Profile

Cover photo
National Museum of American History
225,064 followers|7,297,053 views
AboutPostsPhotosYouTube

Stream

 
We tried these 1950s dishes, so you don't have to (but they weren't all that bad!):

🍴 Waldorf Salad
🍴 BBQ Bologna
🍴 Baked Tomatoes with Chip-Cheese Topping
🍴 Tomato Soup Cake

http://s.si.edu/1950sFood

#FoodHistory   #RetroRecipes  
20
3
Linda Kay Price's profile photoGreg Jones's profile photoGary Ronan's profile photo
3 comments
 
I was born in 52' so I grew up on this kind of fair. Unfortunately, I grew up in Minnesota to Scandinavian parent's and all my food's were various shades of white! Black pepper was an exotic spice in my family!!
BBQ bologna? More like boiled within an inch of it's life! and if one was lucky, you could put some ketchup on it if you could find some that was bland enough!!
Add a comment...
 
Today in 1852: Pictorialist photographer Gertrude Käsebier is born. This is her photo of Sioux Indian child Mary Lone Bear.

After viewing the grand parade of Buffalo Bill's Wild West troupe as part of New York City performances, Käsebier embarked on a project to photograph them. Käsebier had spent her childhood on the Great Plains, and retained many vivid, happy memories of playing with nearby American Indian children.

She sent a letter to William "Buffalo Bill" Cody, requesting permission to photograph in her studio the Sioux Indians traveling with the show. Within weeks, she began to photograph the men, women, and children, formally and informally. Friendships developed, and her photography of these individuals continued for more than a decade.

Mary Lone Bear was one of the few Sioux children Käsebier was allowed to photograph. Her father, Chief Lone Bear, and brother, Samuel "Sammy" Lone Bear, were also photographed.

More of Käsebier's photos: http://s.si.edu/1srGvCL
22
3
Add a comment...
 
There's a new way for people like you to become more involved with the museum.

The Director's Fund for Annual Giving brings together individuals from across the country who have a passion for our nation's story and believe in our mission to promote a greater awareness of our nation's history. In return, supporters enjoy a more intimate relationship with the museum, including exclusive communications, recognition opportunities, and more.

Annual support at all levels helps provide the vital resources necessary to sustain and develop our exhibitions, programs, research, national educational initiatives and more.

Please make a gift today to the Director's Fund for Annual Giving and support the museum's programming and so much more: http://s.si.edu/NMAHdonate

#philanthropy   #AmericanHistory  
22
1
Add a comment...
 
We're opening a small gallery of photos of celebrations in African American history—snapshots of weddings, anniversaries, christenings, and more. But we need YOUR help deciding which photos make the cut. Click through to select your favorites: http://s.si.edu/PhotoVote1
18
1
Add a comment...
 
Today in 1869: First transcontinental railroad completed, joining the east and west rails at Promontory, Utah. A national network of iron, steel, and steam, represented by the driving of the Golden Spike, became a unifying metaphor in the years after the Civil War.

Traveling west with his mother in June 1869, eight-year-old Hart F. Farwell stopped at Promontory to cut a chip from a special railroad tie. He wanted a souvenir after the hoopla of the driving of the "Golden Spike" into the "last tie" to complete the rail link the month before on May 10.

But, alas, the railroad tie from which young Farwell cut this chip was not the real "last tie." After the driving of the Golden Spike, the ceremonial last tie was immediately removed and replaced with a pine tie no different from the others. In the weeks and months following the ceremony, relic hunters whittled replacement ties to bits at the rate of about one tie a week. The wooden chip that Farwell cut from one of these ties was his lifelong possession.

More strange relics and souvenirs in our collection: http://s.si.edu/1UJ700I

#Trainspotting   #RailwayHistory   #RailroadHistory   #GoldenSpike   #SouvenirNation  
18
3
Add a comment...
 
Curator Tim Winkle explains how this (slightly creepy looking) 1890s smoke helmet was designed to work.

#Firefighting   #FirefightersDay   #AmericanHistory  
6
2
Add a comment...
Have them in circles
225,064 people
Nicolas Carra's profile photo
smelly velly's profile photo
Jen A's profile photo
Javier Garcia (javi8xo)'s profile photo
Ares Viking's profile photo
Tyler Clifton's profile photo
Bruce Moring's profile photo
Joe Aiken's profile photo
Mia Conde's profile photo
 
Today in 1788: South Carolina ratifies the U.S. Constitution, the eighth state to do so after Maryland. It took 10 months for the first nine states to approve the Constitution. Delaware was first on December December 7, 1787.

