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Manhattan Institute
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Developing and disseminating new ideas that foster greater economic choice and individual responsibility
Developing and disseminating new ideas that foster greater economic choice and individual responsibility

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Residents of 180 New York City Housing Authority properties currently live in “food deserts." This means that for many of New York’s lowest-income residents, access to fresh food—something most New Yorkers take for granted—is a serious hurdle.

The key, argues MI's Howard Husock, is to encourage new retail-rental development on NYCHA properties.

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Today’s classrooms are footing the bill for yesterday’s teachers as pension debt crowds out spending on everything from textbooks to teacher salaries.

Find out more about how pension costs are crowding out education spending in your state:

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On November 8, Californians will vote on Prop. 61, a measure which aims to lower drug prices by restricting prices to that paid by the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs. A new paper from MI’s Paul Howard reveals that this proposition would not only fail to lower drug prices, but also hurt veterans, patients, and taxpayers.

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Twenty years ago, Bill Clinton signed landmark welfare legislation despite warnings from many critics that it would be an utter disaster that put children on the street. While the bill was initially declared a success, a new round of criticism emerged after the Great Recession, claiming that millions of people have plunged into poverty as a result of welfare reform.

A new report from the Manhattan Institute’s Scott Winship turns that idea on its head.

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The Clean Power Plan remains as controversial as ever as it awaits its legal fate.

A new report from the Manhattan Institute finds that the EPA’s analysis significantly overestimated the direct benefits of CO2 reductions and co-benefits of accompanying reductions in air-pollutant emissions and significantly underestimated costs of meeting future electricity demand.

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Deferred and non-prosecution agreements—settlements that allow businesses to avoid prosecution for alleged crimes by paying hefty fines and agreeing to changes in business practices—have become increasingly common in the last decade. Just last year, companies such as GM and Deutsche Bank paid more than $6 billion in fines under such agreements.

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Could local philanthropies be the key to saving struggling Rust Belt cities?

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Companies and researchers are making exceptional progress in the battle against cancer.

In this new report, MI Senior Fellow Paul Howard the case for a new social contract for oncology drug development and reimbursement. It is crucial that we accelerate the adoption of the right treatments to the right patients, while also experimenting with delivery-system reforms that may offer greater value to patients for every dollar spent on care.

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Progressives often claim that women earn 77 cents for every dollar that men earn. But this statistic looks only at raw averages and does not take into account factors such as education, skills, and hours worked.

After controlling for other factors, the gender pay gap practically disappears. Indeed, among single, childless workers under 30, women earn more than men. Legislation to close the gender “wage gap” is misguided: in reality, there is no gap to close.

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What options do policymakers have if they are worried about escalating OPEB costs?

In this new MI report, Amy Monahan explores the potential legal barriers to reform in 10 states across the country.
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