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New Tonight's Sky! Summer skywatching is on the way.
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od but now I know the resemblance of Hercules and svastika
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Shock Collision Inside Black Hole Jet

Latest News: This time-lapse movie of an extragalactic jet was assembled from 20 years of Hubble Space Telescope observations of the core of the elliptical galaxy NGC 3862. The blowtorch of ejected plasma is powered by energy from a supermassive black hole at the center of the galaxy.

http://hubblesite.org/newscenter/archive/releases/2015/19

#Hubble25   #Space   #Astronomy   #BlackHoles   #ScienceEveryday   #Science   #STEM  
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Latest News: Astronomers using NASA's Hubble Space Telescope have uncovered surprising new clues about a hefty, rapidly aging star whose behavior has never been seen before in our Milky Way galaxy. In fact, the star is so weird that astronomers have nicknamed it "Nasty 1," a play on its catalog name of NaSt1. The star may represent a brief transitory stage in the evolution of extremely massive stars. 
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its entrance point for new place
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Using NASA's +Hubble Space Telescope  astronomers have captured for the first time snapshots of fledgling white dwarf stars beginning their slow-paced, 40-million-year migration from the crowded center of an ancient star cluster to the less populated suburbs.

White dwarfs are the burned-out relics of stars that rapidly lose mass, cool down, and shut off their nuclear furnaces. As these glowing carcasses age and shed weight, their orbits begin to expand outward from the star cluster's packed downtown. This migration is caused by a gravitational tussle among stars inside the cluster. Globular star clusters sort out stars according to their mass, governed by a gravitational billiard-ball game where lower mass stars rob momentum from more massive stars. The result is that heavier stars slow down and sink to the cluster’s core, while lighter stars pick up speed and move across the cluster to the edge. This process is known as "mass segregation." Until these Hubble observations, astronomers had never definitively seen the dynamical conveyor belt in action.

Astronomers used Hubble to watch the white-dwarf exodus in the globular star cluster 47 Tucanae, a dense swarm of hundreds of thousands of stars in our Milky Way galaxy. The cluster resides 16,700 light-years away in the southern constellation Tucana.

Please join your hosts +Tony Darnell Dr.+Carol Christian and +Scott Lewis as they explore this amazing migration of white dwarfs in ancient star clusters.

#Science   #ScienceEveryday   #Space   #Hubble25   #Cosmology   #Astronomy   #Spitzer   #Keck   #STEM  
This Hangout On Air is hosted by Hubble Space Telescope. The live video broadcast will begin soon.
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White Dwarf Migration in Ancient Star Clusters
Thu, May 21, 3:00 PM
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Using NASA's +Hubble Space Telescope  astronomers have captured for the first time snapshots of fledgling white dwarf stars beginning their slow-paced, 40-million-year migration from the crowded center of an ancient star cluster to the less populated suburbs.

White dwarfs are the burned-out relics of stars that rapidly lose mass, cool down, and shut off their nuclear furnaces. As these glowing carcasses age and shed weight, their orbits begin to expand outward from the star cluster's packed downtown. This migration is caused by a gravitational tussle among stars inside the cluster. Globular star clusters sort out stars according to their mass, governed by a gravitational billiard-ball game where lower mass stars rob momentum from more massive stars. The result is that heavier stars slow down and sink to the cluster’s core, while lighter stars pick up speed and move across the cluster to the edge. This process is known as "mass segregation." Until these Hubble observations, astronomers had never definitively seen the dynamical conveyor belt in action.

Astronomers used Hubble to watch the white-dwarf exodus in the globular star cluster 47 Tucanae, a dense swarm of hundreds of thousands of stars in our Milky Way galaxy. The cluster resides 16,700 light-years away in the southern constellation Tucana.

Please join your hosts +Tony Darnell Dr.+Carol Christian and +Scott Lewis as they explore this amazing migration of white dwarfs in ancient star clusters.

