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Thought Transformation
A student wrote Lama Zopa Rinpoche:

You have asked me to read an article about how to transform depression into the path and also to concentrate on purification practices like confession to the 35 Buddhas. I did not faithfully do them everyday. However, I would like to thank you as you told me my depression and sufferings are a result of purification, of me trying to do something about Dharma.

Since I took refuge in 1997, everything in my life has gone wrong: my marriage, gone; my ability to work, gone (I did not have the confidence to go for a job interview). I also had lung; I met with harm from non-humans; I met with harm from mad people. I had several painful encounters in relationship; my family thought I was strange and also criticized me for being a Buddhist. I woke up each day and was fearful, wondering how I could cope with another day.

However, while all these were manifesting, I had incredible opportunities to do retreat and to meet with a lot of holy beings who guided me personally. I also had, and still have, the opportunity to study Dharma. The most important thing, I feel, is that I am glad that I did not give up my lama.

Now after almost 17 years of things going all wrong, I suddenly realized that I am happy that all these have happened. It became so clear that everything – friends, relatives, this world and even my body – are all sufferings. I don’t think this is renunciation, but at least now I am recovered from depression and have started to reclaim my life: to eat right, to sleep right, and to start to have the energy and mind to take care of my personal household matters and work hard. Anyway, I just want to thank you and tell you that I truly am happy that I had all of these sufferings. They groomed me for who I am now.

Rinpoche responded:

My very dear, precious, kind, wish-fulfilling one,

Thank you very much for your kind letter and I’m so happy that you realized all the difficulties you have been through are positive.

Generally, the whole lam-rim is thought transformation, but there is thought transformation separate from the lam-rim. That thought transformation is when you utilize obstacles to practicing Dharma on the path to enlightenment – then you don’t have obstacles to practice Dharma! You use any difficulties like this for sentient beings to achieve enlightenment, not just temporary happiness and for yourself to achieve enlightenment. It’s unbelievable, most unbelievable and makes your life – even your death – most beneficial for sentient beings. This is what really we should practice.

The Kadampa Geshe Khamlungpa said among his advices: “This present small suffering being experienced purifies past negative karma (collected from beginingless past lives). Therefore, there will be happiness in the future. Therefore, rejoice in the suffering.” This means that experiencing suffering is very good, positive – that’s what he is saying. This is Kadampa Geshe Khamlungpa’s advice. So, all the usual complaints against you then are very positive.

Any praise, any good things are a cause for delusion to rise, so that’s no good and the opposite to renunciation. The bodhisattva Togme Sangpo has advised that whether you experience good or whether you experience bad, it’s all to use for enlightenment. It all depends on which label you chose to give. If you give a bad label to everything, everything becomes bad, becomes lung. So it’s very, very, very good that you took everything, that you understood everything as a way to achieve enlightenment. The way you think helps the mind to be more satisfied; everything brings peace of mind; everything becomes Dharma. That’s very wise; that’s REAL wise. Even for top political people in the world, I don’t think they know this. Take it as positive.

Thank you very much. Have a good life.

With much love and prayers,

Lama Zopa

Scribed by Ven. Sarah Thresher, Root Institute, Bodhgaya, India, February 2015. Edited by Mandala for inclusion on FPMT.org.

Learn more about Lama Zopa Rinpoche, spiritual director of the Foundation for the Preservation of Mahayana Tradition (FPMT), and Rinpoche’s vision for a better world. Sign up to receive news and updates.


http://fpmt.org/lama-zopa-rinpoche-news-and-advice/advice-from-lama-zopa-rinpoche/thought-transformation/
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How to Think During Relationship Problems
A student was going through relationship problems and Lama Zopa Rinpoche offered some advice on how to think while experiencing them:

All the problems are very good because they purify negative karma accumulated in the past. All those difficulties and problems in your life purify past very heavy negative karmas collected in many past lifetimes. And, by purifying those, you will experience much happiness in the future like the sun shining. So, it’s positive.

Remember, you received so many teachings for a long time, and especially on Chöd practice. Chöd should be not just chanting, but practice, especially dealing with all these problems that you are experiencing, difficulties you can utilize as the quickest way to achieve enlightenment for yourself and then free the numberless sentient beings from oceans of samsaric suffering and bring them to peerless happiness, the state of omniscience. 

