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Designed for Photographers, Fine Artists, Illustrators, Graphic Artists, Digital Artists and the like who want to learn GIMP and Inkscape software along with online portfolio solutions. This DVD Cours...
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at first i was like: $120!?!?...
Then I realised it was 5h long...
 
Still $120 is a lot how about more like $60 lol.
 
remember that it is both GIMP and Inkscape combined, that is why i priced it the way i did.
 
+Kam-Hung Soh Would it be better to say "(as opposed to raster)," rather than bitmap? (not being a definition nazi, just for personal curiosity/understanding :)
 
I don't really understand what the differences maybe I'll give it a try.
 
+Kam-Hung Soh Well there you have it! I wasn't aware of the interchangeability. Been at a magazine with heavy Ph, Il & Id use, so bitmat is only used for specific file type.

I have learned new something today! I get leave early!
 
+Matthew Garbett SAT style-
Gimp : Photoshop :: Inkscape : Illustrator
("Gimp is to Photoshop as Inkscape is to Illustrator.")
 
Inkscape would be the equivalent of Adobe Illustrator. I love Inkscape for layout of a poster, card or complex drawing. Inkscape and GIMP together are outstanding!
 
wow, we both commented at the same time, weird. :)
 
Did I mention that this DVD is free for schools who make it a part of their curriculum? Just contact me with the details. I would love to see GIMP and Inkscape in schools around the world.
 
Hey GIMP! Can u answer this bc I look up gimp download all the time but idk which one to get. I want a free or trial version to draw but all the numbers confuse me. So can u give me a link to it?
 
I'm useing a windows 7 laptop
 
yupp i did :) thanks for the links too :)
 
+Steve Starr
Well MOST of the things in inkscape SVGs are viable in other programs, but there are special things like Fussiness and masks that are not SVG standardised.

Inkcape supports a superset of SVG features, that are AFAIK unique to Inkscape.
 
… on the other hand I am rather sure, that there aren't a lot of people, who begin to edit the Bezier-splines in the text editor.
Maybe some simple filters are tweakable, and the colors, fonts and text elements, but 90% of the people who can edit SVG all by themselves also can decode QR codes by lookng at them (and they can do so faster than Chuck Norris).
 
+Steve Czajka Your job in all honor, but I think with the price you will not get much of your DVD in circulation. For 120 CDN or even 90 EUR I get several of books or DVDs on the subject and can still Donate 50EUR to GIMP or Inkscape.
 
Hi Ludwig, thanks for your comment. Here in Canada I can pay over $60 for a Photoshop and Illustrator DVD each, so I figure this is a competitive cost. And with the $2000 you save on purchasing those packages, send that donation to the fine people at GIMP and Inkscape, or go out and purchase a high end camera and PC for yourself. :)

This is not a commercial venture for me. I did this as a compendium for a live course that I am teaching for my non-profit arts guild. I don't have money to advertise this so i am expecting modest sales at best. In fact I am humbled by the amount of activity on this post. I just hope to cover my costs. If i do cover my costs, i am considering a "pay what you want model (minus shipping and materials)". I agree with you that there are several great books out there, but I learn best from video tutorials (personal preference). Cheers!
 
If anyone has better suggestions for distribution (online rather than snail mail), let me know. I would be able to cut the costs significantly if to a wider audience. I would like to get to a “pay what you want” model. The total package is roughly 2.5GB.
 
+Steve Czajka You could talk to the Humble Bundle guys, They have this product called "the Humble Store", it is used by WolFire Games, and FrostByte to name a few...

Other then that I can not think of any other good pay distribution systems.
 
Gustav and Steve Starr: Thanks! I like these ideas very much. Are there any companies that I could simply hand the content over to, they look after distribution and i get a small royalty? In that way i could cut the cost significantly. I also don’t want to get into the business of cutting DVDs, packaging, shipping etc... I never expected this amount of feedback and website visits.
 
