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Gizmag is now New Atlas, follow our new G+ page...
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Intracranial pressure could be key to tackling astronaut vision loss
The intracranial pressures recorded during the flights were then compared to measurements taken while the volunteers were either sitting, lying facing upward and lying with their heads tilted downwards here on the ground. It was discovered that, during periods of weightlessness, the intracranial pressure of the volunteers remained steady at a level slightly below that which would be expected of an individual who had assumed the supine position on Earth.
http://newatlas.com/astronaut-vision-intracranial-pressure/47448/
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Can technology deliver sustainability?
Over time, technological progress results in products that use less energy, are more compact and use up fewer raw materials. Does this add up to enough resource savings to make life on Earth more sustainable? A new study from MIT has examined modern technology through the lens of a 150-year-old economic theory of efficiency and resource consumption – and in almost all cases, the benefits of reducing required resources is cancelled out by the increase in consumer demand for them.
http://newatlas.com/technology-dematerialization-sustainability-mit/47479/
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Revved-up carbon purifies radioactive water
After the Fukushima nuclear plant accident occurred, hundreds of millions of gallons of radioactive water was left over. That water is still being stored, as no one knows quite what to do with it. Scientists from Texas' Rice University and Russia's Kazan Federal University, however, may have an answer. They've developed a type of carbon that can reportedly filter radionuclides from water.
http://newatlas.com/carbon-filter-radioactive-water/47477/
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Born in the USA: The best new architecture by American firms
The American Institute of Architects (AIA) has declared the winners of its 2017 Institute Honor Awards, which recognize excellence in architecture, interior architecture and urban design projects from firms licensed in the United States. The awards are a great opportunity to check out some top-tier architecture.
http://newatlas.com/2017-aia-institute-honor-awards/47434/
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VR "smell mask" lets you sniff things you may regret
For over a century creative entrepreneurs have been trying to find ways to incorporate scents and smells into multimedia experiences. In the early 20th century theatre owners experimented with spraying perfume into auditoriums at specific moments during films and by the early 1960s there were two competing smell technologies battling for audience's olfactory delight. Smell-O-Vision and AromaRama were not embraced by the general public. Unsurprisingly, people seemed to dislike having smells pumped into their faces while watching movies. OhRoma is the latest attempt to integrate smells into entertainment and like many new innovations, it's coming from the porn industry.
http://newatlas.com/ohroma-vr-smell-adult/47454/
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Morphing metamaterial models take origami to a whole new level
Metamaterials are an almost magical class of materials that can do things that seem impossible, but they can only perform one miracle at a time. Now Harvard researchers have come up with a toolkit for constructing metamaterials that flow from one shape and function into another, like origami.
http://newatlas.com/reconfigurable-metamaterials-harvard/47503/
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Scientists unleash graphene’s innate superconductivity
Already renowned for its potential to revolutionize everything from light bulbs and dental fillings through to semiconductors and motorcycle helmets, graphene can now add innate superconductivity to its repertoire. Scientists at the University of Cambridge claim to have discovered a method to trigger the superconducting properties of graphene without actually altering its chemical structure.
http://newatlas.com/graphene-pwave-superconductor-cambridge/47500/
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Do electric cars really harm the environment less than gasoline-powered cars?
Electric vehicles are often touted as a more environmentally friendly than cars powered by gasoline. But all that electricity has to be produced somewhere, so it got us to wondering if EVs really are better for our planet than traditional vehicles.
http://newatlas.com/obi-electric-cars/47489/
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Royal Navy gets new eyes in the skies
When the United Kingdom's Queen Elizabeth class carriers go into service in 2020, they'll be watched over by a new generation of eyes in the sky. In an announcement by the Minister for Defence Procurement, Harriett Baldwin MP, Lockheed Martin UK was awarded a £269 million (US $331 million) contract to develop and manufacture the Crowsnest Airborne Surveillance System to alert the carrier groups against incoming missile and other airborne threats.
http://newatlas.com/royal-navy-carriers-crowsnest/47475/
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Don't like blood? Neither does this potentially life-saving titanium
When a medical implant such as a stent or catheter is rejected by the body, blood platelets adhere to the device, forming a clot that encapsulates it. Those clots can in turn lead to heart attacks, embolisms or infections. One solution is to put patients on blood-thinning medications for the rest of their lives. Engineers at Colorado State University, however, have developed an alternative – blood-repellent titanium that could be used to build the implants.
http://newatlas.com/blood-repellent-titanium/47472/
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NASA confirms 2016 was the hottest year on record
Another year, another broken temperature record. As early data predicted, NASA and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) have now reported that globally, 2016 was the warmest year since records began in 1880. That puts us on a streak of three years in a row that have surpassed previous records, painting a worrying picture of a long-term warming trend.
http://newatlas.com/2016-hottest-year-record-nasa-noaa/47455/
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