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Some people call the wall in the West Bank a ‘security fence’; others refer to it as an ‘apartheid wall’.
Some people call the wall in the West Bank a ‘security fence’; others refer to it as an ‘apartheid wall’. The International Court of Justice, in its 2004 advisory opinion declaring the construction illegal, called it simply ‘the wall’. Media style guides tend to suggest ‘West Bank barrier’ or ‘separation barrier/wall’. But the wall doesn’t […]
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Latest podcast: Ghaith Abdul-Ahad on the rise of the Houthis in Yemen.

Listen on YouTube, in iTunes or on our website: http://www.lrb.co.uk/v37/n10/ghaith-abdul-ahad/diary
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On the 67th anniversary of the establishment of Israel, Binyamin Netanyahu was sworn in as prime minister. It’s worth watching the first minute of his speech to the Knesset.

Click below to watch the video.
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Am I Napoleon? Mike Jay looks at a political history of madness.
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Inigo Thomas on the Lib Dem Lords Paradox:

There was no election for the House of Lords last week, obviously, so no surprise to wake up to on that front, but that doesn’t mean there’s no surprise at all.
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David Runciman on the UK Election:

It is finally time for Labour to abandon the idea that its primary purpose is to secure majorities in the House of Commons and that it should do nothing to put that prize at risk. It needs to become more like a typical European social democratic party, which recognises that nothing can be achieved without forging alliances with others.
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It needs to stop its belief that big government spreads wealth when in actual fact it gobbles up taxpayers money at a tremendous rate.
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Ross McKibbin: Labour dies again

As the pollsters retire to their attics to discover what went wrong, we can reflect on this historic election.
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How early was early photography?
How early was early photography? And how long did its earliness endure? The customary answer is just short of three decades, from about 1839 to 1865. The first date marks not the beginning of photographic experiments, but the year Louis Daguerre announced his ability to ‘seize the . . .
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Now with advancement in photography in many avatars we live more and more Virtual Reality.
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Glen Newey on the Prince of Wales's letters

Charles comes across in the memos as a well-meaning dunderhead, dabbling in affairs of state with the slightly bemused air of a prep-school geography teacher.
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In the new issue: Seymour Hersh on the Killing of Osama bin Laden; Andrew O‘Hagan on Saul Bellow, David Runciman's Notes on the Election; Sophie Pinkham on Sergei Dolatov, Anne Wagner on early photography, and more.
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Glen Newey on the UK Election:

Nothing in Ed Miliband’s election campaign became him like losing it. For all the garment-rending since Thursday, it was a good election for Labour to flunk.
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Seymour Hersh on The Killing of Osama bin Laden

The White House’s story might have been written by Lewis Carroll: would bin Laden, target of a massive international manhunt, really decide that a resort town forty miles from Islamabad would be the safest place to live and command al-Qaida’s operations? He was hiding in the open. So America said.
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Essays on politics, history, art, criticism, international affairs and escalators
Introduction
The London Review of Books publishes a dozen or so long essays and book reviews every fortnight (and a few shorter pieces, too). 

It was founded in 1979, during the year-long lock-out at the Times. For the first six months, it appeared as an insert inside the New York Review of Books. In May 1980, it became fully independent and over the years has published more than 12,000 articles by more than 2000 writers, all available to subscribers in an online archive.

Contributors include Tariq Ali, Perry Anderson, Neal Ascherson, John Ashbery, Julian Barnes, Alan Bennett, Angela Carter, Linda Colley, Jenny Diski, Terry Eagleton, William Empson, Anne Enright, Jorie Graham, Rosemary Hill, Christopher Hitchens, Frank Kermode, August Kleinzahler, John Lanchester, Hilary Mantel, James Meek, Toril Moi, Andrew O'Hagan, Jacqueline Rose, Lorna Sage, Edward Said, James Salter, Iain Sinclair, Colm Tóibín, Jenny Turner, Marina Warner, Raymond Williams, James Wood, Michael Wood and Slavoj Zizek.