wednesday Wisdom g+ fam! The irony of life :)

Love, your favorite behavioral scientist and relationship blogger, http://yourejustadumbass.com/


#wellnesswednesday   #wednesdaywisdom   #wonderfulwednesday   #humpday   #relationships   #love   #life   #lifelessons   #truth   #realtalk  
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"Today, our understanding of the expanding Universe depends extraordinarily precisely on measuring cosmic distances. Yet the closest rungs on that cosmic distance ladder, for star like Cepheid variables within our own galaxy, are dependent on this parallax method. If there’s an error of just a few percent on those measurements, then those errors will propagate all the way to the greatest distances, and this is one potential resolution to the tensions in the measurements of the Hubble constant. We’ve come a long way in measuring cosmic distances to an incredible precision, but we’re not 100% certain that our best methods are as accurate as we need them to be. Perhaps, after four centuries of trying to measure how far away the nearest stars truly are, we still have farther to go."

Glittering above high overhead, the canopy of night offers thousands of points of light, each one a blazing Sun, starring in the story of its own Solar System. But even armed with that knowledge, it’s difficult to calculate exactly how far away such a star would actually be. The brightness/distance relationship is a great start, but stars intrinsically come in different brightnesses, making that method unreliable. Measuring stellar parallax is a phenomenal achievement, where only the geometry of the Earth’s orbit around the Sun and the proximity of the nearby star relative to the more distant one is necessary. Yet even that method comes rife with inherent uncertainties; uncertainties which may propagate all the way down the cosmic distance ladder.
To solve the greatest cosmic mysteries requires us to take the first step properly. Here's why we might not have done it right.
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This video explains how to solve examples on properties of definite integration.
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