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Lumosity

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Protect all aspects of your memory with these research-backed tips: 

1. Meditation for working memory. Meditation can help you hold more information in your working memory by improving your concentration.

2. Coffee for memory consolidation. New research shows that consuming caffeine after learning something new can improve your ability to remember it a day later. 

3. Berries for long-term memory. Flavonoids found in berries, especially blueberries, appear to strengthen existing connections in your brain, which can stave off age-related memory decline. 

4. Exercise for spatial memory. Physical exercise not only improves spatial memory, it can also improve many other cognitive abilities. 

5. Chewing gum for stronger memories. Preliminary studies show that chewing gum can improve performance on memory tests — possibly because it increases activity in the hippocampus. 

6. Sleep for memory consolidation. Sleep is where most of your memory consolidation takes place, and when you don’t get enough rest your long-term memory storage can suffer.

Would you try one of these tips to improve your memory? Share this post with others and let us know in th comments. 

Read more here: http://bit.ly/1m8MXH0
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Васил Профиров's profile photoJaskaran Panum's profile photoPaula Garcia's profile photoShawn Humes's profile photo
38 comments
 
Sometimes I can accept but in others side I refuse cause gum is make person memory run away so being too much concentrate on it...
Sent via my BlackBerry from Vodacom - let your email find you!
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Lumosity

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While playing make-believe may not seem as important as math or reading, it can play a surprisingly important role in kids’ cognitive development. Acting out stories that address possible scenarios and emotions from multiple perspectives can help children develop the concept of “theory of mind,” an awareness that other’s thoughts can differ from their own. The ability to see things from other points of view can also be the first step in self-regulating behavior like delaying gratification and reducing aggression. In addition, make-believe can enhance a young child’s cognitive flexibility, which research has shown can lead to increased creative thinking later in life. Do you remember playing make-believe as a child, or do you still indulge? Share this post with friends and let us know in the comments. 

Read more here: http://bit.ly/1eSCdLH
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Aa Bosaz's profile photoKarla Tamayo's profile photoMichael Beale's profile photoramon patiño's profile photo
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Cutie
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Lumosity

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While you may not remember what happens during your sleeping hours, your brain is hard at work cycling through the five stages of sleep. 

Stage 1: Your mental activity slows down to a state between wakefulness and sleep. This stage is so close to consciousness that most people woken out of it will claim they were never asleep. 

Stage 2: Your brain waves become much slower, though your brain periodically produces half second bursts of activity called “sleep spindles.” 

Stages 3 and 4: You fall into deep sleep, which is characterized by extremely slow brain waves called delta waves. This is also the time when you’re prone to nightmares, sleepwalking and sleep-talking. 

Stage 5: You transition to REM sleep, which is when you’ll experience the dreams you’re most likely to remember in the morning. Your brain is the most protective of this stage of sleep, paralyzing your limbs and even incorporating outside sounds (like alarms) into your dreams. Current research suggests that dreams are a reflection of the memories you consolidated during sleep stages 3 and 4. 

Are you surprised to learn how much activity goes on in your brain as you sleep? Share this post with friends and let us know what you think in the comments. 

Read more here: http://bit.ly/1qsLafU
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DAVID K's profile photoJoshua Schaafsma's profile photoMorgan D.'s profile photoKL VW's profile photo
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Not really. However, I am intrigued at the stage for sleep walking, etc...I did it all the time; even cooked!
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The brains of optimists and pessimists may be hardwired to view the world differently, according to new research from Michigan State University. Study participants were first given personality tests to determine if they were naturally inclined to be positive or negative in their daily lives. They were then shown images that depicted negative scenarios and asked to put a positive spin on them — for instance, a last minute escape from a car crash. Brain scans showed that not only did pessimistic brains work harder than optimistic brains to create positive outcomes, but attempting to think positively also increased the pessimists’ negative emotions. What do you think? Share this post with friends and let us know what you think in the comments.

Read more here: http://bit.ly/1mQA8DF
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Alex K's profile photoArthur Ashleigh's profile photoMarguerite Simmons's profile photoRio Gupta's profile photo
67 comments
 
It seems to me optimists are easier tar
gets for scam artists, and  we all know the world is full of them
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Do you have a wandering mind? If so, your brain may be wired in a way that helps you naturally cope with pain. In a recent study, participants who were able to let other thoughts bubble up despite being in pain performed better on cognitive tests than those who focused on the pain. Brain scans showed that mind-wanderers made more connections to a brain region that produces natural painkillers. This research suggests that mind-wanderers may be able to benefit especially well from non-prescription pain-control methods like yoga and meditation. Did this study change your opinion about your wandering mind? Share this post with friends and let us know in the comments. 

