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Hubble Space Telescope

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NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope has arguably been the quintessential symbol of scientific achievement for decades. But that notoriety has parlayed into a unique position in pop culture. Hubble, and the images of the universe it produces, has not only helped astronomers rewrite textbooks but also has permeated areas traditionally isolated from science. In this episode of the Hubble at 25 and Beyond series, we take a look at some examples of how Hubble has indeed become a household name all over the world.
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+Julie Ritt Edwin Hubble/ Red Shift/universe expansion? That's without looking it up :)
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Hubble is more than a science spacecraft; it’s a cultural phenomenon! Think about where you’ve seen images of the Hubble Space Telescope or Hubble images in your daily life … a textbook, mural, clothing. Snap a photo and share with us!

https://www.nasa.gov/spothubble
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Sexfriend
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Latest News: The possibility of life on other worlds has fueled humankind's imagination for centuries. Over the past 20 years, the explosion of discoveries of planets orbiting other stars has sparked the search for worlds like Earth that could sustain life. Most of those candidates were found with other telescopes, including NASA's Kepler space observatory. NASA's Hubble Space Telescope has also made some unique contributions to the planet hunt. Astronomers used Hubble, for example, to make the first measurements of the atmospheric composition of extrasolar planets.

Now, astronomers have used Hubble to conduct the first search for atmospheres around temperate, Earth-sized planets beyond our solar system, uncovering clues that increase the chances of habitability on two exoplanets. They discovered that the exoplanets TRAPPIST-1b and TRAPPIST-1c, approximately 40 light-years away, are unlikely to have puffy, hydrogen-dominated atmospheres usually found on gaseous worlds. Those dense atmospheres act like a greenhouse, smothering any potential life. Observations from NASA's upcoming James Webb Space Telescope will help determine the full composition of these atmospheres and hunt for potential biosignatures, such as carbon dioxide and ozone, and methane.

http://hubblesite.org/newscenter/archive/releases/2016/27/full
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Salam
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A team of astronomers has directly imaged the first planet ever found in a wide orbit inside a triple-star system. The orbit of such a planet had been expected to be unstable, probably resulting in the planet being quickly ejected from the system. But somehow this one survives.

The artist's impression shows a view of the HD 131399 system from the perspective of the giant planet, HD 131399Ab (lower left), orbiting in the system. The planet is about 16 million years old, making it one of the youngest exoplanets discovered to date – and one of just a handful of “directly imaged” planets. It is also one of the coldest and least massive exoplanets that have been directly imaged.

http://hubblesite.org/newscenter/archive/releases/2016/31
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Vat Samaun's profile photoMouloud Kechidi's profile photoMikey Moo's profile photo
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Do they make it up its a dot on a telescope they know sod all realy
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Congratulations, Juno!
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Iam happy for these news . At last the secrets of giant Jupiter will be unlock .
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Hubble Space Telescope

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WorldWide Telescope (WWT) is free, open-source astronomy
visualization software. Its well-designed interface and diverse modes of exploration make it a user-friendly and awe-inspiring public portal to the cosmos. Teachers and students use WWT for both expert-led and self-driven astronomical lessons/journeys. In addition, WWT's robust web resource connections and data tools make it a valuable professional astronomy research environment. In January 2016, the American Astronomical Society became the institutional home of this "Universe Information System" with plans to integrate the tool into research journals and encourage its use in education and public outreach.

In July's Public Lecture Series, Dr. Frank Summers of the Space Telescope Science Institute will describe and demo some of the myriad ways this software enables virtual and visual explorations of the universe. Visit http://hubblesite.org/about_us/public_talks/ for links to both live and previous lectures, or join us in the Space Telescope Science Institute auditorium, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, Md., 21218. The Public Lecture Series occurs on the first Tuesday of every month. Admission is free and free parking is available in the lot across the street.

