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Within a decade, 70% of the ground-based astronomical infrastructure of the world will be on Chilean soil. Join speaker Mia Bovill of the Space Telescope Science Institute for an overview of the telescopes and the astronomy being done in Chile and an introduction to the long, skinny country with the best skies on the planet. 

Join us online or in-person for our Public Lecture Series, which occurs on the first Tuesday of every month. Visit http://hubblesite.org/about_us/public_talks/ for links to both live and previous lectures, or join us in the Space Telescope Science Institute auditorium, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, Md., 21218. Admission is free and free parking is available in the lot across the street.
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Who doesn t love science i do
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Fill your computer with some of Hubble's finest images. The Hubble Heritage project is dedicated to finding Hubble's most stunning pictures, and now you can download the entire collection from 1998-2015.  http://hubblesite.org/gallery/album/heritage/
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+Tþherese Stamoulis 
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Hubble Space Telescope

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Latest News: First discovered in the 1960s, the comet-shaped “Smith Cloud” -- depicted in this artist's illustration -- is 11,000 light-years long and 2,500 light-years across. The cloud, which is invisible at optical wavelengths, is plummeting toward our galaxy at nearly 700,000 miles per hour.

Astronomers long thought that the Smith Cloud might be a failed, starless galaxy, or gas falling into the Milky Way from intergalactic space. If either of these scenarios proved true, the cloud would contain mainly hydrogen and helium, not the heavier elements made by stars.

Hubble was used to measure the chemical composition and found heavier elements that could only come from stars. The cloud appears to have been ejected from within the Milky Way and is now boomeranging back. It will plow back into the Milky Way's disk in about 30 million years. When it does, astronomers believe it will ignite a spectacular burst of star formation, perhaps providing enough gas to make 2 million suns.

Though this settles the mystery of the Smith Cloud's origin, it raises new questions: How did the cloud get to where it is now? What calamitous event could have catapulted it from the Milky Way's disk, and how did it remain intact? The answers may be found in future research.

http://hubblesite.org/newscenter/archive/releases/2016/04
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So this is clear The ufo are come from
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Hubble Space Telescope

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A discussion of a new study about high velocity clouds around the Milky Way Galaxy that were jettisoned and are falling back in.

Join your faithful hosts Dr.+Carol Christian, +Tony Darnell and +Scott Lewis as they have a conversation with the scientists involved with the study.

Your questions and comments are encouraged! You can communicate with the team in the comments below, in the live chat on YouTube and on Twitter using the hash tag #HubbleHangout  

Further details on this study with images available at http://hubblesite.org/newscenter/archive/releases/2016/04
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What observations will you need to determine the internal 
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Supermassive black holes are enormous black holes with sizes hundreds of thousands to billions of solar masses. They reside in the centers of galaxies - some are more active than others, and many are gigantic masses more hidden. 

Join the discussion of these objects, how they are found and what they mean for galaxy formation and evolution. 

Your hosts, as always, are Dr.+Carol Christian+Scott Lewis, and +Tony Darnell who will be speaking with scientists who use the +Hubble Space Telescope and other instruments to study Supermassive Black Holes. 

#HubbleHangout 
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The James Webb Space Telescope (sometimes called JWST or Webb) will be a large infrared telescope with a 6.5-meter primary mirror. The telescope will be launched on an Ariane 5 rocket from French Guiana in October of 2018. Join JWST scientists and engineers in a Hangout to find out the latest status, challenges of engineering and the exciting science to be done with this amazing telescope.

Join Dr. +Carol Christian +Tony Darnell and +Scott Lewis as they talk with members of the +James Webb Space Telescope (JWST)  on the current status of Webb and the completion of affixing the final mirror!

You'll be able to live-chat on the YouTube page when we're live and we will be live-tweeting the event on Twitter using the hash tag #HubbleHangout.
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Today on the Frontier Fields blog: How astronomers knew a supernova was on the way: http://frontierfields.org/2016/01/29/predicted-reappearance-of-supernova-refsdal-confirmed/
Hubble has captured an image of the first-ever predicted supernova explosion. In November 2014, Hubble’s Frontier Fields program caught sight of a supernova called “Refsdal” while examining the MAC...
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Interesting fairytale , indeed,.
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Hubble Space Telescope

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Within a decade, 70% of the ground based astronomical infrastructure of the world will be on Chilean soil. These major observing facilities include the 4 meter telescopes of CTIO and La Silla, the four 8 meter mirrors of the VLT, the 66 dishes of ALMA, and the upcoming 30 meter EELT. Join us
for an overview of the telescopes and the astronomy being done on Chilean soil and an introduction to the long skinny country with the best skies on the planet.

#HubblePublicLecture #Astronomy
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Muchas gracias. Tu
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Join Hubble's journey of cosmic discovery.
Introduction

HubbleSite.org is the online home of NASA's Hubble Space Telescope. HubbleSite is produced by the Space Telescope Science Institute in Baltimore, MD, which conducts Hubble's science mission.

Nearly 400 years after Galileo first observed the heavens through a telescope, we continue to seek answers to age-old questions about the universe. And while the technology has evolved over the centuries, the inquiry remains essentially the same: What's out there, where did it come from, and what does it mean?

At the Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI), we're working hard to study and explain the once-unimaginable celestial phenomena now made visible by the Hubble Space Telescope's cutting-edge technology.

HubbleSite is produced by the Space Telescope Science Institute's Office of Public Outreach.