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GeoSciences Column: Improving together – science writing and football

Writing is something that those pursuing a career in academia are expected to be good at. It is a requirement of the job, yet it is a skill few get any formal training in and simply rely on the old saying that practice makes perfect.

But what if there is another way?

Mathew Stiller-Reeve is a co-founder of Climatesnack, a writing group organization, which aims to tackle the problem.

In today’s post on #EGUBlogs Mathew considers how the workings of a football team might reflect the successes of the writing groups that started in the ClimateSnack project: egu.eu/3EI0CM

#sciencewriting #sciencecommunication #earlycareerscientists #EGUecs #EGUjournals
Writing is something that those pursuing a career in academia are expected to be good at. It is a requirement of the job, yet it is a skill few get any formal training in and simply rely on the old saying that practice makes perfect. But what if there is another way? Mathew Stiller-Reeve is a co-founder...
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Magnitude 6.2 earthquake in central Italy

Early today, a magnitude 6.2 earthquake hit central Italy at 03:36 am local time (CEST).

The epicentre of the earthquake was at (42.71 N, 13.22 E), according to the European-Mediterranean Seismological Centre. This is about 110 km northeast of Rome and about 35 km north of the deadly magnitude 6.3 earthquake that hit L’Aquila in 2009.

The earthquake took place within the well-known seismic belt, characterised by prevalent normal faulting, which runs NW-SE along the Central Apennines.

For a more detialed report and a list of resources on the geology of the region, as well as more news of the earthquake, head to our website: egu.eu/00XDU4

#earthquake #EGUnews #Italy #Amatrice #Accumoli #naturalhazards #seismology #structuralgeology
Early today, a magnitude 6.2 earthquake hit central Italy at 03:36 am local time (CEST). The epicentre of the earthquake was at (42.71 N, 13.22 E), according to the European-Mediterranean Seismological Centre. This is about 110 km northeast of Rome and about 35 km north of the deadly magnitude 6.3 earthquake that hit L’Aquila in 2009.
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This one ended up in the spam folder here in the community. I enabled it to view status after I had already seen your page post and shared it here. 
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There is a third pole on earth, and it's melting quickly

"When we think of the world’s polar regions, only two usually spring to mind – the North and South. However, there is a region to the south of China and the north of India that is known as the Third Pole," explains the World Economic Forum

"It is the third largest area of frozen water on the planet, covering 100,000 square kilometres with some 46,000 glaciers."

Since 2005, scientists have found that, the rate at which the Third Pole’s glaciers are melting has almost doubled.

To find out what this means for the populations whose livelihoods depende on the icy terrains, read the full report here:egu.eu/70EH5O

‪#‎thirdpole‬ ‪#‎cryosphere‬ ‪#‎meting‬ ‪#‎climatechange‬ ‪#‎globalwarming‬
Scientists are warning of disturbing global warming trends in the region known as the Third Pole will affect the lives of 1.3 billion people.
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What if you could breathe a longer life into your scientific posters?

One which would mean you’ll reach audiences you never expected, while transforming your work into a brand new, useful product?

Today we speak to Sandra de Vries, a former master student, who also crafts posters into wearable garments, breathing a new lease of life into your scientific findings.

It all starts with a textile poster – where your presentation is printed on fabric as opposed to paper – which Sandra then turns into anything from a tie, to a tote bag, through to a skirt!

Find out more in today's ‪#‎GeoTalk‬ interview over on ‪#‎EGUBlogs‬: egu.eu/5GOBH8

‪#‎EGU16‬ ‪#‎conference‬ ‪#‎posters‬ ‪#‎ties‬ ‪#‎totebags‬ ‪#‎beachbags‬
Conference posters: Most scientists spend tens (if not hundreds) of working hours perfecting their conference poster. There’s not just the science to think about, but also the design, the flow, the images, the language… The list is endless. Once complete, you print it, roll it up and feed it into...
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GeoPolicy: How do Members of European Parliament learn about science?

