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The New York Public Library
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There's no shortage of artworks inspired by Joseph Conrad's classic Heart of Darkness, but can you imagine a film adaptation by Orson Welles? In fact, it almost happened: http://on.nypl.org/1ImSU0x
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Thank You !!!
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This Japanese craftsman and book conservator can make your tattered pocket dictionary look brand new, and he does it one page at a time. http://on.nypl.org/1FeXonv
For the past 33 years Japanese craftsman Okano Nobuo has been repairing tattered books and reconstituting them to look brand new. When a customer brought in an old Japanese-English dictionary that looked like it had been through a few wars, Okano approached it like an art conservationist repairing
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How did Manhattan's Hell's Kitchen get its name? And what did Brooklyn neighborhood-life look like in the 19th century? Hey, you've got New York neighborhood questions, we've got New York neighborhood answers: http://on.nypl.org/1A7DIl4
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Cool
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Sharpen those pencils, everyone. On May 21, super artist Jerome Walford of Forward Comix is stopping by our 125th Street Branch Library to teach you to create your own super characters. http://on.nypl.org/1QKd2uV
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Link please
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The Public Library, a book-length photographic celebration of America's libraries by Robert Dawson, also includes essays that illuminate how libraries and librarians serve communities across the country. Right now, thanks to @[Lit Hub], you can read a couple of them online: http://on.nypl.org/1d40DDS
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It was 1915 when the traveling salesman Gregor Samsa first awoke as a bug. This year, 100 years after the first publication of The Metamorphosis, Benedict Cumberbatch reads Franz Kafka's masterpiece aloud for the BBC — and it is awesome. Listen here: http://on.nypl.org/1FeWQ0S
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+The New York Public Library​ oh wow! I remember reading this for my English class as a high school senior. The teacher I had was a little bit like Robin Williams' character in "Dead Poet's Society". Franz Kafka blew me away with his bizarre story of a person changing into a cockroach. What a strange concept!? Why in the world would anyone ever think of such a story?

It's only now..that I can appreciate Kafka's story...maybe not the way it was intended..as a possible social commentary. I can embrace it not so much the content of the story itself, but rather the creativity and imagination that went behind it and how the story itself illicits a definite response from the reader. Whether the response is positive or negative is not the important part. Rather..the importance lies in the ability to make the reader FEEL something. After all, isn't that what life is about? To feel things and experience things through our senses? What is the point of going through life like a robot...everyday the same thing?

Books..words...can enlighten us or even jumpstart in us emotions, feelings that we didn't even realize we had forgotten. Feelings that are so easy for us to embrace as babies when we soak in the world around us like a sponge. As we grow older. ..often times we become jaded, cynical, hurt, and we stop feeling. But ..we are granted life and to not be grateful and take advantage of every opportunity to LIVE and FEEL and be affected would be truly tragic.

We should embrace experiences.. that may be out of our comfort zone. ..but may open our eyes to beauty and tragedy and joy and pain and a myriad of emotions that make us human. To live...vivir.....to keep pressing on despite negative odds...to breathe..to hurt..to heal..to forgive, to love..

Life is too short to live with regret and hate. This is something i am learning more and more everyday. Be the better person and turn the other cheek..because you may not be given tomorrow.

My mom died several years ago and it really pains me to think how I was often so busy and wrapped up in my own issues ...that in didn't stop to take the time to give her some real quality time. She was quick to criticize and complain, a real Debbie downer, but I was a sounding board for her and should have been stronger. I should have taken it and not be so critical, but instead I focused on the actual content of the nagging and complaining. When it got to be about me...I withdrew. What I wouldn't give for another day to just spend with her, accept and listen to all her complaints because she needed someone to vent to....and I could be that for her. It saddens me to think I don't have that chance anymore.

Omg..hmmm...I digress. I will stop. Oh captain my captain! Carpe Diem! 
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On the the Today Show, correspondent Jenna Bush Hager and her mother, Laura Bush, share a mother-daughter afternoon at one of their very favorite places -- a branch of The New York Public Library: http://on.nypl.org/1PuWXa2
Ahead of Mother's Day, TODAY contributing correspondent Jenna Bush Hager, her mom, Laura Bush, and Jenna's daughter Mila check out a New York City library and head to a park to spend some special time together.
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Nnpv 
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Carol Reed's The Third Man began as a novella. The film's writer, the novelist Graham Greene, wouldn't have it any other way. Here's why: http://on.nypl.org/1EVxZ0z
In Page To Screen, we compare a movie to the book that spawned it. The analysis goes into deep detail about specific plot points—in other words, you’ve been warned.Graham Greene’s The Third Man (1950) and Carol Reed’s The Third Man (1949)The Third Man was not the first screenplay Graham Greene ever
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Wonderful movie 
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Author Junot Díaz remembers that his life in the US began when he discovered libraries. http://on.nypl.org/1HhzgTA
Over the past decade, City funding for libraries has been cut by nearly 20%. Tell Mayor de Blasio and City leaders that New Yorkers need more and deserve better.
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I suppose it would depend on the text they have. If there is one book expressed within,there must be no hindrance of any arthour.
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Substance abuse can be one of the scariest and most difficult challenges to face, and it's not just a problem for adults. These books and resources on substance abuse for young adults just may help them overcome addiction. http://on.nypl.org/1HiFqQw
Addiction is a difficult disease to live with, no matter how old you are. As a teen, it may be especially hard. If you are looking for reading material about addiction or a place to go for help, the library is here.
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Can you imagine A.A. Milne's Winnie-the-Pooh or Roald Dahl's BFG looking any other way? Neither can we. Meet the illustrators that made some of literature's best-known characters iconic: http://on.nypl.org/1cEEWcG
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The NPR History Department asks: "Do we really need libraries?" Their answer: Yes, absolutely. http://on.nypl.org/1QKdd9I #investinlibraries
Between 1886 and 1919, Andrew Carnegie planted nearly 1,700 libraries across America. Over the years they grew. Now they are trying to survive.
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I'd be lost without the library.  Every time I move I have a library card before I change over my driver's license lol. It's my refuge when the world hates me. Instant feeling of peace when I walk in.  I have no idea why, but it's my place to be.
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Have them in circles
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Inspire lifelong learning, advance knowledge, strengthen communities
Introduction
The New York Public Library, NYPL for short, is comprised of 4 research libraries and 88 branch libraries, scattered throughout Manhattan, the Bronx, and Staten Island. Stop by one of our branches for exciting programming, visit one of our captivating exhibitions, or check out our website to get instant, free access to books, e-books, music, DVDs, and much more!