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Last year, Mackenzie Health Volunteer Association donated over 92,000 hrs and $165,000. #NationalVolunteerWeek Thank you to our #volunteers.
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Mackenzie Health

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Mackenzie Health is celebrating the contribution of its 900+ volunteers during National #Volunteer Week. Video: http://youtu.be/M-BRVVMhWCM
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Patient Access Week 2014: At Mackenzie Health, Patient Access registers approx. 204,000 accounts per year Patient Access Week 2014 at Mackenzie Health#PatientAccess
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Patient Access Week 2014 - Thanks to the Patient Access Team for the hard work and dedication to providing the best patient experience. Video: http://youtu.be/gfRL8Q73RHU #PatientAccessWeek
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Hypothyroidism

The Facts
The thyroid is a gland located in the neck below the Adam's apple. It helps control the body's metabolic rate by producing the hormones thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3). A metabolic rate is the rate of chemical processes occurring within the body that are necessary to maintain life.

Hypothyroidism is the most common of the thyroid disorders. It occurs when the thyroid gland becomes underactive and does not produce enough thyroid hormones. The metabolic rate falls and normal bodily functions slow down.

Hypothyroidism occurs in 1.5% to 2% of women and in 0.2% of men, and it is more common with increasing age. Up to 10% of women over the age of 65 show some signs of hypothyroidism.

Although less common, hypothyroidism does occur among the young. Neonatal hypothyroidism, called cretinism, is associated with mental retardation, jaundice (yellowing of skin), poor feeding, breathing difficulties, and growth problems. Childhood (juvenile) hypothyroidism is characterized by delayed growth and problems with mental development; however, with prompt treatment, problems can be minimized.

Causes
Primary hypothyroidism occurs when there is a problem with the thyroid gland itself. The most common cause of adult hypothyroidism is Hashimoto's thyroiditis. It's caused by an autoimmune process where the body produces antibodies that attack and gradually destroy the thyroid gland.

Women are eight times more likely than men to develop Hashimoto's thyroiditis, especially as they age. It can also run in families or be associated with syndromes of genetic abnormalities such as Turner's syndrome, Klinefelter's syndrome, and Down syndrome.

Hypothyroidism can also be caused by treatments for hyperthyroidism. To treat hyperthyroidism, the thyroid gland may be rendered inactive with medications or radioactive iodine treatment, or it may be surgically removed. The result may be a lack of thyroid hormones, causing hypothyroidism.

The thyroid gland requires iodine to function properly. A chronic lack of iodine means that less thyroid hormone can be produced and this causes the thyroid to enlarge. Since salt manufacturers now add iodine to salt, this form of hypothyroidism is extremely rare in North America. However, it is still the major cause of hypothyroidism in underdeveloped countries, where iodine is often lacking in the diet.

Some rare inherited disorders cause enzyme abnormalities in the thyroid gland that don't allow it to make the hormones. Secondary hypothyroidism (when there is a problem with the pituitary or hypothalamus, not the thyroid) may occur if the pituitary gland in the brain isn't working properly, and not producing a hormone (called thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH)) needed to stimulate the thyroid gland. These disorders are quite rare and not a major cause of hypothyroidism.

Some medications can cause a person to develop hypothyroidism by interfering with the production of the thyroid hormone. These include amiodarone* (a heart medication), lithium (a bipolar disorder medication), and interferon alpha (a cancer medication).

#Hypothyroidism

More info about this and other conditions at Mackenzie Health's Health Information Portal: http://qrs.ly/n43y0bo #ConditionFAQ
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Have them in circles
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Domestic Abuse and Sexual Assault Care Centre: Centre for care of victims and survivors of sexual assault and domestic abuse http://qrs.ly/pl3rfxk
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Patient Access Week: Patient Access schedules approximately 156,000 appointments a year at Mackenzie Health. #PatientAccessWeek
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Mackenzie Health

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#Bollywood Night 2014 is SOLD OUT! Thanks to everyone who is supporting this extraordinary event! Get ready to dance! http://qrs.ly/873z1ze
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#Crohn's Disease

The Facts
Crohn's disease is a chronic condition in which there is chronic inflammation in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract or "bowel." It is one type of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Another type of IBD is ulcerative colitis. While Crohn's disease can affect any part of the digestive system, it occurs more commonly in the ileum (part of the small intestine) and colon (large intestine).

Most cases of Crohn's disease are diagnosed before the age of 30, but it can affect people of any age group. Crohn's disease isn't usually fatal, but it can be a lifelong inconvenience. There is no definitive cure.

Causes
The exact cause of Crohn's disease is unclear, although there is clearly an autoimmune element. That means the body's natural defenses, which are normally supposed to fight infection, attack the body's own tissue and fail to distinguish the body itself from foreign material in the body. Autoimmune diseases run in families. About one-quarter of Crohn's patients have relatives who also suffer from IBD.

It is also believed that a virus or bacteria may be involved, which may cause the initial damage to the lining of the GI tract. However, it is not yet known which organism might be involved.

More info about this and other conditions at Mackenzie Health's Health Information Portal: http://qrs.ly/2r3yo4p #ConditionFAQ
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10 Trench Street, Richmond Hill, Ontario L4C 4Z3
Introduction
Mackenzie Health is a regional healthcare provider in Southwest York Region. It will include two hospitals (Mackenzie Richmond Hill Hospital and Mackenzie Vaughan Hospital) and a network of community based services

Full service Community hospital including Emergency, Acute inpatient, Complex Care, Rehabilitation, Diagnostic, Palliative, Ambulatory and Long Term Care services

Regional leadership in: Chronic Kidney Disease/Dialysis; Stroke Care; Domestic Abuse and Sexual Assault

Mackenzie Health Clinical Programs
  • Emergency and Medicine Program
  • Surgery Program
  • Women and Child Program
  • Diagnostics and Therapeutics Program
  • Chronic Disease and Seniors Health Program
We have 6 offsite locations in Richmond Hill, Vaughan and Barrie – providing:
Brain Injury Services, Behaviour Mgmt, Diabetes Education, Chronic Kidney Disease/Dialysis, Domestic Abuse and Sexual Assault (DASA) Care Centre of York Region, YCH Foundation, Health and Wellness, Preschool Autism Services, Rehabilitation, Sexuality Clinic
Contact Information
Contact info
Phone
(905) 883-1212
Address
10 Trench St. Richmond Hill, On. L4C 4Z3