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London Review of Books (LRB)
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In the latest issue: John Lanchester on Elon Musk, Frederic Jameson on time travel, T.J. Clark on Frank Auerbach's London, Jacqueline Rose on 'Gone Girl' and 'The Girl on the Train', Gary Indiana on the Tsarnaev brothers, Joanna Biggs on Elena Ferrante and more.
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In 1983, we published an essay by Oliver Sacks with the title 'The man who mistook his wife for a hat.' Here it is:
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What happens within a Hepworth carving is always as important as what occurs around it.

Anne Wagner on Barbara Hepworth
I wish someone would explain why yet another major Tate Britain exhibition has come under critical fire. The latest round of brickbats started flying a good six months before Barbara Hepworth: Sculpture for a Modern World was installed (until 25 October). Jonathan Jones already felt . . .
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Ravilious’s watercolours are so cleverly executed and reproduce with such finish that you have to get up close to see how they are done. His later drawings (as he called them) do things that shouldn’t be possible.

Alice Spawls at Dulwich Picture Gallery
There are so many problems with watercolour. A mistake ruins everything: you can try to blot it out but the stain remains; you can rub it out but the paper bobbles and disintegrates. You have to choose the right paper to start with: cold pressed paper has bumps and grooves to hold the . . .
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PODCAST: Julian Barnes on Van Gogh

Julian Barnes reads his review of Van Gogh's letters
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On the Saudi-led airstrikes in Yemen

‘They say in the media they targeted a military camp. But what happened is that they have killed our children.’
Abdullah al-Ibbi is a barber in the city of Sa‘dah, a Houthi stronghold in northern Yemen. He lost two wives, ten sons, 17 daughters and daughters-in-law, and eight grandchildren, including a six-month-old baby, in a Saudi-led airstrike on 5 May. In the qat fields of al-Sabr valley, a few kilometres from Sa‘dah, at least 30 […]
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An elderly couple have been murdered in their home in Palagonia. The crime was probably gruesome enough to have made headlines for its sensation value alone, but it’s still in the news because the suspect, an Ivorian national, arrived in Sicily by boat on 8 June.
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Patrick Sykes in Rawabi:

At a cost of $1.2 billion, Rawabi will be Palestine’s largest ever private sector project, and its first planned city.
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Councillors in seaside towns are considering using drones to kill seagull chicks in their nests.
Northumbria police have launched an investigation after a photo was posted on Facebook of a man apparently strangling a seagull. Councillors in seaside towns are considering using drones to kill seagull chicks in their nests. Although the numbers of most gull species in the UK are in decline, they have an ‘increasing presence in urban […]
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Luke Shore on the UN's new Sustainable Development Goals 

The UN hailed the agreement as bold and groundbreaking but in private, G77 ministers were furious, describing the proceedings as ‘bullying’, ‘blackmail’ and ‘a new wave of colonialism under UN auspices’.
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Currency in China is not unlike housing, fermented pu-erh tea (which can lose 85 per cent of its value in a bad year) or the Shanghai Stock Exchange Composite Index: all are prey to bouts of irrational exuberance and high levels of volatility.

Tomas Casas on the devaluation of the renminbi
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A new book subcategory in WHSmith?
Am I the last person to have noticed this subcategory in WHSmith bookshops? There must be people who head straight for it to grab the latest Cathy Glass, but it had passed me by, or I’d passed it by, until this weekend. I puzzled for a while over the upside-down face – I think it’s […]
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By the way, from the photograph that illustrates this post I see a Morrissey picture on the cover of what I believe is his autobiography, and it reminds lines from one of his songs: "How sad are we, and how sad have we been/ We' ll let you know, we'll let you know/ Oh but only if you're REALLY INTERESTED". My point is that you do not need to read a book to learn about tragedy in this world. It is quite easy to meet every day. The whole thing is as ridiculous as morbid.
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Have them in circles
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Essays on politics, history, art, criticism, international affairs and escalators
Introduction
The London Review of Books publishes a dozen or so long essays and book reviews every fortnight (and a few shorter pieces, too). 

It was founded in 1979, during the year-long lock-out at the Times. For the first six months, it appeared as an insert inside the New York Review of Books. In May 1980, it became fully independent and over the years has published more than 12,000 articles by more than 2000 writers, all available to subscribers in an online archive.

Contributors include Tariq Ali, Perry Anderson, Neal Ascherson, John Ashbery, Julian Barnes, Alan Bennett, Angela Carter, Linda Colley, Jenny Diski, Terry Eagleton, William Empson, Anne Enright, Jorie Graham, Rosemary Hill, Christopher Hitchens, Frank Kermode, August Kleinzahler, John Lanchester, Hilary Mantel, James Meek, Toril Moi, Andrew O'Hagan, Jacqueline Rose, Lorna Sage, Edward Said, James Salter, Iain Sinclair, Colm Tóibín, Jenny Turner, Marina Warner, Raymond Williams, James Wood, Michael Wood and Slavoj Zizek.