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‘We have many stories about the New York School’s beginnings, and a few about its endings, but fewer still about what happened in the middle, those decades when you move through life preoccupied with the task to hand: what to paint, what to write, what to work on. And there is Grace Hartigan, stomping along.’
On a spring day in New York City in 1960, Grace Hartigan, then 38 years old, took the train uptown to visit Winston Price, a young scientist from Baltimore, and a new collector of her work. To anyone who saw her on the subway, she wouldn’t have looked like a painter; ‘when I go out,’ . . .
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My dear friend you so Nice i like you so much 
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Our latest issue features Colm Tóibín on the Easter Rising, Peter Pomerantsev on Alexander Litvinenko's murder, Terry Castle on Hillary Clinton and David Runciman on Tony Blair.
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Our latest issue features Hilary Mantel on Henry VIII's closest friend, Jeremy Harding on Angola and Mark Ford on Ted Hughes.
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There used to be people who would only take abstract art seriously if the artist could, like Picasso, ‘draw properly’ when they wanted to. The obverse still obtains in art criticism. Because Alexander Calder became an abstractionist his clowns, strongmen and the bouncing kangaroo have been let into ‘fine art’, but as they hop in over the inverted commas they still get sidelong looks.
Sculpture conventionally does one of two things; it either creates space by carving, or creates volume by modelling. Once the material has been cut back or built up, a statue, as the word implies, is static in its relationship to space. Moving sculpture occupies space in a variable way and . . .
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in the latest issue: Ed Miliband on inequality; Jonathan Meades on Albert Speer; Lana Spawls on what a junior doctor does; Joost Hiltermann on the Iran-Iraq War; Christopher Tayler on Jack Reacher, and more.
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The Obama administration at first said that the countries which denied passage to the Cubans were right to do so. But he hasn’t changed the wet foot, dry foot policy.
Thawing relations between the United States and Cuba have brought an upsurge in Cubans trying to leave the island. They’re worried they may lose their favourable US immigration status, becoming no more welcome than any other Latino who fancies life in the US. Since 1995, the ‘wet foot, dry foot’ policy has deterred people from […]
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Our new issue is now online, featuring John Lanchester on bitcoin, Perry Anderson on Brazil and Colin Burrow on Seamus Heaney’s translation of the Aeneid: http://www.lrb.co.uk/
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Love-impaled Sappho, help me in my discombobulation! Did you hear that? HILLARY CLINTON IS FLIRTING WITH ME! She’s got my hand and she is warming it up! Bejeezus! (It’s getting positively toasty!) Not only that – my god! She’s giving me the Look! (What look?) The Look You Can’t Mistake! The Nanosecond Too Long Look! The Look you get when someone shows you her trowel for the first time! The Look you get when contemplating the Mysteries of Rosicrucianism! The Look that goes with – has ever gone with – the wordless poetical language of Secret Handshakes!
So Blakey, Bev and I are among the lucky ticket-holders to a big Silicon Valley campaign fundraiser for HRC. (Don’t ask, don’t tell.) Yes: Her Herness Herself! A friendly little plush-covered gathering for six hundred at some well-connected Palo Alto dweller’s farcically supersized . . .
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Emblazoned on the walls is Delacroix’s answer to his own great conundrum. ‘Oh! Young artist, you want a subject? Everything is a subject; the subject is yourself.’ A thought he symbolised in Christ on the Sea of Galilee, the exhibition’s most visionary image: the saviour-artist asleep in the storm-tossed boat amid its desperate rowers, dreaming up both them and the storm, himself their salvation.
A canvas begun in the autumn of 1848 and finished the following spring is, at four foot eight inches wide, one of the heftier items in Delacroix and the Rise of Modern Art, an exhibition at the National Gallery (until 22 May) in which paintings by Eugène Delacroix mingle with others by . . .
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Our new issue is now online, featuring Thomas Nagel on drones, Frances Stonor Saunders on borders and Andrew O'Hagan on Hollywood.
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Glen Newey on the Brexit campaign

Both Cameron and Johnson boast the full Eton-Oxford-Bullingdon CV. Also on Boris’s team is the tax-shielded Etonian plutocrat and Tory candidate for the London mayoralty, Zac Goldsmith. Last week even the Etonian Prince William was at it, nudging Britons away from Brexit. Maybe there’ll be an intervention from the Etonian Archbishop of Canterbury, giving Jesus’s line on qualified majority voting.
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Media coverage of the recent violence in Cologne is perpetuating sexism and racism in the name of feminism.
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Essays on politics, history, art, criticism, international affairs and escalators
Introduction
The London Review of Books publishes a dozen or so long essays and book reviews every fortnight (and a few shorter pieces, too). 

It was founded in 1979, during the year-long lock-out at the Times. For the first six months, it appeared as an insert inside the New York Review of Books. In May 1980, it became fully independent and over the years has published more than 12,000 articles by more than 2000 writers, all available to subscribers in an online archive.

Contributors include Tariq Ali, Perry Anderson, Neal Ascherson, John Ashbery, Julian Barnes, Alan Bennett, Angela Carter, Linda Colley, Jenny Diski, Terry Eagleton, William Empson, Anne Enright, Jorie Graham, Rosemary Hill, Christopher Hitchens, Frank Kermode, August Kleinzahler, John Lanchester, Hilary Mantel, James Meek, Toril Moi, Andrew O'Hagan, Jacqueline Rose, Lorna Sage, Edward Said, James Salter, Iain Sinclair, Colm Tóibín, Jenny Turner, Marina Warner, Raymond Williams, James Wood, Michael Wood and Slavoj Zizek.
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