These face vessels were likely made in the Edgefield District of South Carolina by enslaved black potters. Anecdotal and archaeological evidence has been used to establish that enslaved potters were making face vessels in the Edgefield area before the Civil War.
See more face vessels in our collection: http://s.si.edu/1qEA265
19
3
Add a comment...
 
It's ‪#BikeToWorkWeek!

Fellowship has long been a part of bicycling, with riders joining groups like the national League of American Wheelmen as well as smaller clubs. This is a Columbia Bicycle Club ribbon from a local club in Pennsylvania, documenting the group's 1892 trip to Washington, D.C., for a larger meet.

More on camaraderie in bicycling: http://s.si.edu/highwheelin

‪#‎NationalBikeWeek‬ ‪#‎ObjectProject‬
10
2
Add a comment...
 
During World War II, the US government forcibly removed over 120,000 Japanese Americans from the Pacific Coast. These individuals, two-thirds of them U.S. citizens, were sent to ten camps built throughout the western interior of the United States. Many would spend the next three years living under armed guard, behind barbed wire.

What lessons does this episode in history hold for us today? Join us to discuss this with historians, activists, and policy makers during our National Youth Summit on Tuesday, May 17.

The live, online program is open to students, teachers, and the public.
👉 Register here: http://s.si.edu/janys
👉 Conversation kit: http://s.si.edu/janyskit

#SIYouthSummit   #JapaneseAmericanHeritage  
18
7
Charlie Pritchard's profile photo
 
And it was a Democrat President who did that.
Add a comment...
 
Today in 1997: IBM's supercomputer Deep Blue makes chess history by defeating champion Gary Kasparov. Operators used this Logitech mouse to manage its operation.

Explore our computer history collections: http://s.si.edu/1Npnk6o

#ComputerHistory   #Chess  
15
Add a comment...
 
Produced by Gino Grimaldi, "EMERGENCY!" was a pre-reality TV show devoted to accuracy, entertainment, and education: http://s.si.edu/emergency72
The pre-reality television show EMERGENCY! premiered on January 27, 1972. Health- and medical-themed programs such as the radio and television drama Dr. Kildare had long been popular, but EMERGENCY! broke new ground. Set in Los Angeles, EMERGENCY! paid great attention to detail as it told the stories of fictional paramedics and doctors as they went about their jobs saving lives. The show didn't just look real, it was actually quite close to the r...
22
5
Ericka Gilbert's profile photoMichael Whiteman's profile photo
2 comments
 
I like the one where they put up the canvas sheet so the sniper couldn't see them on the billboard walkway.......I'm sure that was real.......good grief....Start an IV with ringers lactate and transport
Add a comment...
 
Today we launch a new initiative to collect, document, and preserve America's #BeerHistory: s.si.edu/BrewHistory

Image: Beer tray showing a driver and a brewer working together with a German inscription that says“Liberty, Equality, Fraternity.” Circa 1905. Currently on view in the "American Enterprise" exhibition at the museum.
21
2
Jason Allen's profile photoMario G's profile photo
2 comments
Mario G
+
1
2
1
 
+Jason Allen That's true. I didn't catch that one. VMT.
Add a comment...
People
Have them in circles
225,064 people
Nicolas Carra's profile photo
smelly velly's profile photo
Jen A's profile photo
Javier Garcia (javi8xo)'s profile photo
Ares Viking's profile photo
Tyler Clifton's profile photo
Bruce Moring's profile photo
Joe Aiken's profile photo
Mia Conde's profile photo
Contact Information
Contact info
Phone
(202) 633-1000
Email
Story
Tagline
Real Stories. Real Stuff.
Introduction
On Flag Day, Saturday, June 14, 2014, the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History invites Americans around the globe to join in a worldwide commemoration of the flag and the anthem. Raise it Up! Anthem for America will be a call to millions of Americans to participate in singing "The Star-Spangled Banner" simultaneously, led by a special guest on the National Mall, steps from the original flag that flew over Fort McHenry in 1814.

Visit us on the National Mall
1400 Constitution Avenue NW Washington DC 20560