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Patrick Steed
Attended Saint Leo University
Lives in Mulberry, Florida
2,443 followers|1,344,129 views
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Patrick Steed

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2Pac the Tank Engine...

Funny stuff via a dude called Señor Hoopaw and +YouTube​
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#RandPaul: Troll Me, and I'll Track Your Phone

Via +Mother Jones​
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One too many opinions from Hill staffer #ElizabethLauten, who attacked Obama’s daughters and resigned

What ever happened to this woman anyway?

Via +Washington Post​
In college, she wrote an opinion piece worrying about the perils of Facebook. That didn't stop her from stumbling on the Web site with her criticism of the Obama daughters.
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#NYC Statue of Liberty is awesome to view via the Staten Island Ferry. Very interesting overhead angle!
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Final boss level
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#CIA history of #KRYPTOS via +WIRED​​ and +Jack C Crawford​.
 
Finally, a New Clue to Solve the CIA’s Mysterious Kryptos Sculpture

In 1989, the year the Berlin Wall began to fall, American artist Jim Sanborn was busy working on his Kryptos sculpture, a cryptographic puzzle wrapped in a riddle that he created for the CIA’s headquarters and that has been driving amateur and professional cryptographers mad ever since.

To honor the 25th anniversary of the Wall’s demise and the artist’s 69th birthday this year, Sanborn has decided to reveal a new clue to help solve his iconic and enigmatic artwork. It’s only the second hint he’s released since the sculpture was unveiled in 1990 and may finally help unlock the fourth and final section of the encrypted sculpture, which frustrated sleuths have been struggling to crack for more than two decades.

The 12-foot-high, verdigrised copper, granite and wood sculpture on the grounds of the CIA complex in Langley, Virginia, contains four encrypted messages carved out of the metal, three of which were solved years ago. The fourth is composed of just 97 letters, but its brevity belies its strength. Even the NSA, whose master crackers were the first to decipher other parts of the work, gave up on cracking it long ago. So four years ago, concerned that he might not live to see the mystery of Kryptos resolved, Sanborn released a clue to help things along, revealing that six of the last 97 letters when decrypted spell the word “Berlin”—a revelation that many took to be a reference to the Berlin Wall.

To that clue today, he’s adding the next word in the sequence—“clock”—that may or may not throw a wrench in this theory. Now the Kryptos sleuths just have to unscramble the remaining 86 characters to find out.

Is a Clock a Clock?
Sanborn told WIRED that he’s always been fascinated by Berlin’s many clocks but the Berlin Clock in particular has intrigued him the most. The clock, also known as the Berlin Uhr or Set Theory Clock, was designed in the 1970s by inventor and tinkerer Dieter Binninger. It displays the time through illuminated colored blocks rather than numbers and requires the viewer to calculate the time based on a complex scheme.

A yellow lamp at the top of the clock blinks every two seconds while a row of red lamps beneath it represent five hours. Red lights on a second row denote one hour each, and time is calculated based on the number of lights illuminated. “So if in the first line 2 lamps are lit and in the second line 3 lamps, it’s 5+5+3=13h or 1 p.m.,” notes one description of the timepiece.
“Most people have no idea who Dieter is and all of the other people who make strange clocks in Berlin,” Sanborn says. “There’s a very interesting back story to [the Berlin Clock].”

The focus on the clock, however, may just be a bit of sly misdirection from Sanborn—who is known among Kryptos fans for his puckishness.

“Clock” could easily refer instead to a method devised by a Polish mathematician and cryptologist during World War II to crack Germany’s Enigma ciphers—a method that was expanded on by Alan Turing and his team at Bletchley Park who are credited with ultimately cracking Enigma. (It may be no coincidence that Sanborn has decided to release his new clue at the same time as The Imitation Game, a film about Turing’s work on Enigma, is opening in US theaters on Nov. 28.)

How Kryptos Has Remained Unsolved for 20 Years
Sanborn’s Kryptos sculpture was unveiled at the CIA on Nov. 3, 1990, a month that has a recurring theme in the sculpture’s ethos.