+Steve Czajka

Alternative way of sharing (for free) would be use of DropBox public folder. Firstly, you register to Dropbox and get 2GB of free space. Then invite two other friends to Dropbox, you get 500MB for each — this totals 3GB of free space (I heard it's ~2,5 GB. If it's under, you might pass with inviting only one friend, but nothing will hurt if you have 3GB). Now, put everything into .zip archive, copy public link to the folder and send the mail with the link to the schools that require it. Only people with the link will be able to download it (which is a weak point if the link leaks outside of school). However, I have not read terms and conditions of Dropbox thoroughly, so I am not aware of any caps (consult with it for more info). The other alternative is google docs, where you (have 5 GB of free storage) have to limit viewers to collaborators, add schools as collaborators and set permission to view&download only. Bad side of it is that schools will most probably have to create a gmail account. And I'm not aware of any traffic restrictions there either.
 
+Žiga Pirih
But there is still the e-commerce stuff to think about...
:-/
and I would not trust DropBox for shit.
 
I am thinking of something similar for schools (only). Since I am offering this free for schools I am considering posting inside of YouTube as private, and authorizing only schools to gain access to the account.
 
+Steve Czajka ...that would require approximately same actions as Google Drive option — except you'll have to do that on every single video. Also, if you do it this way, you'll have a problem. If video on Youtube is private, only certain people can view it. That means every school would need to have at least one youtube account (because I doubt you'll add every student to that list), and... Well, that wouldn't work. Account hijacking is only one of major reasons why schools don't play this way. Except if a teacher were to download the videos from youtube, that would work, but note that it's far more likely that you'll find a student with a browser extension that would do this job, as teachers generally don't know anything about computers. (And student downloading stuff means greater chances for piracy than teacher downloading stuff). Google Drive and Youtube are both owned by google, so whatever you choose... shit won't be much different.

+Gustav Hartvigsson With latest TOS changes, you raise a valid point about dropbox. (Although I think they have explained that nothing is much different than before... but still.)

+Ward aka WardsParadox lol, in the times where 25 DVD drives (without the box) costs you 9€... and cheapest 4GB USB = 7,25€. (And regardless of actual cost where you are, I bet you can find similar ratio everywhere.
 
+Ward aka WardsParadox Considering CD/DVD driver is part of standard equipment, your argument barely stands. And if school didn't set up a network in these times, then it most probably doesn't have computers that could run GIMP or Inkscape. Same would go for CD drives.


(Also, can't see if your DVDs are expensive... or USBs are cheap... Or if both.)
 
+Ward aka WardsParadox Well, 6-7 years old computer would be pretty much unable to run GIMP without crashing or severe lag... (Because I've seen 6-7 years old computers. And worked with them.)
 
+Steve Starr fine, but tablets would be completely useless (judging by Ubuntu 11.10). The sad truth is that most schools use Windows, and small minority has macs. Linux is generally to be found only on universities with computer-related programs.
 
+Ward aka WardsParadox i3 is not 6-7 years old thing. It's 2 years for 1st gen. 6-7 years old would be, for example, Pentium 4 (Single core @2.4GHz)+ 512 MB RAM. (My previous computer, 6-7 years old machine at school would be worse). Running GIMP on this configuration is next to impossible, whenever your brush is more than 15px across at spacing of 20 (%). Make it animated for extra lag.

And you can be sure that there is at least one computer on each school which has DVD drive.
And on the bottom line, it's their problem after all...
 
Digital Arts Course FREE for Schools - UPDATE May 13, 2012
Due to overwhelming demand, I am simply unable to provide the physical DVD to each and every school. As a result, I have evaluated a few alternate distribution options, and I have a potential solution for schools to consider. I have decided to use YouTube to distribute these videos completely for free to schools. Here is how it works:

Send me an email (steveczajka at hotmail dot com)
Subject line: Free Digital Arts Course for SCHOOLS
Attach: PDF scan of signed letter from your school administrator requesting access to the free digital arts course on YouTube, and that your school is seriously considering (or already has) implementing GIMP / Inkscape into the curriculum.
Provide: YouTube account name that your school will be using to view the videos.

If I get 50 letters from 50 schools, I will post all roughly 2.5 GB of videos onto YouTube, and unlock these videos to every school that has applied completely for free.

So the idea here is that I need teachers and school administrators to spread the word to a minimum of 50 schools. PLEASE do NOT send money, or donations! If you want to donate, please donate to www.GIMP.org or www.Inkscape.org to the people who create this software! Please note that I can not respond to all questions given the demand for this program. Thanks, Steve

http://steveczajka.posterous.com/digital-arts-course-dvd-gimp-inkscape
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