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98 years ago, John F. Kennedy was born. Learn about the Kennedy half dollar: http://ow.ly/N8wHD
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Cactus Tactical's profile photoCarlos Gonzalez's profile photoSteve Killebrew's profile photou antonio bunting's profile photo
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That's Awesome Michael !!!
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Sunday, May 31, is THE LAST DAY to see President Lincoln's carriage on display in our lobby before its return to the Studebaker National Museum.

It's the carriage that transported President Lincoln, Mary Todd Lincoln, and their guests to Ford's Theatre on April 14, 1865. There, they saw a performance of "Our American Cousin." Around 10 p.m. that evening, John Wilkes Booth entered the Presidential Box and assassinated the president. 
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Timmy Crawford's profile photoAna Hitta's profile photoBrandi Naish's profile photoMarcos Andrés Barros Ketterer's profile photo
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6 objects for Jewish American Heritage Month: http://bit.ly/JewishHistMay 

#JewishAmericanHeritage   #AmericanHistory  
Jewish American objects in our collections shed light on why Jewish families immigrated to the United States, and the many ways they contributed to American society.
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After World War II, many newly affluent Americans flocked to the tropics. People developed a taste for casual living and the distinctive local foods and drink. Returning home, they re-created these experiences in suburban backyards, sometimes BBQ-ing in hats like this one from 1965.

#Grilling #FoodHistory #Haberdashery #History
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John H's profile photoCam Fraser's profile photoS Droz's profile photoCory Adama's profile photo
 
Nice hat to use in Brazil or Punta Cana
:-)
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A closer look at the oldest microscope in our collection: http://bit.ly/microsc0pe 
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Before Memorial Day, learn the history of the battlefield cross: http://bit.ly/BattlefieldCross 

#MemorialDay   #AmericanHistory  
The first appearance of the "battlefield cross" is a matter of conjecture. It might have been during the Civil War, to signify a dead soldier to be gathered and buried during a truce called for that purpose. Soldier dead were buried in graves in temporary cemeteries near the battlefields, identified by simple wooden plaques. The configuration of the rifle pointed downward with a helmet perched on the stock was a more common sight during World War...
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Ken Harbit (Pogi)'s profile photoLucy Ndirangu's profile photoFriends of Schoharie Crossing's profile photoSarah Howard's profile photo
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Agreed.
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Which flip phone, Blackberry, server, laptop, GPS unit, or iPhone will be historically significant in a few decades? It's hard to tell. Our curators discuss the tech gadgets they've collected and why: http://bit.ly/1JY4uPf 

Many of these will be on display in our #BusinessHistory  exhibition, opening July 1. 
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William Ramsay, a Scottish tobacco merchant in Alexandria, Virginia, kept a ledger book from 1753 to 1756 to track purchases and payments for his business. We asked a group of students to help decode his files for our new #BusinessHistory  exhibition, opening July 1. They cracked the code and discovered some fascinating things: http://bit.ly/baddledor 

#AmericanHistory   #Business   #Virginia  
Several years ago, Dr. Ann Smart Martin and I met at a conference and discovered our mutual interest in making eighteen and nineteenth-century documents accessible through material culture.
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This is a great source!
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Today in 1937: The Golden Gate Bridge opens. This photo was taken by Ansel Adams in 1932, before the bridge's construction started the following year.

Here's the story of the photo: One morning in 1932, Adams awoke to a sky filled with fast moving, rolling clouds, and took his 8" x 10" camera to the sea cliffs of the Golden Gate to capture the scene. Frustrated by the constantly changing composition and high winds, Adams nevertheless took a 1/25 second exposure with remarkable clarity and sharp focus.

In his book "Examples," Adams recalls that a photographer once protested that this photograph was "too pretty" to show the real Golden Gate, but the image's continuing popularity proves the relevance of Adams' vision.

More: http://bit.ly/1cgAU9Z

#Photography   #GoldenGateBridge   #AmericanHistory   #California   
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Cassie B.'s profile photoElizabeth Weston's profile photoKen Bryant's profile photoTobi P's profile photo
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What a wonderful post. Thank you.
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120 years ago today, photographer Dorothea Lange was born. As a government photographer during the Great Depression, she took this picture at a migrant farmworkers' camp near Nipomo, California. Lange's caption recorded her impressions of the family's plight: "Destitute pea pickers ... a 32-year-old mother of seven children."

First published in a San Francisco newspaper, this poignant image became one of the most famous photographs of the Depression era, emblematic of the hardships suffered by poor migrant families.

#AmericanHistory   #Photography  
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.....................so so so so so so so so so sosorry
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During World War I, seven million Belgian people were cut off from food and supplies by the German invasion and British blockade. Belgian lace makers made "War Laces" like this one to garner support from buyers in Allied countries. 

This round linen table cover contains the inscription "1915 Ardoye - Convent of the Holy Childhood of Jesus - Orphans" in the center. Ardoye (Ardooie) is in West Flanders, Belgium, in the area where the German army used poison gas for the first time on the western front.

The table cover is centered with bobbin lace. Bruges flower lace as well as tape lace and braided mesh techniques were utilized by the Belgian lace makers, who made this during World War I.

See more examples of War Lace: http://bit.ly/ww1laces

#lace   #textile   #TextileTuesday   #WorldWar1   #WW1   #History  
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I love Bruges. It's one of my favorite places on Earth.
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Today in 1768: Dolley Madison, wife of President James Madison, is born. This silk satin open robe is hand-embroidered with flowers, butterflies, dragonflies, and phoenixes. It is typical of the style of the late 1810s. Learn more about Dolley's role in the White House: http://bit.ly/1rUrlBa

#FLOTUS   #AmericanHistory  
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S Droz's profile photoPoppy Fields's profile photoLOURDES CUISON's profile photoMelanie Lawson's profile photo
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 For the date of the Historical time,  this gown is quite beautiful.  Unlike the wardrobe(if you can call it this) of today, which leaves much to be desired.
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Introduction
On Flag Day, Saturday, June 14, 2014, the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History invites Americans around the globe to join in a worldwide commemoration of the flag and the anthem. Raise it Up! Anthem for America will be a call to millions of Americans to participate in singing "The Star-Spangled Banner" simultaneously, led by a special guest on the National Mall, steps from the original flag that flew over Fort McHenry in 1814.

Visit us on the National Mall
1400 Constitution Avenue NW Washington DC 20560