The artwork features a large block of petrified wood standing upright, with a tall copper plate scrolling out from the wood like a sheet of paper. At the sculpture’s base is a round pool with a fountain pump that sends water moving in a circular direction around the pool. Carved out of the copper plate are approximately 1,800 letters, some of them forming a cryptographic table based on a method developed by a 16th-century Frenchman named Blaise de Vigenere.
In 1995 a small group of cryptanalysts inside the NSA quietly deciphered the first three sections of the sculpture, though no one outside the agency and the CIA’s top brass knew about it. In 1998, CIA analyst David Stein cracked the same three messages using paper and pencil and about 400 lunch-time hours. Only his CIA colleagues knew of his success, however, because the agency didn’t publicize it. A year later, California computer scientist Jim Gillogly gained public notoriety when he cracked the same three messages using a Pentium II.

The first message is a poetic phrase that Sanborn composed:

“Between subtle shading and the absence of light lies the nuance of iqlusion.”

The second one hints at something buried:

“It was totally invisible. How’s that possible? They used the earth’s magnetic field. x The information was gathered and transmitted undergruund to an unknown location. x Does Langley know about this? They should: it’s buried out there somewhere. x Who knows the exact location? Only WW. This was his last message. x Thirty eight degrees fifty seven minutes six point five seconds north, seventy seven degrees eight minutes forty four seconds west. x Layer two.”

WW, Sanborn told WIRED in 2005, refers to William Webster, director of the CIA at the time of the sculpture’s completion. Sanborn was forced to provide Webster with the solution to the puzzle to reassure the CIA that it wasn’t something that would embarrass the agency.

The third message is a take on a passage from the diary of English Archaeologist Howard Carter describing the opening of King Tut’s tomb on Nov. 26, 1922.

“Slowly, desparatly slowly, the remains of passage debris that encumbered the lower part of the doorway was removed. With trembling hands I made a tiny breach in the upper left-hand corner. And then, widening the hole a little, I inserted the candle and peered in. The hot air escaping from the chamber caused the flame to flicker, but presently details of the room within emerged from the mist. x Can you see anything? q”

Sanborn has said that the first three sections contain clues to solving the final 97 letters but no one has figured out what those might be. After no progress cracking the last section, Sanborn released the “Berlin” clue four years ago, considering it “a significant clue.”

“I’m throwing it out there. It just makes that many fewer characters people have to figure out,” he told WIRED at the time.

The six letters that spell “Berlin”—NYPVTT—-are the 64th through 69th letters of the final 97 characters and the new clue “clock” are deciphered from the next five letters that follow it.

Code detectives worked to crack the puzzle following the Berlin revelation. Members of a popular Kryptos Yahoo Group led by Elonka Dunin, the foremost expert on Kryptos, tried for months to resolve it but to no avail.

Who knows if the new clue will prove to be any more helpful. And even if it is and sleuths decipher the final code, there’s an additional message they will still need to resolve. Once decrypted, the fourth section reveals a riddle, which Sanborn has said requires sleuths to be on the CIA grounds to solve.

The Mystery of the Riddle
“In part of the code that’s been deciphered, I refer to an act that took place when I was at the agency and a location that’s on the ground of the agency,” Sanborn said during a 2005 interview with WIRED. “So in order to find that place, you have to decipher the piece and then go to the agency and find that place.”

The riddle may refer to something Sanborn buried on the CIA grounds at the time he installed the sculpture, possibly in a location spelled out in section two of the sculpture, which lists a set of latitude and longitude coordinates: 38 57 6.5 N and 77 8 44 W. Sanborn has said they refer to “locations of the agency.”

Dunin has suggested that the coordinates may refer to the location of a Berlin Wall monument on the CIA grounds. Three slabs from the Berlin Wall sit at the spy agency’s headquarters, a gift from the German government. Sanborn has also told WIRED that the collapse of the wall was “big news” at the time he was “casting about” for things he wanted to include in his sculpture. However, the wall monument wasn’t dedicated at the CIA until 1992, two years after Kryptos was unveiled. Although the coordinates of the monument’s location—38 57 2.5 N, 77 8 40 W—differ from the coordinates mentioned in Kryptos by four seconds in both the latitude and longitude, Dunin has speculated that the CIA may have originally planned to position the monument at the coordinates Sanborn mentions on Kryptos but then later chose a different location. Alternatively, Sanborn may have been using an incorrect U.S. geological map when he created his sculpture and thus got the coordinates wrong, she notes. After all, Sanborn has other errors in his sculpture, both intentional and unintentional.