[Contemplate:]Should even all the beings of the three realms without exception
Become angry at me, humiliate, criticize, threaten, or even kill me,
I seek your blessings not to be agitated, but to complete the perfection of patience
That works for their benefit in response to their harm.

There are also some teachings on patience I have given at Root Institute I will send you.

The essence is what is explained in Lama Chöpa:

Even if the environment and beings are filled with the fruits of negativity,
And unwished for sufferings pour down like rain,
I seek your blessings to take these miserable conditions as a path
By seeing them as causes to exhaust the results of my negative karma.

Please take time to think of the meaning.

Scribed by Ven. Sarah Thresher, Root Institute, Bodhgaya, India, March 2015. Edited by Mandala for inclusion on FPMT.org.

Learn more about Lama Zopa Rinpoche, spiritual director of the Foundation for the Preservation of Mahayana Tradition (FPMT), and Rinpoche’s vision for a better world. Sign up to receive news and updates.


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Grant Offered to Assist Rolwaling Sangag Choling Monastery School, Nepal
After receiving an appeal (below) from the Rolwaling Sangag Choling Monastery School, the Social Services Fund raised $US39,200 to assist with a desperately needed hostel for young Nepali school  children. After raising this money to help, Nepal suffered the 7.9 magnitude earthquake and the school also endured considerable damage. The grant offered to the school will now, not only need to assist with the hostel, but also to help with repairs needed elsewhere on the property. 

The school put together a beautiful video about the school, its history, aims, and needs.

Report from Rolwaling Sangag Choling Monastery SchoolIn the remote mountainous areas of Nepal, such as Rolwaling, many children are sadly deprived of a crucial and empowering education. Ngawang Lapsam Rinpoche was inspired to address this problem, establishing a free school with a special philosophy for children in the remote Dolakha District to attend. The school aims to provide a quality education, covering general academic and life skills through a traditional Buddhist education.

Starting with six children and one teacher in 2010, the school now successfully educates 15 children from poor families across the Dolakha District of Nepal at the primary school level and provides free boarding, medical attention, clothing and other needs to its students.

Children living as far away as Kathmandu (three days walk and 10 hour bus journey) where schools are numerous, live away from home in order to receive this special education which follows a curriculum approved by the government enables them to pursue further studies if they wish.

The school is currently managing its operation using limited Nepalese Government support which covers only staff wages, donations from the villagers, and some other support from sponsors.

However, these funds only cover the children’s food, clothing and medical care, leaving the school and its community with huge challenges while trying to provide an education to these children who are attempting to break the cycle of poverty.

Initial funding for building work only covered the school building itself. By adding the classrooms, an office and a very small (and cramped kitchen/dining hall) there is currently nowhere for the children to sleep as all but one live away from home to attend the school.

Arrangements for them to sleep with local families and then in a local house sadly didn’t work out for a number of reasons, so the children now need to sleep on classroom floor and kitchen floors if they wish to continue to receive a quality education.

These children and their families know this is the best education they can receive in the district so the children endure these difficult circumstances to keep their dreams of a better future for themselves and their families alive.

Besides the obvious discomfort caused by needing to sleep on floors while living in such a harsh remote Himalayan environment, it also poses other problems for the school. Girls are currently unable to attend if they don’t live in the nearest village (which no primary school age girls currently do) as there is no room for them to have their own private space in which to sleep, essential at their age and when living away from home.

In addition to the school being unable to teach girls, using two classrooms as bedrooms with mats on the floors for sleeping means they cannot be used for teaching. In turn, this limits the number of students which can be accepted by the school despite a current waiting list of over 20 children from across the district wanting to attend.

The inability to accept new students also poses the risk of being unable to meet government targets of a new intake of students each year. If this target isn’t met, staff funding could be stopped resulting in closure of the school.

A new hostel and kitchen/dining hall will solve many of these problems providing the students with a warmer, and therefore more comfortable and safer place to sleep while freeing up classroom space to enable the school to accept new students. This can mean a quality education for girls in the district while accepting new students from their waiting list each year helping to ensure government the continuation of government funding, securing the future of the school.