#Science   #ScienceEveryday   #Space   #Hubble25   #Cosmology   #Astronomy   #Spitzer   #Keck   #STEM  
This Hangout On Air is hosted by Hubble Space Telescope. The live video broadcast will begin soon.
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White Dwarf Migration in Ancient Star Clusters
Thu, May 21, 3:00 PM
Hangouts On Air - Broadcast for free

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Hubble Space Telescope

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Latest News: The heart of the giant globular star cluster 47 Tucanae reveals the glow of 200,000 stars. In this cluster, Hubble spied a parade of young white dwarfs starting their 40-million-year migration away from the core. In globular clusters, lower mass stars rob momentum from more massive stars. Heavier stars sink to the cluster’s core as their orbits slow, while lighter stars pick up speed and move across the cluster to the edge.

http://hubblesite.org/newscenter/archive/releases/2015/16/

Find wallpaper of today's image here: http://hubblesite.org/gallery/wallpaper/pr2015016b/

Find it in our Printshop: http://hubblesite.org/gallery/printshop/ps59/
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Fantastic image!!
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Families in the Baltimore area -- Join us at the Space Telescope Science Institute in Baltimore, Md., for the Youth for Astronomy and Engineering STEMfest, a full day of science and engineering exhibits, hands-on activities, and interactive presentations celebrating the 25th anniversary of the Hubble Space Telescope. Events include guest speakers, food vendors and face painting and will take place from 10 a.m.-4 p.m. June 6 at the Space Telescope Science Institute
3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, Md. http://www.stsci.edu/institute/conference/youthae
Youth for Astronomy and Engineering recurring conference
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fentastic in increasing life
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Hubble Space Telescope

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Observations over the past 20 years reveal high-energy collisions inside the black hole jet in NGC 3862! While it has been known that the jets from black holes are extremely energetic, shooting out particles at about 98% the speed of light, astronomers were "shocked" to see collisions occuring inside the jets themselves.

This week, join +Tony Darnell, Dr. +Carol Christian and +Scott Lewis as they host the #HubbleHangout , discussing the science behind this discovery with the astronomers that used the +Hubble Space Telescope to make the observations. 

You can interact with the team by commenting below or using the Q&A app in Google+ or YouTube. Also Tweet us your comments and questions at @HubbleTelescope using the hash tag #HubbleHangout  and it might get answered on air.

Learn more about the news here: http://hubblesite.org/newscenter/archive/releases/2015/19

#Science   #Space   #Astronomy   #BlackHoles   #Hubble25   #Hubble  
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Shock Collision Inside Black Hole Jet - #HubbleHangout
Today, May 28, 3:00 PM
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سلام
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Hubble Space Telescope

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Latest News: This time-lapse movie of an extragalactic jet was assembled from 20 years of Hubble Space Telescope observations of the core of the elliptical galaxy NGC 3862. The blowtorch of ejected plasma is powered by energy from a supermassive black hole at the center of the galaxy.

http://hubblesite.org/newscenter/archive/releases/2015/19
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Wow! The secrets and untold wonders of this universe.

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Using NASA's +Hubble Space Telescope  astronomers have captured for the first time snapshots of fledgling white dwarf stars beginning their slow-paced, 40-million-year migration from the crowded center of an ancient star cluster to the less populated suburbs.

White dwarfs are the burned-out relics of stars that rapidly lose mass, cool down, and shut off their nuclear furnaces. As these glowing carcasses age and shed weight, their orbits begin to expand outward from the star cluster's packed downtown. This migration is caused by a gravitational tussle among stars inside the cluster. Globular star clusters sort out stars according to their mass, governed by a gravitational billiard-ball game where lower mass stars rob momentum from more massive stars. The result is that heavier stars slow down and sink to the cluster’s core, while lighter stars pick up speed and move across the cluster to the edge. This process is known as "mass segregation." Until these Hubble observations, astronomers had never definitively seen the dynamical conveyor belt in action.

Astronomers used Hubble to watch the white-dwarf exodus in the globular star cluster 47 Tucanae, a dense swarm of hundreds of thousands of stars in our Milky Way galaxy. The cluster resides 16,700 light-years away in the southern constellation Tucana.

Please join your hosts +Tony Darnell Dr.+Carol Christian and +Scott Lewis as they explore this amazing migration of white dwarfs in ancient star clusters.