Kryptos includes intentional spelling errors and misaligned characters set higher on a line of text than characters around them. But in 2006, Sanborn realized he had also made an inadvertent error, a missing “x” that he mistakenly deleted from the end of a line in section two, a section that was already solved. He discovered the omission while doing a letter-by-letter comparison of the plaintext and coded text in preparation for a book about his work.

The “x” was supposed to signify a period or section-break at the end of a phrase. Sanborn removed it for aesthetic reasons, thinking it wouldn’t affect the way the puzzle was deciphered, but in fact it did. What sleuths had until then deciphered to say “ID by rows” was actually supposed to say “layer two.” The correction hasn’t helped anyone solve the rest of the puzzle, however, in the subsequent years.

Now this second clue, Sanborn hopes, will reinvigorate efforts to crack the mystery, though he has mixed views on whether he wants the journey to end. The artist has said he’d like to see Kryptos solved in his lifetime, but he also enjoys that some of the smartest minds in cryptography—including those at the CIA and NSA—continue to be baffled by his work.

Only two other people, aside from Sanborn, were initially said to know the solution to Kryptos: one was the retired chairman of the CIA’s Cryptographic Center Ed Scheidt, who helped Sanborn choose and alter the coding techniques for the sculpture. The other was William Webster, the CIA director who received a sealed envelope containing the solution at the sculpture’s dedication. However, in 2005 Sanborn revealed to WIRED that Scheidt and Webster only thought they knew the solution. In fact, he had deceived them.

In November 1989, after the East German government announced that its citizens were free from then on to cross over the Wall into West Berlin and West Germany, crowds of euphoric Germans began chipping away at the cement barrier. With this new clue provided by Sanborn, let the chipping away on Kryptos begin.                                                                                                                                                                                                 http://www.wired.com/2014/11/second-kryptos-clue/ 
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Judge eager to re-enter #NSA surveillance fight

Good for Judge Richard Leon a #freedomfighter! I never would have thought a George W. Bush appointed judge would rule against NSA surveillance. Total shocker!!

Via +POLITICO​
Judge Richard Leon repeatedly urged the case to move forward quickly.
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2016 #Congress facts on where and how our politicians spend their money. I like the #StephenFincher money trail. Tiffany & Co., Ruth Chris Steak House, etc...that's a lot of damn steak and jewelry. Right?!

#accountability and #transparency 
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Cryogenics - Did Walt Disney get it right?
Find out in this Cosmic Minute w/ Neil deGrasse Tyson, +Philip Plait and +Leighann Lord  https://soundcloud.com/startalk/cosmic-minute-freezing-ourselves-into-the-future
StarTalk Radio
Cosmic Minute: Freezing Ourselves Into the Future by StarTalk Radio
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Facing Fears by Pangea Productions: https://goo.gl/no1cJ0 #travel
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I originally thought it was simply a political attempt to hurt Clinton's chances at POTUS by a Republican Director of the FBI, James Comey, but Snowden is right. If personal servers are off-limits for classified materials then why isn't she in trouble? If her attorney doesn't have a clearance then how he can decide the legality of the material that was on her server? This means he can't view the material nor defend her in the first place. Right? Things to think.