You can support the Rolwaling Sangag Choling Monastery School directly:http://www.rolwalingmonastery.org/support-us

The Social Services Fund contributes, as funds allow, to many charitable and beneficial activities, particularly in India, Nepal, Tibet and Mongolia. You can support this work or learn more about previous grants and support offered. 


http://fpmt.org/charitable-activities/projects/social-services/grant-offered-to-assist-rolwaling-sangag-choling-monastery-school-nepal/
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Helping Rebuild Lawudo Retreat Centre After the Earthquake
For students of Lama Zopa Rinpoche, Lawudo, which is situated high in the Himalayan mountains of eastern Nepal, holds particular significance. Lama Zopa Rinpoche is the reincarnation of the Lawudo Lama, Lama Kunzang Yeshe, who lived and practiced in Lawudo until his passing at age 81. The Lawudo Retreat Centre was built over several years and completed in 1972 under direction from Lama Zopa Rinpoche. The gompa was built so that young monks in the area could receive a good education with favorable conditions. Since that time, Rinpoche’s mother (who passed away in 1991), sister Anila Ngawang Samten, and brother Sangay Sherpa have cared for the Lawudo Lawudo Retreat Centre and welcomed pilgrims, retreatants and locals to this extremely blessed and remote place. 

The property, which includes the gompa as well as a retreat houses, a library and prayer wheel, suffered extensive damage from the 7.9 magnitude earthquake and subsequent aftershocks in April of this year. Fortunately, those living at Lawudo are all okay. They have been living in tents outside. However, it is getting very cold and proper accommodation will be required as soon as possible. 

When Sangay Sherpa surveyed the damage at the end of May he reported:

I have inspected all the damages in Lawudo and am ready to start renovation work. Due to damages from the earthquake it is very difficult to find workers but I luckily found a builder and carpenter so I have booked them. 

I am rushing to do the renovation work because in monsoon season, due to heavy rain, the damaged parts will be made worse and may collapsed more. Then, after monsoon season, the Winter starts and as you know in Winter no work can be done in Lawudo. So I should finish the renovation work as soon as possible. I have targeted to finish the renovation of retreat houses. I am planning to renovate all damages very finely so it cannot be damaged by upcoming normal disasters. So we don’t have any problems in future. Due to the remoteness of Lawudo we can’t organize renovation work again and again. We should be confident about the strength of this renovation work.

The Nepal Earthquake Support Fund offered US$50,000 toward this much-needed renovation work in Lawudo. So many generous donors have contributed to the Nepal Earthquake Support Fund making this offering possible. Additionally, Australian nun Ven. Katy Cole recently traveled to Lawudo to help facilitate this work and thanks to the kindness of Effie Fletcher and Amber Bamjan Tamang, a kitchen tent, tarp and rope were brought to Lawudo by helicopter. Please rejoice in the kindness offered by many to help rebuild from damages sustained. 

All are welcome to donate to the Nepal Earthquake Support Fund. 
https://my.fpmt.org/donate/socialservicesfund


You can learn more about Lawudo Gompa and the history of Lawudo. 
http://www.lawudo.com/About.html


http://fpmt.org/charitable-activities/projects/social-services/helping-rebuild-lawudo-retreat-centre-after-the-earthquake/
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"You Know So Much, But You Make One Mistake"
On July 25, Ven. Roger Kunsang shared on his Twitter page this from Lama Zopa Rinpoche, who was teaching in Copenhagen, Denmark, at an event organized by Tong-nyi Nying-je Ling:

Lama Zopa; you know so much but you make one mistake that cheats you from making your life meaningful, u don’t think of your own death.

High quality videos of Rinpoche’s teachings in Copenhagen will be made available on the FPMT.org:
http://fpmt.org/media/streaming/teachings-of-lama-zopa-rinpoche/

Ven. Roger Kunsang, Lama Zopa Rinpoche’s assistant and CEO of FPMT Inc., shares Lama Zopa Rinpoche’s recent pith sayings on Ven. Roger’s Twitter page. (You can also read them on Ven. Roger’s Facebook page.)

More information, photos and updates about FPMT spiritual director Lama Zopa Rinpoche can be found on Rinpoche’s webpage. If you’d like to receive news of Lama Zopa Rinpoche via email, sign up to receive FPMT News.


http://fpmt.org/lama-zopa-rinpoche-news-and-advice/lama-zopa-rinpoche-news/you-know-so-much-but-you-make-one-mistake/
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LRZTP7 Introduces Tibetan Langauge Teacher Franziska Oertle
In October 2015 the seventh Lotsawa Rinchen Zangpo Translator Programme (LRZTP7) will begin. LRZTP is FPMT’s only Tibetan-language interpretation program, located in Dharamsala, India. Students spend two years in Dharamsala acquiring the language skills necessary for interpretation and can spend another two years outside of Dharamsala receiving onsite training as an apprentice interpreter.

