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Pamela Rutledge
656 followers -
Director, Media Psychology Research Center | consultant | Professor | Author | Speaker | Researcher | Mom | Dog lover
Director, Media Psychology Research Center | consultant | Professor | Author | Speaker | Researcher | Mom | Dog lover

656 followers
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Pamela Rutledge's posts

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Media Psychology applies the psychology to media and technology.  The issues we study are central to media impact, design, audience engagement and sharing behaviors.  Join me Thursday July 13, 4pm PT in a webinar to learn about the field and the topics we study.  I will talk about our three programs--the PhD, MA and two Certificates i( Brand Psychology and Media Neuroscience.)  I will be available to answer your questions - What is media psychology?  What is it good for?  How will it help your career?  

Sign up here:
http://fielding.force.com/EventListing/?eventId=70150000001DZGlAAO

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We all want to look good.  How we define "good" is a question of values.  The emphasis on the visual as a value is amplified by, but not invented by, social media.  It is how a primary way that people, especially young people, connect today.  Rather than blame the tools (always a popular solution as it absolves us of any responsibility), let's recognize this shift as an opportunity to deal with the real issues that drive this vulnerability-identity and self-worth--and focus on the values behind them.  Social media may trigger vulnerabilities but it can also spread new ways of seeing beauty and changing the discussion to what matters--what we do, not how we look.  Don't celebrate Alicia Keys for going make-up free--although that's awesome- but it keeps the conversation on how she looks.  What matters is her amazing artistic achievements and positive (and enduring) contributions to popular culture.  Puffed lips, as with all trends, aren't sustainable.

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The human drive for social connection will trump all other aspects, expanding the Internet of things.  The challenge and opportunity is to establish best practices that support human growth, flourishing and social justice without getting bogged down in technophobia and impose knee jerk restrictions and regulations.  These may assuage people's anxiety but it's a false sense of security that buries rather than solves problems. (Except maybe giving politicians more fodder for election speeches).

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Media Literacy: Useful decision tree from Visme to demonstrate copyright/permissions process for images.  Not just for kids!

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I like to think that as a society, we are losing their taste for political bullying and labeling that reduces people to faceless others.  This strategy is not only mean-spirited, it leaves us isolated, anxious and fearful.  This runs counter to our fundamental goal as human-- to be connected to others.  The positive emotions we get through affiliation and social connection, make us more creative, open-minded and productive, not to mention more fun to be around.  If you see a positive meme, share it.  You'll be doing the world a favor.

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I love Headspace's meditation app. One of the lessons of meditation is to really listen to yourself, and that’s where deciding how you need to grieve can be a product of sitting quietly and listening to your own needs.

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Reaching out and sharing a thoughtful anecdote about a loved one is almost always appreciated. It reinforces our sense of meaning and purpose in life to show how people matter. It make us feel supported in the grieving process.

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Disrespect burns bridges. Shaming doesn't work if you want buy-in. It's bad enough that our President resorts to name calling, but now we Californians have a Governor who calls anyone who disagrees with him about additional taxes on autos & gas "freeloaders." One of the first things we teach in conflict resolution is to avoid blanket labeling and name-calling. This tactic reduces the other party to a faceless other, diminishes their humanity and pretty much eliminates any chance of attitude change. Trump won't always have executive privilege. Brown won't always have a "super-majority" behind him. Both should be careful. Their actions as role models are disrespectful of society as a whole. Naïve as it may be, I personally expect more from all elected officials--at least the ones who want my vote.

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Referring to excessive cellphone use as addiction is a misnomer. Addictions are serious stuff. Being mindful about behavior, however, and making conscious decisions about how you spend your time is important. Taking responsibility for your behavior starts with identifying goals and getting a realistic assessment of the way you use your time. Apps can be valuable tools in providing objective assessment as our ability to estimate all kinds of things has been shown to be very poo, from calories and exercise to time spent on Facebook. We unconsciously adjust to support our sense of self-worth. But apps are only as useful as they are actually used. Compliance is always an issue. Apps that provide game-based structures with rewards, clear achievable goals and feedback loops can help.

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Positive psychology can build the future, moving us away from occupation-based identity to strengths-based identity.  Traditional models train people to equate what they do with who they are (i.e., what do you want to be when you grow up) rather than to develop strengths, acquire critical thinking and flexible skills and attitudes that fit a rapidly changing world.
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