#Science   #ScienceEveryday   #Space   #Hubble25   #Cosmology   #Astronomy   #Spitzer   #Keck   #STEM  
This Hangout On Air is hosted by Hubble Space Telescope. The live video broadcast will begin soon.
Q&A
Preview
Live
White Dwarf Migration in Ancient Star Clusters
Thu, May 21, 3:00 PM
Hangouts On Air - Broadcast for free

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Oh that Nell DeGrass Tyson and his/your "Keep Looking Up"
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Using NASA's +Hubble Space Telescope  astronomers have captured for the first time snapshots of fledgling white dwarf stars beginning their slow-paced, 40-million-year migration from the crowded center of an ancient star cluster to the less populated suburbs.

White dwarfs are the burned-out relics of stars that rapidly lose mass, cool down, and shut off their nuclear furnaces. As these glowing carcasses age and shed weight, their orbits begin to expand outward from the star cluster's packed downtown. This migration is caused by a gravitational tussle among stars inside the cluster. Globular star clusters sort out stars according to their mass, governed by a gravitational billiard-ball game where lower mass stars rob momentum from more massive stars. The result is that heavier stars slow down and sink to the cluster’s core, while lighter stars pick up speed and move across the cluster to the edge. This process is known as "mass segregation." Until these Hubble observations, astronomers had never definitively seen the dynamical conveyor belt in action.

Astronomers used Hubble to watch the white-dwarf exodus in the globular star cluster 47 Tucanae, a dense swarm of hundreds of thousands of stars in our Milky Way galaxy. The cluster resides 16,700 light-years away in the southern constellation Tucana.

Please join your hosts +Tony Darnell Dr.+Carol Christian and +Scott Lewis as they explore this amazing migration of white dwarfs in ancient star clusters.

#Science   #ScienceEveryday   #Space   #Hubble25   #Cosmology   #Astronomy   #Spitzer   #Keck   #STEM  
This Hangout On Air is hosted by Hubble Space Telescope. The live video broadcast will begin soon.
Q&A
Preview
Live
White Dwarf Migration in Ancient Star Clusters
Thu, May 21, 3:00 PM
Hangouts On Air - Broadcast for free

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Hubble Space Telescope

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Using NASA's +Hubble Space Telescope, astronomers have captured for the first time snapshots of fledgling white dwarf stars beginning their slow-paced, 40-million-year migration from the crowded center of an ancient star cluster to the less populated suburbs.

White dwarfs are the burned-out relics of stars that rapidly lose mass, cool down, and shut off their nuclear furnaces. As these glowing carcasses age and shed weight, their orbits begin to expand outward from the star cluster's packed downtown. This migration is caused by a gravitational tussle among stars inside the cluster. Globular star clusters sort out stars according to their mass, governed by a gravitational billiard-ball game where lower mass stars rob momentum from more massive stars. The result is that heavier stars slow down and sink to the cluster’s core, while lighter stars pick up speed and move across the cluster to the edge. This process is known as "mass segregation." Until these Hubble observations, astronomers had never definitively seen the dynamical conveyor belt in action.

Astronomers used Hubble to watch the white-dwarf exodus in the globular star cluster 47 Tucanae, a dense swarm of hundreds of thousands of stars in our Milky Way galaxy. The cluster resides 16,700 light-years away in the southern constellation Tucana.

Please join your hosts +Tony Darnell, Dr.+Carol Christian, and +Scott Lewis as they explore this amazing migration of white dwarfs in ancient star clusters.

#Science   #ScienceEveryday   #Space   #Hubble25   #Cosmology   #Astronomy   #Spitzer   #Keck   #STEM  
This Hangout On Air is hosted by Hubble Space Telescope. The live video broadcast will begin soon.
Q&A
Preview
Live
White Dwarf Migration in Ancient Star Clusters
Thu, May 21, 3:00 PM
Hangouts On Air - Broadcast for free

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+Ahmed Sharaf wala shi
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Join Hubble's journey of cosmic discovery.
Introduction

HubbleSite.org is the online home of NASA's Hubble Space Telescope. HubbleSite is produced by the Space Telescope Science Institute in Baltimore, MD, which conducts Hubble's science mission.

Nearly 400 years after Galileo first observed the heavens through a telescope, we continue to seek answers to age-old questions about the universe. And while the technology has evolved over the centuries, the inquiry remains essentially the same: What's out there, where did it come from, and what does it mean?

At the Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI), we're working hard to study and explain the once-unimaginable celestial phenomena now made visible by the Hubble Space Telescope's cutting-edge technology.

HubbleSite is produced by the Space Telescope Science Institute's Office of Public Outreach.