One of LRZTP7’s newest teachers is Swiss-born Franziska Oertle. After meeting His Holiness the Dalai Lama in 2006, Franziska moved to Bouddhnath, Nepal, where she lived with a Tibetan host family and studied Buddhist philosophy and Himalayan languages at Kathmandu University (Rangjung Yeshe Institute – RYI). After finishing her Bachelors degree in 2009, she worked as a Tibetan language instructor and interpreter trainer while completing her Masters degree in Tibetan grammar.

Since then, Franziska as been teaching colloquial Tibetan language on various levels and institutions in Nepal and India including: the Emory University Study Abroad semester; the RYI Intensive Summer Course; the School of International Training; and Sarah College.

Wishing to contribute to Tibetan language learners as well as the preservation of the endangered Tibetan language, Franziska is writing a colloquial Tibetan manual. Unlike other textbooks, it synthesizes traditional indigenous Tibetan grammar and contemporary language learning methods.

LRZTP7 director Yaron Bahir sat down with Franziska to talk to her about the studying and teaching of Tibetan: 

What is the benefit of studying the Tibetan language?

Since language is inherently linked with culture, one can probably only gain a deep and thorough understanding of Tibetan people and the Dharma if one knows the Tibetan language. One of the major personal gains is being directly able to understand Tibetan lamas and rinpoches.

On a more global level, every Tibetan language student contributes to the preservation of an endangered language. And in the case of translators, they are the bridge between languages and cultures and are indispensable for the spreading of the Dharma.

What methods of teaching do you use to teach the Tibetan language?

The Tibetan language is very peculiar and its grammar extremely vast, profound, and beautiful. Therefore, I find it very important for students to understand the Tibetan language from within by studying the two major Tibetan grammar treatises, the Sum cu pa and rTags kyi ‘jug pa. At the same time, in order for the language to become alive we need to embrace contemporary (communicational) teaching methods and a large variety of different activities, supports, and materials, such as dialogues, stories, games, audio, electronic dictionaries, flash card programs on phones and iPads, etc.

Do you have any brief advice for anyone who wants to study Tibetan?

You just have to love it! When we love what we are doing, we learn more quickly and happily. And my second heart advice: immerse and connect yourself into the Tibetan-speaking world as much as you can. Ideally, if your life-conditions permit, live for some time in a Tibetan-speaking part of the world.

Registration for LRZTP7 is now open. Please visit the website for more information: www.lrztp.org

Mandala brings you news of Lama Zopa Rinpoche and of activities, teachings and events from nearly 160 FPMT centers, projects and services around the globe. If you like what you read on Mandala, consider becoming a Friend of FPMT, which supports our work.


http://fpmt.org/fpmt-community-news/news-around-the-world/lrztp7-introduces-tibetan-langauge-teacher-franziska-oertle/
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Grant from Education and Preservation Fund Offered to Foundation for Developing Compassion and Wisdom
FPMT’s founder, Lama Yeshe, established what he called “Universal Education” which was an education of human hearts focusing on the universal language of compassion and wisdom, rather than emphasizing a strictly Buddhist approach. 

Lama Yeshe’s view was that the aims and methods of many modern education systems over-emphasize intellectual achievements and are too limited in their scope. As a result, they fail to enable children, young people and adults to fully develop their potential, to lead a fulfilled and meaningful life, and to play their part in creating a more peaceful world.

Lama Yeshe’s proposal was to draw on the “heritage of wisdom” that resides in the great religious and philosophical traditions of the world to create a new kind of Universal Education. 

You can watch a video of Lama Yeshe discussing the purpose of Universal Education in 1982. 

The Foundation for Developing Compassion and Wisdom (FDWC) brings Lama Yeshe’s message of Universal Education forward through programs and resources which promote:

mindfulness and self-awarenessemotional intelligence and resilienceempathy, kindness and social responsibilityharmonious and caring relationshipsa greater sense of well-being and purposeThe Education and Preservation Fund was pleased to recently offer US$50,000 toward the incredible ongoing work and annual budget of FDCW. 