Via +WIRED​​
 
Snowden is exactly right.
If anyone but Hillary Clinton had used a personal email server to send reportedly classified material, they would be prosecuted and lose their security clearance, Edward Snowden says.
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How about if he gives you a slice of the wedding cake?
What is the address of the jail where you will be staying?
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Collections Patrick is following
Education
  • Saint Leo University
    MBA.ISM, 2009 - 2012
    Marketing, Decision Making, etc. (6 more classes + internship required)
  • Saint Leo University
    BA.BA Management, BS.HCA, 2004 - 2008
    Business Computers, Epidemiology, Community Health, Health Care Organization, Medical Ethics, Catholic Traditions, Human Resources...
  • American Council on Exercise
    CPT (Certified Personal Trainer), 2004 - 2004
  • University of Florida
    BABA - Management (transferred), 2002 - 2003
    Business Law, Marketing, Anatomy and Physiology, Oral Communications, Gerontology......Pi Kappa Alpha Fall 2002 - Alpha Omega class of Alpha Eta Chapter.
  • Santa Fe Community College
    AA Business Administration, 2000 - 2002
    Microeconomics, Macroeconomics, Accounting I/II, Financial Accounting, Biology, Statistics, etc.
  • Buchholz High School
    Cooperative Business Education, 1993 - 1997
    Business related and some honors
Basic Information
Gender
Male
Birthday
April 13
Relationship
Single
Other names
Tiny, P-Money, Coach, Rain Man, Genius, Hercules, Lou, Overqualified, Doc, House
Story
Tagline
ambidextrous, polyglot, bookworm, technophile and renaissance man
Introduction
Organic, straight-edge'r, technophile and RENAISSANCE MAN (NOT INTO drugs, alcohol, cigarettes, toxins); #sober, spiritual, polyglot, social media enthusiast who enjoys and values equality, ethics, privacy, AND laws esp.; local, state, [Florida Statutes = F.S.] federal, Constitutional like FREEDOM OF SPEECH (1st Amendment), Bloggers' Law, FISA and FUSA laws, politics, domestic/foreign gov't and our/their policies....

Privacy notice:
To any person and/or institution and/or agent and/or agency of any governmental structure including, but not limited to, local or state governments, or the United States federal government who may use or monitor this website or any of its associated websites. If you are a person noted above, you do not have my permission to utilize any of my profile information nor any of the content contained herein including, but not limited to images posted or linked by me, and/ or the comments made by me. You are hereby notified that I do NOT grant ANY permission to disclose, copy, distribute, or disseminate the contents herein. The foregoing restrictions also apply to your employee(s), agent(s), student(s) or any personnel under your direction or control.
Work
Skills
Management, marketing, social media, customer service, night audit (hotel desk), administrative, sales, (ACE certified) personal training, bar/nightclub security, health care management, medical records, medical assisting, nutrition, bodybuilding, typing, data entry, Wi-Fi networking/security, HTML, Windows Office Suite (Word, PowerPoint, Excel, Outlook), Ubuntu, Oracle Virtual Box, firewall and antivirus software, organic fruit/vegetable growing, cooking, landscaping and irrigation
Places
Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Currently
Mulberry, Florida
Previously
Gainesville, Florida - Newberry, Florida - Sunrise, Florida - Plantation, Florida
Contact Information
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863-614-6160
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4314 Meadow Ridge Court, Mulberry, Florida 33860
Work
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Lay's Western Wear and Feed Incorporated is a mom and pops place to shop for feeds, vet supplies and other farm related supplies in the Mulberry (south Lakeland) area. They have the same prices and sometimes cheaper than places like Tractor Supply Company and they have a friendlier staff. If you want unique treats for your dog that are healthy and organic, they will have some of those too. There are some knowledgeable people that work there like an Andrea that will help you problem solve an issue. Just be sure if they say they have something that you ask for that you ask about 2-3x so you don't waste your time and gas driving all the way there (ie- 7 or 9-in-1 shot for your sick dog that she/they say they have in stock which is annoying and unprofessional).
• • •
Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago
Great service, very knowledgeable and affordable. I'd highly recommend them for PC building, adding any software/hardware components, formatting, helping with data recovery, or just about any computer related questions. **Note** If getting a rebate from someplace like Tiger Direct through them be sure to get it in writing, other wise you may not get it and/or it will be applied as a 'computer service' of your choosing.
Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago
Went to Ling's Buffet with a friend who definitely got his money's worth but I chose to enjoy their fresh sushi, a fillet of white fish and some stuffed mushrooms. It definitely hit the sushi/seafood spot but they've got everything from salads, BBQ, soups, and sweets to choose from. The atmosphere is relaxed and offers decent room for groups of people at booths or tables. Staff is friendly and keep an eye on you for refills or questions. Definitely going back. Good stuff!
• • •
Food: Very GoodDecor: Very GoodService: Excellent
Public - 2 years ago
reviewed 2 years ago
4 reviews
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Great gym with a clean facility. It has a decent set of weights, nice set of machines, good cardiovascular equipment with music or television to plug headphones into and listen to, as well as an outdoor pool for swimming. Some of the staff could afford to be friendlier, talkative or more cheerful though.
Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago