The #golang sessions at Google I/O 2012 have been announced.

"Go concurrency patterns" by +Rob Pike
https://developers.google.com/events/io/sessions/gooio2012/322/

"Go in production," a panel hosted by +Andrew Gerrand
https://developers.google.com/events/io/sessions/gooio2012/320/

"Meet the Go team" a fireside chat with the core Go team
https://developers.google.com/events/io/sessions/gooio2012/321/

"Computing Map tiles with Go on App Engine" by +Chris Broadfoot and +Andrew Gerrand
https://developers.google.com/events/io/sessions/gooio2012/902/
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Jose Luis Vazquez's profile photoSean Russell's profile photoChangju An's profile photo
4 comments
 
What type of development GO programming language support?
 
From the perspective of a casual Go programmer:

Go is a mostly procedural language with a little functional programming mixed in.  It provides statically compiled executables with good cross-compiling support for the three OSes (I regularly develop on OSX and cross-compile to produce executables for Linux and Windows -- true WORA).  You can not yet target Android (easily) or iOS (at all?).  It has excellent actor-based concurrency support; if you know Erlang, you'll feel right at home.

It is strongest in web services, systems programming and (surprisingly, for me) re-usable tooling -- things I'd have turned to Ruby for in the past -- but it can be used to write any sort of application.  It has a robust 3rd-party library corpus, and the core library is an amazing example of an API that provides most of what you'll ever need for most jobs without being a bloated maze of packages.

It is currently weakest in GUI app development and it needs some attention to performance tuning.
 
Hi^^ Sean. Nice to meet you. Thank you for your request. Thank you for your advice.
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