You can learn more about the work of FDWC, get involved, or explore the resources available to you. 

The Education and Preservation Fund supports Dharma study and contributes to the development of homestudy programs, online Buddhist education programs and the preservation of the Dharma through the publication of Dharma practice materials and translations. 


http://fpmt.org/charitable-activities/projects/education-and-preservation/grant-from-education-and-preservation-fund-offered-to-foundation-for-developing-compassion-and-wisdom/
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Choe Khor Sum Ling Consecrates Statues
On April 25-27 FPMT center Choe Khor Sum Ling (CKSL) in Bangalore, India carried out the wishes of Lama Zopa Rinpoche by organizing the consecration of its gompa statues. Student Danyèle Grignon shared the news with Mandala:

The auspicious set of dates had been identified as April 25-27. Saffron water was poured in the offering bowls and garlands of flowers ornamented the altars. The monks from Gyume Monastery had collected scented substances, medicines, different types of grains and other items. Tormas were prepared in red and white colors.

On April 25, the 15 monks of Gyume Monastery sat in two rows to open the ceremony with the relevant prayers and offerings. Lama Choepel, in charge to lead the rituals, uttered mantras while sprinkling holy water, rice and purifying herbs.

Lay people participated throughout the days of pujas, developing patience and deep listening. They prayed, read Dharma books, meditated and copied some verses of The Sutra of Golden Light.

Later in the evening, Ven. Namjong from Sera Je Monastery gave the oral transmission of “Teaching on Ultimate Reality.”

Our collective prayers were dedicated to Nepal and a Medicine Buddha puja was offered for the earthquakes to stop and for the benefit of all the victims.

On April 26, students were offered a jenang, a tantric empowerment, and on April 27, two sur (aroma charity) ceremonies were conducted on the rooftop of the center.

Lama Zopa Rinpoche encouraged us to engage in these activities to collect extensive merits and pacify obstacles to CKSL Dharma projects, especially the expansion into a new location. 

Mandala brings you news of Lama Zopa Rinpoche and of activities, teachings and events from over 160 FPMT centers, projects and services around the globe. If you like what you read on Mandala, consider becoming a Friend of FPMT, which supports our work.


http://fpmt.org/fpmt-community-news/news-around-the-world/choe-khor-sum-ling-consecrates-statues/
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You Have So Much to Rejoice About in This Life
A student completed Lama Zopa Rinpoche’s advice of accumulating 200,000 Vajrasattva mantras and wrote Rinpoche to let him know. Rinpoche responded with thanks and teachings on the power of bodhichitta:

My very dear, most precious, most kind, wish-fullfilling one,

Thank you a billion, million, zillion times for following my advice and doing a 200,000-Vajrasattva retreat and for now doing OM MANI PADME HUM. I’m sure that you must be doing it with a bodhichitta motivation to free sentient beings – numberless hell beings, hungry ghosts, animals, humans, suras and auras – from oceans of samsaric suffering and bring them to the state of omniscience, sangye, elimination of all the obscurations and completion of all the realizations. In that case, with each OM MANI PADME HUM and Vajrasattva mantra, you are purifying the obscurations created over beginningless rebirths and collecting more than skies of merit. 

Lama Atisha said in the Lamp of the Path to Enlightenment, quoting the Sutra Requested by Pachin [verses 16-17]:

“If somebody offers buddha fields, buddha worlds, equaling the sand grains of the river Ganga (here, ‘equaling the number of sand grains of the river Ganga,’ when it talks about the benefits of bodhichitta, ‘the river Ganga’ doesn’t mean the Indian river Ganga, it means the Pacific Ocean, the sand grains of the Pacific Ocean) filled up with the seven different jewels like gold, diamonds, sapphires, etc., and offers that to the buddhas, but then somebody puts the palms together at the heart and simply generates bodhichitta, this offering is greater and it has no limit.” 

What it is saying is, for example, if you offer buddha worlds filled with the seven different jewels equal to the number of sand grains in your hand, even that merit is beyond our understanding. We can’t figure that merit out. That is unbelievable, unbelievable – most unbelievable merit. Now, here, it is talking about buddha worlds equaling the number of sand grains of the Pacific Ocean filled up with seven different jewels, so there’s no way we can understand the merit. It’s amazing, amazing, amazing, amazing, amazing.