Watch live on Youtube:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zTC084dm-Lo
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Let's start off the July 4 holiday weekend with some more cosmic fireworks. Enjoy our fly-through visualization of star cluster Westerlund 2, now in ultra high-def.
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Isn't this amazing 
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It is the 50th anniversary of Star Trek and Hubble has been in orbit doing incredible science for more than half of that time. Read more about the connections between #‎Hubble and #‎StarTrek in this #‎FrontierFields post by Dr. Frank Summers
https://frontierfields.org/2016/07/21/the-final-frontier-of-the-universe
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Have a nice afternoon 
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Celebrating its 50th anniversary this year, the TV series "Star Trek" has captured the public's imagination with the signature phrase, "To boldly go where no one has gone before." The Hubble Space Telescope simply orbits Earth and doesn't "boldly go" deep into space. But it looks deeper into the universe than ever before possible to explore the fabric of time and space and find the farthest objects ever seen. This is epitomized in this Hubble image that is part of its Frontier Fields program to probe the far universe. This view of a massive cluster of galaxies unveils a very cluttered-looking universe filled with galaxies near and far. Some are distorted like a funhouse mirror through a warping-of-space phenomenon first predicted by Einstein a century ago.

http://hbbl.us/4PFq
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Wow ! 
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In the Baltimore area? Join us this weekend at Artscape! Visit the Space Telescope Science Institute at the Pinkard Gallery for a display of museum-style images of Hubble’s greatest hits, our ViewSpace video exhibit on astronomical discoveries, an interactive touchscreen featuring visualizations of cosmic events, volunteers in clean room “bunny suits” discussing the science and engineering of space telescopes, and more. We’ll be sharing info on Hubble as well as the upcoming James Webb Space Telescope and Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST). Be sure to bring young astronomy fans to Kidscape Academy at the Corpus Christi Church lot on July 15 and 16, where we’ll be doing light and color activities and demonstrating an infrared camera. Light and color activities are from noon-8 p.m. July 15 only. Infrared camera demonstrations are at noon, 2, 4 and 6 p.m. July 15, and noon and 3 p.m. July 16.

http://www.artscape.org/home
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Peering deep into the core of the Crab Nebula, this close-up image reveals the beating heart of one of the most historic and intensively studied remnants of a supernova, an exploding star. The inner region sends out clock-like pulses of radiation and tsunamis of charged particles embedded in magnetic fields.

The neutron star at the very center of the Crab Nebula has about the same mass as the sun but compressed into an incredibly dense sphere that is only a few miles across. Spinning 30 times a second, the neutron star shoots out detectable beams of energy that make it look like it's pulsating.

The NASA Hubble Space Telescope snapshot is centered on the region around the neutron star (the rightmost of the two bright stars near the center of this image) and the expanding, tattered, filamentary debris surrounding it. Hubble's sharp view captures the intricate details of glowing gas, shown in red, that forms a swirling medley of cavities and filaments. Inside this shell is a ghostly blue glow that is radiation given off by electrons spiraling at nearly the speed of light in the powerful magnetic field around the crushed stellar core.

Bright wisps are moving outward from the neutron star at half the speed of light to form an expanding ring. It is thought that these wisps originate from a shock wave that turns the high-speed wind from the neutron star into extremely energetic particles.

http://hubblesite.org/newscenter/archive/releases/2016/26/
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itambi asoh's profile photosanusi muhammad's profile photoNath Abban's profile photokarin bär's profile photo
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Beeindruckendes Foto 
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Hubble Space Telescope

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WorldWide Telescope (WWT) is free, open-source astronomy visualization software. Its well-designed interface and diverse modes of exploration make it a user-friendly and awe-inspiring public portal to the cosmos. Teachers and students use WWT for both expert-led and self-driven astronomical lessons / journeys. In addition, WWT's robust web resource connections and data tools make it a valuable professional astronomy research environment. In January 2016, the American Astronomical Society became the institutional home of this "Universe Information System" with plans to integrate the tool into research journals and encourage its use in education and public outreach. Dr. Summers will describe and demo some of the myriad ways this software enables virtual and visual explorations of the universe.

Host: Dr. Frank Summers

For more information: http://hubblesite.org/about_us/public_talks/

#HubblePublicLecture #Astronomy
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سلام
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Join Hubble's journey of cosmic discovery.
Introduction

HubbleSite.org is the online home of NASA's Hubble Space Telescope. HubbleSite is produced by the Space Telescope Science Institute in Baltimore, MD, which conducts Hubble's science mission.

Nearly 400 years after Galileo first observed the heavens through a telescope, we continue to seek answers to age-old questions about the universe. And while the technology has evolved over the centuries, the inquiry remains essentially the same: What's out there, where did it come from, and what does it mean?

At the Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI), we're working hard to study and explain the once-unimaginable celestial phenomena now made visible by the Hubble Space Telescope's cutting-edge technology.

HubbleSite is produced by the Space Telescope Science Institute's Office of Public Outreach.