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Blender, our fellow project, made a new important release.
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GIMP's profile photoGabriel Hasbun's profile photoJoal Heagney's profile photoGnu Hacher's profile photo
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Is it finally easy to use by novices like GIMP is?
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Since v2.50 the UI is much, much nicer, and it keeps getting better.
 
Blender has gone a long, long way from what it used to be :)
Especially with the addition of that real time rendering "Cycles Render" engine.
And for the people who are used to Maya, there's a Maya preset for the shortcuts at startup.
 
I love GIMP. MyPaint + GIMP = Sweetness.
Now if only GIMP would stop asking us what our dimensions are every time we create a new layer....
 
GIMP is very easy to get started with if you have ever used Photoshop. If you have not it means that you are indeed a newbie. So yes at this point GIMP would not be very easy.
 
What often makes me worry about 'ease of use' is loss of usability for professional tasks. Every professional usage is by definition difficult, because of the extensive feature set the software has to have, and the complexity of the task. The change of user interface in Blender is a great example of how the two were combined. It not only became easier to use, it made it possible to extend and improve the professional use. Very few open source projects achieve that.
 
I'm happy for Blender, but when we can see a new Gimp release? ^^
 
the remesh modifier is way too awesome :D
 
Beautiful. Open Source software is heaven on your PC.
 
But let's not forget the GNU in "GNU Image Manipulation Program"! :)

To me, GIMP will always stand more for freedom and liberty than "open source." The term "open source" is a condescending euphemism for the word "free." It assumes that people are too dumb to make the distinction between gratis and freedom when they hear the word "free". We're all smart enough to know the difference.

Remember the day when Spencer and Peter met Richard Stallman at UC Berkeley. "They asked if they could change General [Image Manipulation Program] to GNU [Image Manipulation Program], and it was done." (GIMP FAQ)
 
I'm somewhat concerned that the current GIMP implementation using Layer Groups, while good, may be slipping behind the cutting edge, I.e. nodes.
It's at the point where I'd LOVE to see something like a single-layer high-colour version of GIMP so that GIMP's paint/select/path tools could be used within Blender's node editor. :/
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+Gnu Hacher We are not that much into "free vs open source" really :)
+Joal Heagney What's a "high-colour version"? How does it make GIMP's tools compatible with Blender tools?
 
Meh. Meant to say high-colour resolution - 16 bits, 32 bits per colour channel.
Just wishful thinking to have a smaller (and thus more easily maintained) version of Gimp which only worked on one layer (with the possibility of alpha and a mask).
Then you could use Blender's image node editor to do "layers" (and more) while using Gimp's tools to work on each single layer. (I'm sorry Blender guys, your paint tools still have a way's to go.)
Gimp is currently supported in Blender as an option to edit an image in an external editor. It just seems a bit silly now for Gimp to work on advanced layer options, when Blender has a working implementation that goes beyond that.
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+Joal Heagney Hmmm, how exactly do nodes replace groups of layers? Why would someone use nodes in Blender for grouping elements of e.g. web design? How does it possibly go beyond what GIMP already does and intends to do re layers via GEGL?
 
I see the major advantage of Nodes over Layers (even with Groups) as being able to create flexible, non-destructive workflows.

"How does it possibly go beyond what GIMP already does and intends to do?"

For a start, the same image can be used as an input for multiple nodes, and then recombined. Layer Groups are nice, but will still only allow for tree structures. This means that Gimp workflows will still have lots of layer copies, rather than non-destructive references to original images. Some examples of Node layouts can be seen here:
http://www.blender.org/development/release-logs/blender-242/blender-composite-nodes/

"Why would someone use nodes in Blender for grouping elements of e.g. web design?"

Blender now has a "Group" Node, that allows you to combine a node net into a single container, that can then be used as if it was a single node. Design a button (Or ruler/separator/etc.) image and separate text label images in the "SimpleGimp" app. Then feed the button into multiple Overlay Nodes, with each text label going to a different one of these Nodes. Group each text and Overlay node into Group Nodes. ("Enter Button", "Reset Button", etc.)
Bind the output of each "Button" Node into another Overlay Node (with offsets to handle layout), over the top of a Background Image.
If you want to change the style of the buttons, you only need to edit one Image. In a Gimp layout, you'd have to replace multiple copies of one layer.

To be able to do the same in Gimp, we'd need at least something like a "Reference" Layer (sends the image in one layer to other parts of the tree), which in my opinion, would still be an ugly way to achieve the same thing as a Node Editor.
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+Joal Heagney In other words, layers and nodes don't need to be mutually exclusive. Both have benefits.
 
"Are you familiar with ..." I am, but realistically that's several years in the future.
Currently what everyone is waiting for is high colour resolution - so we can finally shut those Photoshop Fanboys up. ;)
Don't get me wrong, I love GIMP, it's still faster than Krita on my laptop, but the instant it can support high-colour, I'm noding it up in Blender.
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