Now, somebody simply puts their hands at the heart and thinks: “May I achieve full enlightenment in order to free all the sentient beings from the oceans of samsaric suffering and bring them to a state of omniscience.” This creates more than skies of merit – much, much, much, greater than the previous example. The merit from the previous example becomes very small by comparison, even though it’s beyond our conception. 

Therefore, you have so much to rejoice about in this life.

Thank you so much,

With much love and prayers,

Lama Zopa

Scribed by Ven. Sarah Thresher, Root Institute, Bodhgaya, India, March 2015. Edited by Mandala for inclusion on FPMT.org.

Learn more about Lama Zopa Rinpoche, spiritual director of the Foundation for the Preservation of Mahayana Tradition (FPMT), and Rinpoche’s vision for a better world. Sign up to receive news and updates.


http://fpmt.org/lama-zopa-rinpoche-news-and-advice/advice-from-lama-zopa-rinpoche/you-have-so-much-to-rejoice-about-in-this-life/
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Blessing Medicine Practice Now Available from FPMT Education Services
Lama Zopa Rinpoche teaches that every activity can be transformed into an opportunity to benefit ourselves and others. FPMT Education Services is pleased to release, as a free PDF, Lama Zopa Rinpoche’s translation of Pänchen Losang Chögyen’s Blessing Medicine practice. This practice can be done when taking medicine. 

Through comprehensive study programs, practice materials, training seminars, and scholarships, FPMT Education nourishes the development of compassion, wisdom, kindness, and true happiness in individuals of all ages


http://fpmt.org/edu-news/blessing-medicine-practice-now-available-from-fpmt-education-services/
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Experiencing Disease as a Meaningful Retreat
“Without the self-cherishing thought, if we experience AIDS, cancer or any heavy disease, we can use this disease to become a great, quick, very powerful purification,” encourages Lama Zopa Rinpoche in Cutting the Root of Samsara, the third volume in a Lama Yeshe Wisdom Archive series drawn from the 24th Kopan course in 1991. “We can experience this disease in order to benefit all sentient beings. It becomes a very powerful, very quick way to finish the work of purifying the obscurations and a quick way to finish the work of accumulating extensive merit. As we are experiencing the disease for the sake of all sentient beings, even in each second we are accumulating infinite merit. So experiencing these diseases without the self-cherishing thought becomes the quick path to enlightenment, like practicing tantra. It’s like doing many hundreds of thousands of Vajrasattva retreats, like doing many hundreds of thousands of prostrations with the Thrity-five Buddhas’ names, like doing many hundreds of thousands of preliminary practices.

“When we experience this disease on behalf of other sentient beings, without the self-cherishing thought, then there will be great compassion, bodhichitta, for other sentient beings. Therefore, it becomes incredibly meaningful, worthwhile, to experience. It’s the means of quickly purifying, very powerfully purifying, and a quick way to accumulate extensive merit in each second. Like this, it’s a quick way to achieve enlightenment and to liberate sentient beings.

“The whole experience becomes an incredible means. Even if we have to experience this disease for a hundred years, for a thousand years, even if we have to live our whole life with this heavy disease, it becomes a hundred-year retreat, a thousand-year retreat – however long we have the disease. It becomes a very meaningful retreat.”

Find Cutting the Root of Samsara on the Lama Yeshe Wisdom Archive: http://bit.ly/cutting-the-root-of-samsara

Lama Zopa Rinpoche is the spiritual director of the Foundation for the Preservation of Mahayana Tradition (FPMT), a Tibetan Buddhist organization dedicated to the transmission of the Mahayana Buddhist tradition and values worldwide through teaching, meditation and community service.


http://fpmt.org/lama-zopa-rinpoche-news-and-advice/lama-zopa-rinpoche-news/experiencing-disease-as-a-meaningful-retreat/
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Introduction
The FPMT is an organization devoted to the transmission of the Mahayana Buddhist tradition and values worldwide through teaching, meditation and community service. We provide  integrated education through which people’s minds and hearts can be transformed into their highest potential for the benefit of others, inspired by an attitude of universal responsibility. We are committed to creating harmonious  environments and helping all beings develop their full potential of infinite  wisdom and compassion.

Our organization is based on the Buddhist tradition of Lama Tsongkhapa of Tibet as  taught to us by our founder, Lama Thubten Yeshe and our spiritual director,  Lama Thubten Zopa Rinpoche.