Only ~5% of Members of European Parliament, or MEPs, have a background in the physical sciences, yet many political challenges require an understanding of the science surrounding these issues. This month’s GeoPolicy post on the EGU Blog GeoLog takes a closer look at how the European Parliament gathers and requests scientific evidence: egu.eu/7EIB1O

‪#‎EGUPolicy‬ ‪#‎EGUblogs‬
Only ~5% of Members of European Parliament, or MEPs, have a background in the physical sciences1, yet many political challenges require an understanding of the science surrounding these issues. Issues such as locating and extracting mineral resources, understanding climate change impacts, and developing...
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Seks
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Fieldwork at 5,000 meters in altitude

Imja Lake is one of the largest glacial lakes in the Nepal Himalaya and has received a great deal of attention in the last couple decades due to the potential for a glacial lake outburst flood.

There is a project currently underway to lower the level of the lake by 3 m to reduce the flood hazard.

In this post over on the Cryosphere Blog, guest blogger David Rounce, recounts the story of his field work, which aims to understand how quickly the glacier is melting and how rapidly the lake is expanding such that we can model the flood hazard in the future - all at a staggering 5000m altitude!

Find out more in this blog post: egu.eu/86MURK
‪#‎Himalayas‬ ‪#‎lakes‬ ‪#‎geomorphology‬ ‪#‎glacier‬ ‪#‎ImjaLake‬ ‪#‎cryosphere‬ ‪#‎EGUBlogs‬
Imja Lake is one of the largest glacial lakes in the Nepal Himalaya and has received a great deal of attention in the last couple decades due to the potential for a glacial lake outburst flood. In response to these concerns, the UNDP has funded a project that is currently lowering the level of the lake...
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Have them in circles
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Planet found in habitable zone around nearest star

Astronomers have found clear evidence of a planet orbiting the closest star to Earth, Proxima Centauri.

"Proxima b orbits much closer to its star than Mercury does to the Sun in the Solar System, the star itself is far fainter than the Sun. As a result Proxima b lies well within the habitable zone around the star and has an estimated surface temperature that would allow the presence of liquid water," highlights ESO Astronomy.

"This discovery will be the beginning of extensive further observations, both with current instruments [5] and with the next generation of giant telescopes such as the European Extremely Large Telescope."

Read the full press release here: egu.eu/7PAJ1W

The story also features on the BBC website: egu.eu/8Z56TM

You'll find reports on Nature & Science Magazines too: egu.eu/6U2GOV & egu.eu/8ZUH7M

#ProximaB #ProximaCentauri #planetaryscience #planets #life
Planet orbiting Proxima Centauri is likely to be the focus of future interstellar voyages.
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i posted a "artist Concept " of this
? planet ? here :

http://forum.celestialmatters.org/viewtopic.php?f=17&t=864#p14348
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Magnitude 6.2 earthquake in central Italy

Early today, a magnitude 6.2 earthquake hit central Italy at 03:36 am local time (CEST).

The epicentre of the earthquake was at (42.71 N, 13.22 E), according to the European-Mediterranean Seismological Centre. This is about 110 km northeast of Rome and about 35 km north of the deadly magnitude 6.3 earthquake that hit L’Aquila in 2009.

The earthquake took place within the well-known seismic belt, characterised by prevalent normal faulting, which runs NW-SE along the Central Apennines.

For a more detialed report and a list of resources on the geology of the region, as well as more news of the earthquake, head to our website: egu.eu/00XDU4

#earthquake #EGUnews #Italy #Amatrice #Accumoli #naturalhazards #seismology #structuralgeology
Early today, a magnitude 6.2 earthquake hit central Italy at 03:36 am local time (CEST). The epicentre of the earthquake was at (42.71 N, 13.22 E), according to the European-Mediterranean Seismological Centre. This is about 110 km northeast of Rome and about 35 km north of the deadly magnitude 6.3 earthquake that hit L’Aquila in 2009.
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Dat z very bad
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Imaggeo on Mondays: counting stars

This year’s imaggeo photo contest saw humdreds of great entries. Among the winning images was a stunning night-sky panorama by Vytas Huth.

In today’s post, Vytas describes how he captured the image and how the remote location in Southern Germany is one of the few (in Europe) where it is still posssible to, clearly, image the Milk Way: egu.eu/7X90EH

‪#‎NightSky‬ ‪#‎MilkyWay‬ ‪#‎Imaggeo‬ ‪#‎EGUBlogs‬
This year’s imaggeo photo contest saw humdreds of great entries. Among the winning images was a stunning night-sky panorama by Vytas Huth. In today’s post, Vytas describes how he captured the image and how the remote location in Southern Germany is one of the few (in Europe) where it is still...
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How did rising greenhouse gas emissions, coupled with a strong El Niño event, make 2015 into a record-breaker?

