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MD Anderson Cancer Center
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No food is fresher than what’s growing in your garden – as long as you take good care of it. And, the health of your plants starts with the soil.

“Use organic soil or soil free of pesticides and chemicals. This encourages the growth of nutrient-rich plants,” says Pedro Martinez, supervisor of the physical plant and caretaker of the Healthy Living Garden at MD Anderson.

Get more expert tips to start your healthy, home garden: http://bit.ly/1eAzg3v #healthyeating #gardening #gardeningtips #endcancer  
 
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Diana Chow never expected that a trip to the ER would result in a stage 4 high-grade serous ovarian cancer diagnosis. She pulled a muscle while helping her sister move furniture and was taken to the hospital. There, a CT scan resulted in a much more serious diagnosis: ovarian cancer.
 
Diana came to MD Anderson for her ovarian cancer treatment, where she’s grateful to have options with each new round of chemotherapy and radiation. Diana also underwent genetic testing and tested positive for the BRCA1 gene.
 
“I want my children to be proactive with this test so they can prevent getting stage 4 cancer,” she says.

READ HER STORY: http://bit.ly/1ee2F3o #ovariancancer #endcancer
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+MD Anderson Cancer Center Hey MD anderson Center, I have a community that you would like. Please give us a visit. 
We are here:  https://plus.google.com/u/0/communities/113505868071404301197

It will be the biggest supercomputer on earth..... 
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In spring 2013, Will Schmidt underwent a colonoscopy after blood tests showed he was suffering from severe anemia. Soon thereafter, the young father of three and +Jason's Deli employee received a stage 2 colon cancer diagnosis.

For Schmidt, the diagnosis wasn’t entirely surprising. He had a family history of colon and rectal cancers and had been skipping the colonoscopies his doctors had recommended.

Thanks to the colon cancer treatment he received at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Schmidt is now cancer-free. And, he’s working with Jason’s Deli to support MD Anderson’s efforts to end cancer: http://bit.ly/1lrkSNf #coloncancerawareness #crcsm #endcancer
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Genetic testing can help people with a family history of cancer to reduce their risks of develop certain cancer types, including breast, ovarian and colon. However, genetic testing is rarely simple.
Before undergoing genetic testing, whether it’s for the BRCA mutation or another type, patients should meet with a genetic counselor to discuss the implications and the next steps.

Learn more about what you should consider before undergoing genetic testing: http://bit.ly/1fWqf3y #genetictesting #cancer #breastcancer #ovariancancer #coloncancer #BRCA #endcancer
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How does what you eat affect your chances for cancer? Some new answers may be hidden in the millions of bacteria that live in your gut. These bacteria make up your gut microbiome. And, they’re vital to your health.

Learn to feed the good bacteria: http://bit.ly/1kikDkz #endcancer
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MD Anderson is using a new type of proton therapy to limit side effects while treating cancers of the pharynx and larynx, more commonly known as throat cancer. These types of human papillomavirus- (HPV) related head and neck cancers have increased dramatically in recent years. While they are highly treatable, patients sometimes experience side effects for decades after throat cancer treatment.
 
A new type of throat cancer treatment called Intensity-Modulated Proton Therapy (IMPT) limits those side effects and could change the standard of care for head and neck cancer, says Steven Frank, M.D., medical director of the Proton Therapy Center at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center.
 
LISTEN to Dr. Frank discuss using IMPT to treat throat cancer: http://bit.ly/1m7TFgv  #endcancer
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Is it safe to exercise during cancer treatment? The answer is different for each cancer patient. Exercise can help patients cope with mild side effects like fatigue. But it is possible for cancer patients to exercise too much during cancer treatment. Exercising can be scaled back to help patients going through chemotherapy or other types of cancer treatment.
 
“You must take it from the frame work, not from where you were, but from where you are right now,” says Carol Harrison, senior exercise physiology technologist at MD Anderson Cancer Center.  
 
Learn these tips to help cancer patients stay on track with their exercise programs: http://bit.ly/1fH5YLw #cancer #exercise #cancertreatment #endcancer
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I can speak on this personally- chemotherapy is exhausting! Sometimes even just walking from one room to the next requires a short rest break. Survivors, don't get discouraged! Take your rest break, take a nap, get plenty of fluids, and get back up.
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After Will Schmidt’s brother underwent rectal cancer treatment at age 21, Will underwent frequent colonoscopies for a few years. But, as he says, “Life got busy,” and he started skipping his colon cancer screening exams.

Then, last spring, Will received his own stage 2 colon cancer diagnosis. He underwent colon cancer surgery to have more than 40 lymph nodes removed at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center.

Today, Will, who’s now cancer-free, is working with his employer, +Jason's Deli, to support MD Anderson’s mission to end cancer. WATCH the VIDEO to learn more: http://bit.ly/1dKbUIG #coloncancerawareness #crcsm#endcancer
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Lymphedema, a collection of protein-rich lymphatic fluid, is a common cancer treatment side effect and most commonly affects patients’ arms or legs.  It is most common in women who have had surgery and radiation as a part of breast cancer treatment, or in patients who had a large number of lymph nodes removed.
 
While lymphedema is uncomfortable, there are ways cancer patients can cope. Learn 6 ways to cope with cancer-related lymphedema: http://bit.ly/1qZihed #lymphedema #cancer #cancertreatment #sideeffects #endcancer
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How much meat should you eat? Eating more than 18 oz. each week of red meat, like pork, lamb, deer and beef, can raise your risk for colon cancer.

Use our red meat guide to see what that looks like. And, learn to try healthier options, like chicken and fish. http://bit.ly/1g3yBaI #healthyeating #healthydiet #endcancer
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Contact Information
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1 877.632.6789
Story
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Making Cancer History®
Introduction

The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center is a leader in cancer care, cancer research and the fight to #endcancer. Appointments available: 1-877-632-6789.

Mission
The mission of MD Anderson is to eliminate cancer in Texas, the nation, and the world through outstanding programs that integrate patient care, research and prevention, and through education for undergraduate and graduate students, trainees, professionals, employees and the public.

Company Overview

The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston ranks as one of the world's most respected centers focused exclusively on cancer patient care, research, education and prevention.

U.S. News & World Report’s “Best Hospitals” survey ranked
MD Anderson as the top hospital in the nation for cancer care in 2013. MD Anderson has achieved this highest ranking 10 times in the past 12 years and has ranked as one of the top two hospitals for cancer care since the magazine began its annual survey in 1990.

Questions for MD Anderson? Call 1-877-632-6789 or email askmdanderson@mdanderson.org.