Read more here: http://n.pr/16WX0ZG
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Tiffany Nunez's profile photoAlex K's profile photoMalynn Barnett's profile photoEnchanted Spirit's profile photo
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Wanderer? ???
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Have them in circles
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Lumosity

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Caring for a pet may help teenagers turn into better adults, according to research from Tufts University. Researchers found that young adults with a strong attachment to a pet not only engaged in more pro-social activities, like helping friends and family or taking on leadership roles, but were also more confident and empathetic than those who didn’t care for a pet. And the more involved these teens were in the day-to-day care of the pet, the more pronounced the effects. Do you agree with this research based on experiences? Share this post with friends and let us know what you think in the comments. 

Read more here: http://bit.ly/1ifQTmy
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Reese Barker's profile photoAlison Buchanan's profile photoRio Gupta's profile photoNoah Gundotra's profile photo
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Yes!
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Lumosity

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Stare directly at the black cross in the center of this image. Within moments, the pink dots on the periphery will disappear, leaving just a grey square. How does this illusion work? Focusing on the black cross moves the dots to the periphery of your visual field -- they’re still there, but they don’t stimulate your neurons enough to perceive them. Were you able to make the pink dots disappear? Let us know in the comments and share this post with friends so they can try too.
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Lauren Nelson's profile photoRose Hannaquist's profile photoNahzere Smith's profile photodeepthi tr's profile photo
107 comments
 
So now  we know what our mind is doing while concentrating  singlepointedly  
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Drinking green tea could give your brain a powerful boost, according to a new study from the University of Basel. Participants drank either a plain soft drink or one spiked with green tea extract, then took a test of working memory. Not only did those in the green tea group perform better on the working memory test, but brain scans also showed increased connectivity between brain regions. According to the study’s researchers, these findings suggest that drinking green tea could improve brain plasticity and working memory — at least in the short term. Do you already drink green tea, or would you be willing to start after learning about the cognitive benefits? Share this post with friends and let us know in the comments. 

Read more here: http://bit.ly/1jouGnV
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Kali Wilcox's profile photoDAVID K's profile photoBrinaye Salaam's profile photoRhonda Evans's profile photo
52 comments
 
+Lizzie Chandler yes honey & green tea work well together. I tried the no caffeine as well but felt better when having it. Have you tried matcha green tea?
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Eating seven or more servings of vegetables a day could lower your risk of dying by an amazing 42%, according to a new study using over 65,000 participants. While a diet rich in fruits and vegetables protected against cancer and heart disease in particular, it lowered the risk of death from almost any cause, and at any age. While more vegetables gave participants more protection, even one serving (3 oz) of vegetables a day was associated with a 14% reduced risk of death. What’s your favorite way to add fruits and vegetables to your day? Share this post with friends and let us know in the comments. 

Read more here: http://cnn.it/1gPuIpi
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freeSpace sedoo's profile photoMarco Malighetti's profile photoG Martinez's profile photoKarla Tamayo's profile photo
44 comments
 
Well Heck Yeah! Everybody id going to die at some point in life! But at least lets all die HEALTHY!! :-)  I lOVE!LOVE!LOVE!! My fruits & my veggies all sorts & all kinds I don't know of a veggie that I dont like!
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Lumosity

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Do you love to read? Your brain reacts differently when you read for fun rather than read critically. Recent research from Stanford showed that reading casually activates your brain’s pleasure center. When reading critically to analyze and understand the text, your brain shows increased activity in the prefrontal cortex, the area of your brain responsible for executive functions. Because your prefrontal cortex also plays a role in working memory, decision making and attention, scientists propose that reading critically could positively impact these functions. Share this post with friends and let us know your favorite book to challenge yourself with in the comments.

Read more here:http://stanford.io/1oCox9I
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Rachael Joakim's profile photoMalynn Barnett's profile photoKarla Tamayo's profile photoMegan M's profile photo
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pity our eyes are ambidextrous, -- well, ambioptical. were they not, we could try reading with 'the bad eye' and get the other frontal, and occipital cortex to get off their backsides, and do some work!!
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Leading online brain exercise program that improves core cognitive abilities.
Introduction
Lumosity is the leading online brain exercise program that improves core cognitive abilities such as memory, attention and intelligence. Training with Lumosity enables users to remember more, think faster, and perform better at work, school and in everyday life. Launched in 2007, Lumosity now has more than 35 games, 20 million members, and paying subscribers from 180 countries. Lumosity’s exercises are based on the latest findings in neuroscience, with continuing independent third-party studies being conducted by researchers at Harvard, Stanford, UC Berkeley, and other academic institutions. Lumosity is available at Lumosity.com and on the iPhone. Lumosity is headquartered in San Francisco, California. For more information, please visit www.lumosity.com.