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Introduction
The Google Cultural Institute helps preserve and promote culture online
With a team of dedicated engineers, Google is building tools that make it simple to tell the stories of our diverse cultural heritage and make them accessible worldwide. 

Explore the Cultural Institute site
We have created this site to provide a visually rich and interactive online experience for telling cultural stories in new ways. Discover exhibits by expert curators, find artifacts, view photographs, read original manuscripts, watch videos, and more.

Other Projects
We have worked with organizations from across the globe on a variety of projects; presenting thousands of works of art online through the Art Project, bringing to life the wonders of the world through the World Wonders Project and showcasing the Dead Sea Scrolls.

H
ere you will find all sorts of interesting information about culture and history:
*News and features announcements
* Tips and tricks about Google Cultural Institute’s exhibits and features
* Spotlights on cultural themes and personalities on the site
* Stories behind historic and cultural events and people
* Hangouts about all sorts of cultural topics
* #CITrivia, a chance for you to show off your knowledge in culture and history

Given the volume of feedback we receive here, we may not be able to respond individually to every comment and we're not able to provide product support (if you're having product issues, please visit our Help Center). Rest assured we're paying attention, and we're always eager to hear from you.

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The children’s classic Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland has just turned 150 years old, and has been in print ever since its first publication in 1865 by Charles Dodgson, under the pen name Lewis Carroll.  Since then the book has taken tens of millions of readers down the rabbit hole in more than 35 languages.

It's sophisticated illustrations are as iconic as Carroll's story https://goo.gl/TlnQtN The artist who created them, Sir John Tenniel, was famous in the Victorian era as a political cartoonist for Punch magazine.  Despite the success of the novel and its sequel Through the Looking Glass and What Alice Found There (1872), Tenniel refused the author's later requests to illustrate his stories.

The +The Morgan Library & Museum in New York has recently opened a comprehensive exhibit showcasing 150 years of Wonderland and its influence on children's literature and world culture. http://goo.gl/2wFWkf    #aliceinwonderland #LewisCarroll   #Alice150   #WonderlandNYC  
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Favourite book ever!
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To kick off July, we’re happy to announce the launch of more than 90 collections from cultural organizations in 30 countries. Discover thousands of new objects and documents, and explore new online exhibitions and Museum View tours from Brazil to Belgium: http://goo.gl/TvjPbB

See what's beneath the streets and buildings of a modern metropolis in +Archäologisches Museum Hamburg's new exhibit: https://goo.gl/mIIINX  Over in the Netherlands, the +Naturalis Biodiversity Center one of the world's greatest natural history collections, opens the doors to its incredible storage tower for the preservation of specimens in Leiden: https://goo.gl/nlcxBm 

Take a ride through cycling history in the +Canada Science and Technology Museum   exhibition:  https://goo.gl/mIIINX  And, discover the history of Buddhist Tibetan music in a fascinating exhibit from the +Tibetan Buddhist Resource Center (TBRC) on how monks transcribe sacred sounds in mesmerizing musical notation https://goo.gl/8wqCbs

These are just few highlights, and we’ll be sharing more throughout July.  
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Good 1
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Helen Keller, the blind and deaf American woman who became an accomplished writer, humanitarian, and social activist was born on June 27, 1880.  The earliest example of her writing can be seen in this letter https://goo.gl/SJGWtV, written in block-style script on June 17, 1887 when she was just seven years old.   The original is kept in the Samuel P. Hayes Research Library, Perkins School for the Blind in Massachusetts.
The Google Cultural Institute brings together millions of artifacts from multiple partners, with the stories that bring them to life, in a virtual museum.
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Henry VIII was crowned King of England on this day in 1509. This is one of the most well-known portraits of the famously tall monarch, who stood 1.9 meters (6 feet 2 inches): https://goo.gl/Zr1zDY It came from the workshop of the German painter Hans Holbein the Younger, who spent much of his career painting portraits for the English court.  Henry VIII actually commissioned this full-length portrait and a matching one of his third wife Jane Seymour to decorate a wall in Whitehall Palace. This surviving portrait, painted on a wood panel is actually a copy likely to have been painted in same period (ca.1537-47). In 2003 it was painstakingly restored by the conservators at the +Walker Art Gallery, National Museums Liverpool http://goo.gl/bKYXOs
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isto é super e muito bom mesmo obrigada 
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A selection of four unique katabira (帷子) from the Edo period to celebrate the first day of summer in the northern hemisphere. These unlined kimono garments were an elegant way to keep cool in 18th-century Japan.
From the collection of the Nara Prefectural Museum, on view at: https://goo.gl/b8ZvQY
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The Holland Festival has just launched the exciting online project; The Book of Sand, a digital, interactive song cycle by Dutch composer and director Michel van der Aa which is available for free as a website and app in the Apple Store.