Greenhouse gases: Scientists at the Mauna Loa Observatory recorded the heighest concntrations of CO2, methane and nitrous oxides, ever recorded, during 2015.

Global surface temperature: 2015 globally averaged surface temperature was 0.42-0.46°C above the 1981–2010 average, reports Carbon Brief.

Oceans: Global sea surface temperatures (SSTs) in 2015 were 0.33-0.39C above the 1981-2010 average.

Find out more details of why and how 2015 became a record-breaking year in this story: egu.eu/1FCBIS

‪#‎climate‬ ‪#‎greenhousegas‬ ‪#‎carbondioxide‬ ‪#‎methane‬ ‪#‎oceans‬ ‪#‎temperature‬
Last year saw records in the Earth’s climate system continue to tumble, says the latest...
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How does dune stabilising vegetation helps the fight against coastal erosion?

Striking images of receding coastlines, where households once far away from a cliff edge, tumble into the sea after a storm surge, are an all too familiar consequence of the power of coastal erosion.

Grasses, such as the ones pictured in this week’s featured imaggeo image, work by slowing down wind speeds across the face of the dunes and trapping and stabilising wind-blown sands.

Find out more in today's Imaggeo on Mondays post over on ‪#‎EGUBlogs‬: egu.eu/1B2Z6H

‪#‎coastalerosion‬ ‪#‎erosion‬ ‪#‎coast‬ ‪#‎wind‬ ‪#‎wave‬ ‪#‎ocean‬ ‪#‎geomorphology‬ ‪#‎sea‬ ‪#‎sand‬ ‪#‎dune‬
Coastlines take a battering from stormy seas, gales, windy conditions and every-day wave action. The combined effect of these processes shapes coastal landscapes across the globe. In calm weather, constructive waves deposit materials eroded elsewhere and transported along the coast line via longshore-drift,...
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What is geomorphometry?

It is the science of quantitative terrain characterization; in other words, mapping the shape of terrains.

Understanding the shapes of the terrestrial landscape are important for many Earth systems across a range of scales.

For instance, broadscale features such as mountains and valleys may dictate weather patterns, vegetation and biodiversity patterns, and hydrological processes. Fine-scale features such as local slope may influence soil stability or influence nest-site selection by certain bird species.

Until now, geomorphometry has focused on the investigation of terrestrial landscapes.

Now, geomorphometric techniques have been applied to characterize the seafloor.

The dynamic, four-dimensional nature of the marine environment and differences in data collection methods cause issues for geomorphometry that are specific to marine applications.

A new article in the open access EGU Journal, Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, offers the first review of marine geomorphometry to date: egu.eu/0OR1DM

‪#‎EGUjournals‬ ‪#‎geomorphometry‬ ‪#‎terrestrial‬ ‪#‎landscapes‬ ‪#‎seafloor‬
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Have them in circles
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Laura Roberts (EGU Communications Officer) EGU Executive Office Luisenstrasse 37 80333 Munich Germany
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Introduction

The European Geosciences Union (EGU, www.egu.eu) is Europe’s premier geosciences union, dedicated to the pursuit of excellence in the Earth, planetary and space sciences for the benefit of humanity, worldwide. It was established in September 2002 as a merger of the European Geophysical Society (EGS) and the European Union of Geosciences (EUG), and has headquarters in Munich, Germany. 

It is a non-profit international union of scientists with over 12,000 members from all over the world. Membership is open to individuals who are professionally engaged in or associated with geosciences and planetary and space sciences and related studies, including students and retired seniors.

The EGU has a current portfolio of 17 diverse scientific journals, which use an innovative open access format, and organises a number of topical meetings, and education and outreach activities. Its annual General Assembly is the largest and most prominent European geosciences event, attracting over 12,000 scientists from all over the world. The meeting’s sessions cover a wide range of topics, including volcanology, planetary exploration, the Earth’s internal structure and atmosphere, climate, as well as energy and resources.