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The National Gallery
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One of the greatest collections of Western European painting
One of the greatest collections of Western European painting

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To celebrate Mother's Day, here is Louis Jean François Lagrenée's 'Maternal Affection'. Here, three women tend to two infants within a sunlit loggia. Depictions of motherhood became increasingly popular in the second half of the 18th century. See this painting in Room 33: http://bit.ly/2mYpn4F
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'Willows' is the largest, and latest in date, of eight Charles-François Daubigny paintings in our collection. Depicting willows growing on the banks of a river, it shows the artist in the final decade of his career continuing to paint the luminous forest and riverside landscapes with which he had first established his reputation some three decades earlier: http://bit.ly/2monVNJ
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Will you be visiting 'The Credit Suisse Exhibition: Michelangelo & Sebastiano' this weekend? Book now, Members go free: http://bit.ly/2miMrOR
This painting by Sebastiano del Piombo depicts either Judith (the Old Testament heroine who beheaded Holofernes) or Salome (who requested the beheading of John the Baptist). Both were common subjects at the time. The refinement of the woman's features and the flashing blue sleeve show Sebastiano's virtuoso handling of oil paint.
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You can now watch the first of our Talks for All series, focusing on Botticelli's painting 'Venus and Mars', here: http://bit.ly/2mYSpRL Caroline Campbell, The Jacob Rothschild Head of the Curatorial Department, looks at some possible classical sources for this work and explores the reasons why it might have been painted for Botticelli's patron in Florence.
Find out more about our Talks for All series here: http://bit.ly/2mZ62jL
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'Australia's Impressionists' closes this Sunday 26 March. Book now, Members go free: http://bit.ly/2gP9X44
This sketch of Trafalgar Square in London was painted by the artist Tom Roberts, who features in 'Australia's Impressionists'. Roberts visited London for a second time in the early twentieth century, when he painted this scene with his back to the National Gallery.
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Jacob Maris painted 'A Drawbridge in a Dutch Town' in about 1875. The town pictured has not been identified but it is not necessarily meant to be a particular place, as Maris did not greatly value topographical accuracy. See this painting in Gallery A: http://bit.ly/2mFeSEQ
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Starting in September 2017 the MA in The Art Market and the History of Collecting is offered by The University of Buckingham and the National Gallery. The programme will investigate American and European art markets, and cultures of collecting from the Renaissance to the present day. Learn more about the course and how to apply here: http://bit.ly/2lP3SXV
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Anthony van Dyck was born #OnThisDay in 1599. He was the most important Flemish painter of the 17th century after Rubens, whose works influenced the young Van Dyck. He also studied and was profoundly influenced by the work of Italian artists, above all, Titian. His double portrait of Lord John Stuart and his brother, Lord Bernard Stuart hangs in Room 31: http://bit.ly/2mL5zSr
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Nicolas Poussin painting 'Landscape with a Man scooping Water from a Stream' in about 1637. The landscape was probably executed for Cassiano dal Pozzo, a friend and patron of Poussin, or for Cassiano's younger brother, Carlo Antonio. In contrast to much of Poussin's work, the picture does not seem to be based on any literary sources. The painting hangs in Room 29: http://bit.ly/2n4FamJ
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Narcisse-Virgilio Diaz de la Peña painted 'The Storm' in 1871. The painting, with its dramatic sky, bold brushwork and colour, is typical of Diaz's later work. Diaz was an inspiration to younger French artists, including the Impressionists. See this painting in Gallery A, open every Sunday: http://bit.ly/2mhodRY
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