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Hubble Space Telescope
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Join Hubble's journey of cosmic discovery.
Join Hubble's journey of cosmic discovery.

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Can you believe that Hubble has been in space for 28 years? To celebrate, we’re releasing this stunning view of the Lagoon Nebula, also known as M8. At the center of the photo, a monster young star 200,000 times brighter than our Sun is blasting powerful ultraviolet radiation and hurricane-like stellar winds, carving out a landscape of ridges, cavities, and mountains of gas and dust. This region epitomizes a typical, raucous stellar nursery full of creation and destruction.

This view highlights glowing oxygen gas (blue), hydrogen (green) and nitrogen (red). For more information and some Hubble trivia, visit http://hubblesite.org/news_release/news/2018-21
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Messier 96, a spiral galaxy, resembles a giant maelstrom of glowing gas, rippled with dark dust that swirls inward toward the nucleus.

M96 was discovered in 1781 by Charles Messier’s colleague Pierre Méchain. Although it is located 35 million light-years from Earth in the constellation Leo, you can observe it easily using a medium-sized telescope this month. https://go.nasa.gov/2oTTNrM #NotaComet #HubbleMessierObjects #AstronomyHistory
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#TBT 20 years ago, Hubble celebrated its eighth year of exploration and new near-infrared camera with this vividly colorized image of Saturn. Each color corresponds to features of the clouds and hazes in the planet’s atmosphere. Learn more: http://bit.ly/2oXDhbj #HubbleHistory
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You knew Hubble does astronomy, but did you know it also does trigonometry? Hubble has measured the distance to a globular star cluster for the first time, using stellar parallax. It found that the cluster NGC 6397 is 7,800 light-years away, with just a 3 percent margin of error.
A distance is only a number — but a significant number. This new, refined distance measurement provides an independent estimate for the age of the universe. It will also help astronomers improve models of stellar evolution. Learn how:
http://hubblesite.org/news_release/news/2018-24
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Hubble has set a new distance record by spotting the farthest individual star ever seen! Light from this star took 9 billion years to reach Earth. Normally it would be much too faint to view, but thanks to a phenomenon called gravitational lensing, the star’s light was magnified enough for Hubble to detect.
The discovery team dubbed the star “Icarus,” after the Greek mythological character who flew too near the Sun on wings of feathers and wax that melted. Much like Icarus, the star had only fleeting glory as seen from Earth: It momentarily skyrocketed to 2,000 times its true brightness when temporarily magnified. Learn more: http://hubblesite.org/news_release/news/2018-13
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At first glance, the asteroid trails that streak this Hubble photo seem as mundane as fireflies on a summer night. But a closer look at this image reveals the true immensity of the universe. Prepare to have your mind blown in the latest post on our Illuminated Universe blog, “Snapshot of a Compulsive Universe.” https://bit.ly/2FWdomu
Snapshot of a Compulsive Universe
Snapshot of a Compulsive Universe
illuminateduniverse.org
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The ghostly galaxy NGC 1052-DF2 is an oddball. Unlike every other galaxy, it appears to completely lack the mysterious substance known as dark matter. The gravity of dark matter helps galaxies to form and survive, so the discovery of NGC 1052-DF2 suggests that there is more than one way to form a galaxy. Read more: http://hubblesite.org/news_release/news/2018-16
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When it comes to supernovas, one size doesn’t fit all. Astronomers have identified a handful of so-called Fast-Evolving Luminous Transients (FELTs) over the past decade. These events last for a short time compared to a typical exploding star. New research suggests that a FELT is a new type of supernova that gets a brief turbo boost in brightness from its surroundings. Read more: http://hubblesite.org/news_release/news/2018-18
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On the outskirts of our galaxy, a cosmic tug-of-war is unfolding and only Hubble can see who's winning. The players are two dwarf galaxies, the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds, both of which orbit our own Milky Way galaxy. But as they go around the Milky Way, they are also orbiting each other. Each one tugs at the other, and one of them has pulled out a huge cloud of gas from its companion. That cloud of gas is being devoured by the Milky Way and feeding new star birth in our galaxy.
But which dwarf galaxy is doing the pulling, and whose gas is now being feasted upon? After years of debate, scientists now have the answer: http://hubblesite.org/news_release/news/2018-15
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Astronomers have found a galactic case of arrested development. The galaxy, NGC 1277, churned out stars prodigiously until 10 billion years ago, when star formation abruptly ended. Now it appears “red and dead,” a relic of the universe’s distant past. Read more: http://hubblesite.org/news_release/news/2018-17
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