Website: http://thebookofsand.net/
Apple Store: https://itunes.apple.com/WebObjects/MZStore.woa/wa/viewSoftware?id=1000159198

Inspired by the fantastical stories of Jorge Luis Borges, Van der Aa puts you in a space where all places in the world exist simultaneously. Three parallel film layers reveal alternative points of view and introduce new elements to the story, which allows you to choose a new route through the narrative at any point. A young woman (played by the Australian singer-songwriter Kate Miller-Heidke) collects up sand which is being moved between the film layers by a mysterious machine.
With The Book of Sand composer Michel van der Aa has invented a completely new genre: the digital, interactive song cycle. Created in partnership with the Holland Festival, Sydney Festival, Google Cultural Institute, BBC The Space and other partners, and created exclusively in digital format, The Book of Sand was launched on 31st May as a website and smartphone app.
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The Battle of Gettysburg  https://goo.gl/EL2VPW ended on this day in 1863. Union and Confederate forces fought from July 1–3 in the town of Gettysburg, Pennsylvania. It caused 51,000 casualties - the most of the entire war, and was a major turning point in the war. The battle and its grim aftermath led to the creation of Soldiers’ National Cemetery. Historian Matthew Pinsker discusses the historic site and Lincoln’s famous dedication speech, the Gettysburg Address, delivered four months later https://goo.gl/TwI4cr   #CivilWar   #Gettysburgbattle   #Gettysburg  
The final stop of a teacher's tour of Gettysburg finds Dickinson College historian Matthew Pinsker at Soldiers' National Cemetery, where on November 19, 1863, Abraham Lincoln delivered the Gettysburg Address. These ten sentences of "prose poetry," Pinsker notes, have defined for generations of Americans the meaning and lessons of the battle.
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Beautiful. Craves 
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On June 28, 1919, the Treaty of Versailles was signed in France, ending World War I. French Prime Minister Georges Clemenceau chose the glittering Hall of Mirrors to sign the treaty that ended the First World War. This was surely a symbolic choice given that 48 years earlier it was the French who were conceding victory to the Germans at the end of the Franco-Prussian war. Take a closer look at the images below to compare how the hall looked on the day the Treaty was signed, and how it looks today. https://goo.gl/pvarPn  #wwi   #Versailles  +Château de Versailles 
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Marie Skłodowska Curie announced her discovery of radium to the world on this day in 1903. She and her husband Pierre were awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics a few months later. She established a research center which investigated how radium could be used to cure cancer.   Sadly, her exposure to radiation in the lab (by carrying test tubes in her lab coat) is linked with an illness that caused her premature death at the age of 67. 
“I am among those who think that science has great beauty.”
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Alan M. Turing (1912-1954) - the renowned mathematician, and pioneering computer science genius who cracked the German Enigma code during WWII, was born on this day in 1912.  He spent many hours in this office in WWII Codebreaking Hut 8 at Bletchley Park, England. 
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The legendary Hollywood film director, producer and screenwriter Billy Wilder was born on this day in 1906.  Wilder directed many of the most iconic films of Hollywood's Golden Age including Double Indemnity (1944), The Lost Weekend (1945), Sunset Boulevard (1950), Some Like It Hot (1959), and The Apartment (1960), for which won the Academy Awards for best producer, director and screenwriter.  He was the first person to achieve this honor. 
Director Billy Wilder in his Hollywood office.
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Today marks the bi-centenary of Napoleon's defeat at Waterloo.
Led by the Duke of Wellington and Gebhard von Blücher, 100,000 British, Dutch, and Prussian troops finally defeated the French emperor and his troops after 23 years of warfare.
Virtual reality was in order for the artist behind this monumental depiction of a British regiment at Waterloo - over 7 feet wide - which now hangs in the +National Gallery of Victoria. To get a sense of the actual battlefield, Elizabeth Thompson managed to get the British Army to re-enact the regiment's 300-man battle formation, complete with firing off live rounds of ammunition. #Waterloo  
While disapproving of war, Elizabeth Thompson (later Lady Butler) respected deeply the heroism of the individual soldier. Writing in her diary on 9 May 1866, she observed: ‘My own reading of war – that mysteriously inevitable recurrence throughout the sorrowful history of our world – is that it calls forth the noblest and the basest impulses of human nature’. The meticulous accuracy she brought to her depictions of the Napoleonic, Afghan and Boer...
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