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Fred Hutch
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The mission of Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center is the elimination of cancer and related diseases as causes of human suffering and death.
The mission of Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center is the elimination of cancer and related diseases as causes of human suffering and death.

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Register now for Fred Hutch’s 2nd Symposium on Infectious Disease in the Immunocompromised Host, featuring internationally renowned scholars discussing a broad range of topics including vaccines, immunotherapy, fungal infections, the microbiome, respiratory viruses, and CMV. Travel stipends available to medical students, residents, fellows and especially trainees from diverse groups and communities. June 19-20 at Motif Seattle Hotel. Early Bird Registration Deadline: April 7. Travel Stipend Application Deadline: April 10.

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Fred Hutch physician-scientist Dr. Oliver “Ollie” Press was honored recently with a Gold Award for Achievement in Medical Research at Seattle Business Magazine’s 2017 Leaders in Health Care dinner gala.

“I’d like to thank my mentees,” Press said, pointing out a number of physician-scientists in the audience who had trained in his lab, including the Hutch’s Drs. Brian Till, Damian Green, Mazyar Shadman and Johnnie Orozco. “These people did all the hard work for which I’m getting credit tonight, and I’m very appreciative.”

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Dr. Jim Olson, a brain cancer researcher at Fred Hutch, sat down with CBS Sunday Morning's Jane Pauley to talk about his tumor paint research and Project Violet. To learn more about Olson and his research, visit www.projectviolet.org

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The International Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Foundation has awarded the 2017 iCMLf Prize to Fred Hutch leukemia researcher and diagnostic expert Dr. Jerald “Jerry” Radich in recognition of his “dedication to developing methods to increase access to molecular monitoring” of CML patients in emerging economic regions.

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New research has found that the most prevalent respiratory infection can be far worse than a stuffy nose for one sector of the population — bone marrow transplant patients.

These vulnerable patients, whose immune defenses have taken a dramatic double hit from both their original disease and the treatments required to repopulate their immune system with donor cells, are especially susceptible to a wide range of infections that typically don’t cause major problems in healthy people.

http://bit.ly/2lTYLkV

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Qing Feng, a graduate student in the joint University of Washington/Fred Hutch Molecular and Cellular Biology Graduate Program, is one of 13 recipients of the 2017 Harold M. Weintraub Graduate Student Award.
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