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barefootmeg
Works at Forgotten Fort Collins
Attended University of Michigan
1,624 followers|2,240,666 views
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barefootmeg

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I've searched the net on this topic and came up empty. So I decided to write my own perspective on Christianity and how it relates to historic preservation.
 
Rolling into a new year is often a time of self-reflection and assessment. I have been thinking a lot about how I spend my time and as I get more actively involved in historic preservation in northern Colorado, I've had to ask myself, is this where I want my focus to be?

As a Christian, my world-view leads me to look at things through the lens of the Bible. So that's what I decided to do. And I've hopefully written in such a way that though this article is full of Scripture quotes, even if you're not a Christian you might still find a lot of good information and tidbits worthy of reflection in regards to historic preservation.

So no matter what your background or point of view, I hope you'll find this article to be interesting. And I'd love to hear your thoughts and your own point of view.

http://bit.ly/Christian-perspective-Historic-preservation
In the beginning, God made a place. He put people in that place and told them to care for it. And when they consumed a part of the place that shouldn't have been consumed, their punishment was to be exiled from that place. This is a huge oversimplification of the first few chapters of the book of Genesis, ...
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barefootmeg

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Clay with antibiotic properties, even against resistant strains of bacteria. That's kinda cool.
A naturally occurring clay, used in traditional Native American medicine, shows promise as an antibiotic.
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barefootmeg

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Giving antibiotics to cattle as part of their regular diet leads to greatly increased levels of methane, a potent greenhouse gas, being produced as their dung decomposes.

What a great example of how we make a decision to do such and such, only to find out decades down the road that there were substantial unintended consequences with what we were doing. We've known that giving antibiotics proactively to cattle has increased bacterial resistance to the drugs. But this is an example of how the unintended consequences progress down through the food chain.

http://www.the-scientist.com/?articles.view/articleNo/46157/title/Antibiotic-Affects-Cow-Dung
Researchers assess some of the downstream effects of treating livestock with a broad-spectrum antibiotic.
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barefootmeg

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This is incredibly cool. Must have taken forever to put together with lots of trial and error.

https://youtu.be/NQZRy3nKwNQ
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Here's some pics I took on Wednesday. 
11 new photos · Album by barefootmeg
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yay, the goog let me comment on individual pics now! I think they've been working on the Google Photos Albums thing.

barefootmeg

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Just because everyone knows it's true doesn't mean it is. And just because someone's debunked it doesn't mean that's true either. 

Falling down the rabbit hole of truth....
In 2012, network scientist and data theorist Samuel Arbesman published a disturbing thesis: What we think of as established knowledge decays over time. According to his book “The Half-Life of Facts…
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Yep...I give it a second "wow."  It reminds me how poorly my questions were received in grad school by some of the professors (or was it only the Marxist professor?), when I questioned the reliance on published studies that never were officially audited.  It was clearly disconcerting that I would even suggest that maybe the studies were inaccurate, or even deeply biased.

barefootmeg

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This is an interesting article on the current economy and what businesses need to do to stay healthy in our changing and unstable world economy. It's by Jeff Immelt, the CEO of GE. His thesis is that companies need to localize to be nibble, to get around protectionist barriers, and to do the most good for the people in the countries where they have a presence. It's an interesting read.

"Change requires new business models that are leaner, faster, more decentralized. Complex and centralized bureaucracies are obsolete. GE is pushing capability to local teams who are empowered to take risks without second guessing."

"Success requires hundreds of little things, and decisions made with a local context. A good global leader has an appreciation for how people do their work in a local culture. They try to make a teams’ work meaningful to their country. This allows us to hire the best talent in every country where we compete."

"Over time I realized that progress counts for more than perfection and that anything worthwhile takes persistence and resilience."

https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/preparing-whats-next-jeff-immelt
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barefootmeg

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One of the many great comics you can read for free at GoComics.com! Follow us for giveaways & giggles.
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giggles

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Pics from my walk on Monday. 
10 new photos · Album by barefootmeg
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I so love that one just before the end, with those shadows it looks like aliens walking.

barefootmeg

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I've finally gotten everything set up and running so that Google autouploads my photos. So now I can share the pics I take each morning even though I still haven't figured out a good way to send Instagrams to G+.

(Now I've got to figure out how to get these albums to include the videos that I shot at the same time.) 
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hmmm indeed. I recently shared a Google Photos album and it showed the cover photo in my post.

still, I'm pleased to see you're making progress! and nice pics!

barefootmeg

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This is a really interesting article about how one half of your brain tends to stay more active the first night you sleep somewhere new. By the second night, you sleep more soundly, presumably because your brain no longer feels like it needs to be on the alert since you made it safely through the night in that location once before. 
The first night people sleep in a new place, one of their brain hemispheres remains somewhat alert, a study shows.
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Tagline
I'm not trying to be disagreeable. I just want to get at the truth.
Introduction
Xian, INTJ, usually barefoot, brown is my black, currently on the GAPS diet, concerned with issues of poverty, education, and preserving our history in order that we know the story in which we are a part. 
Bragging rights
I'm not afraid of a little kombucha scoby in my drink.
Education
  • University of Michigan
    Math, 1987 - 1991
  • University of San Francisco
    Teaching ESL, 1995 - 1996
Collections barefootmeg is following
Work
Occupation
I'm the ForgottenFortCollins.com blogger with the Scoop Blogs Network.
Employment
  • Forgotten Fort Collins
    Blogger, 2014 - present
    I write the Forgotten Fort Collins blog which is a part of the Scoop Blog Network.
  • CFHL
    Office Manager, 2003 - present
  • Detroit Public Schools
    Math Teacher, 1991 - 1995
  • Bridgemont High School
    Teacher, 1996 - 2001
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Gender
Female