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London Review of Books (LRB)
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Essays on politics, history, art, criticism, international affairs and escalators
Essays on politics, history, art, criticism, international affairs and escalators

2,050 followers
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London Review of Books (LRB)'s posts

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‘We have many stories about the New York School’s beginnings, and a few about its endings, but fewer still about what happened in the middle, those decades when you move through life preoccupied with the task to hand: what to paint, what to write, what to work on. And there is Grace Hartigan, stomping along.’

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Our new issue is now online, featuring John Lanchester on bitcoin, Perry Anderson on Brazil and Colin Burrow on Seamus Heaney’s translation of the Aeneid: http://www.lrb.co.uk/

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Love-impaled Sappho, help me in my discombobulation! Did you hear that? HILLARY CLINTON IS FLIRTING WITH ME! She’s got my hand and she is warming it up! Bejeezus! (It’s getting positively toasty!) Not only that – my god! She’s giving me the Look! (What look?) The Look You Can’t Mistake! The Nanosecond Too Long Look! The Look you get when someone shows you her trowel for the first time! The Look you get when contemplating the Mysteries of Rosicrucianism! The Look that goes with – has ever gone with – the wordless poetical language of Secret Handshakes!

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Our latest issue features Colm Tóibín on the Easter Rising, Peter Pomerantsev on Alexander Litvinenko's murder, Terry Castle on Hillary Clinton and David Runciman on Tony Blair.

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Emblazoned on the walls is Delacroix’s answer to his own great conundrum. ‘Oh! Young artist, you want a subject? Everything is a subject; the subject is yourself.’ A thought he symbolised in Christ on the Sea of Galilee, the exhibition’s most visionary image: the saviour-artist asleep in the storm-tossed boat amid its desperate rowers, dreaming up both them and the storm, himself their salvation.

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Our latest issue features Hilary Mantel on Henry VIII's closest friend, Jeremy Harding on Angola and Mark Ford on Ted Hughes.

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There used to be people who would only take abstract art seriously if the artist could, like Picasso, ‘draw properly’ when they wanted to. The obverse still obtains in art criticism. Because Alexander Calder became an abstractionist his clowns, strongmen and the bouncing kangaroo have been let into ‘fine art’, but as they hop in over the inverted commas they still get sidelong looks.

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Our new issue is now online, featuring Thomas Nagel on drones, Frances Stonor Saunders on borders and Andrew O'Hagan on Hollywood.

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Glen Newey on the Brexit campaign

Both Cameron and Johnson boast the full Eton-Oxford-Bullingdon CV. Also on Boris’s team is the tax-shielded Etonian plutocrat and Tory candidate for the London mayoralty, Zac Goldsmith. Last week even the Etonian Prince William was at it, nudging Britons away from Brexit. Maybe there’ll be an intervention from the Etonian Archbishop of Canterbury, giving Jesus’s line on qualified majority voting.

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in the latest issue: Ed Miliband on inequality; Jonathan Meades on Albert Speer; Lana Spawls on what a junior doctor does; Joost Hiltermann on the Iran-Iraq War; Christopher Tayler on Jack Reacher, and more.
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