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A new look at the Mississippi’s enormous watershed reveals the true size and strength of the world’s fourth longest river.

"The animation & map is based on a U.S. Geological Survey database of the direction water is flowing at every point on Earth. Using the streamflow data, NASA’s Horace Mitchell traced the path of all the water that runs into the Gulf via the Mississippi," reports National Geographic.

egu.eu/4W4OY1

#Mississippi #hydrology #water #river #satellite #map
A new look at the Mississippi’s enormous watershed reveals the true size and strength of the world’s fourth longest river.
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Did you know that 10 million metric tonnes of #plastic make their way into the #oceans every year?

Erik van Sebille is an oceanographer at the Grantham Institute at Imperial Collage London, and winner of the 2016 Ocean Sciences Division Outstanding Young Scientist Award.

Erik's research aims to address problems with societal impacts, such as what dynamics govern drifting debris that collects in garbage patches and the pathways of the Fukushima radioactive plume.

Find out more in today's GeoTalk interview over on #EGUBlogs: egu.eu/4NLDSE

#oceanography #contamination #oceans #plastic #garbage #garbagepatch #drifting
Geotalk is a regular feature highlighting early career researchers and their work. In this interview we speak to Erik van Sebille, an oceanographer at the Grantham Institute at Imperial Collage London, and winner of the 2016 OS Outstanding Young Scientist Award. As an expert in understanding how oceans...
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Dealing with the legacy of surface mining.

Surface mining, a particular type of resource extraction, is devastating. It involves strip mining, open-pit mining and mountaintop-removal mining and accounts for more than 80% of ore mined each year.

Surface mining disturbs the landscape and impacts habitat integrity, environmental flows and ecosystem functions; it raises concerns about water, air and soil quality, and often also public health.

A new study reviews the possible routes to deal with the legacies of surface mining - known as the R4 - and it is explained in more detial over on #EGUBlogs: egu.eu/5DLUVC

#mining #exploration #surfacemining #resources #energy #ERE
Mirny mine, a former open fit diamond mine, now inactive, located in Mirny, Eastern Siberia, Russia. The mine is 525 meters deep (4th in the world) and has a diameter of 1,200 m, and is one of the largest excavated holes in the world. . Credit: Jean-Daniel Paris (distributed via imaggeo.egu.eu) The Scorpion...
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Camping in Iceland, while trying to understand a complex ignimbrite (a type of volcaninc deposit) unit, for 10 days requires a fair amount of kit.

Among other things, emergency supplies of food and sturdy footwear, you never know, you might end up fording rivers or walking for km on end!

Take a peek in a #volcanologists field bag over on #EGUBlogs: egu.eu/2S71TV

#FieldRucksack #fieldwork #Iceland #rivers #glaciers
When you head out into the field, which is the one item you can’t do without? For Rebecca Williams, a volcanologist at the University of Hull, good footwear is essential! Inspired by a post on Lifehacker on what your average geologist carries in their rucksack/backpack, we’ve put together a few...
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Polar bears are among the animals most affected by changes in Arctic sea ice because they rely on this surface for essential activities such as hunting, traveling and breeding.

The analysis, published in the EGU's open access journal The Cryosphere, shows that the critical timing of the sea ice break-up and sea ice freeze-up is changing across all areas in a direction that is harmful for polar bears.

To find out more, read the full press release, jointly issued by EGU, University of Washington and NASA Goddard: egu.eu/1VQSO3

#PolarBears #SeaIce #Arctic #climatechange #globalwarming #cryosphere
New research published in The Cryosphere finds a trend toward earlier sea ice melt in the spring and later ice growth in the autumn across all 19 polar bear populations, which can negatively impact the feeding and breeding capabilities of the bears.
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Why do volcanoes erupt? Will we ever be able to predict when they will? How can we minimise the hazards resulting from an eruption?

David Pyle (an Oxford University volcanology professor) will be answering these and many more questions about #volcanoes in our live Twitter #AMA (ask me anything) later on today!

Join in, we'd love to hear your questions! Simply include the #EGUchat hashtag in your tweet! 
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Over the course of centuries and millennia, the force of winds, seas, ice and rains, sculpt rock formations around the globe.

When the force of winds and salty waters combine, their effect on the surface of rocks is quite unique. In some costal environments, a network of holes, of all shapes and sizes, puncture otherwise smooth and silky rocks.

This form of weathering is aptly known as honeycomb weathering.

Want to know how it happens? Head over to the #EGUBlogs: egu.eu/86H4KB

#weathering #honeycombweathering #Sardinia #imaggeo
Over the course of centuries and millennia, the force of winds, seas, ice and rains, sculpt rock formations around the globe. From the world-famous glacier carved landscapes of Yosemite National Park, to the freeze-thawed hoodoos at Bryce National Park, through to the wind battered stone pillars of South...
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Why does the lava from a volcano glow bright blue?

"he mountain contains large amounts of pure sulfur, which emits an icy violet color as it burns, turning the rocky slopes into a hot (at least 239 degrees Fahrenheit), highly toxic environment," reports Amazing Geologist: egu.eu/0CESZQ

You can find more detials about the unusual Indonesian volcano in this Smithsonian Magazine story too: egu.eu/5P5K6Y

With thanks to the EGU Geochemistry, Mineralogy, Petrology, Volcanology Division for alerting us to this great photo gallery!

#volcanology #eruption #lava #geochemistry #Indonesia #sulphur
Olivier Grunewald's dramatic photos showcase blue flames—not blue lava—that result from burning sulfur
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The Gulf of Corinth, in southern Greece, separates the Peloponnese peninsula from the continental mainland. The structural geology of the region is complex, largely defined by the subduction of the African Plate below the Eurasian Plate (a little to the south).

The active tectonics result in a plethora of other natural hazards, not only earthquakes. Minor and major faults crisscross the area and have the potential to trigger landslides, posing a threat to lives and infrastructure. A road, swept away in a landslide, in the northern Peloponnese (along the southern margin of the Corinth rift) is a clear example of the hazard.

Find out more about the tectonics and associated natural hazards of this region of Greece over on #EGUBlogs: egu.eu/1RQ05X

#structuralgeology #geology #sedimentology #Greece #naturalhazards
The Gulf of Corinth, in southern Greece, separates the Peloponnese peninsula from the continental mainland. The structural geology of the region is complex, largely defined by the subduction of the African Plate below the Eurasian Plate (a little to the south). The Gulf itself is an active extensional...
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GeoPolicy: What is the policy cycle and how can science strengthen this process?

One way to improve the impact of your scientific research is to engage with policy. Doing so can create new opportunities for yourself and your research. The main challenges are knowing when and how to effectively communicate scientific results to policy. This month’s GeoPolicy post takes a look at the policy cycle and how science can be included to strengthen this practice: http://egu.eu/8W6HDA

#EGUBlogs #EGUpolicy #scipolicy
One way to improve the impact of your scientific research is to engage with policy. Doing so can create new opportunities for yourself and your research. The main challenges are knowing when and how to effectively communicate scientific results to policy. If the wrong timing or communication method is...
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Why do volcanoes erupt? Will we ever be able to predict when they will? How can we minimise the hazards resulting from an eruption?

David Pyle (an Oxford University volcanology professor) will be answering these and many more questions about #volcanoes in our live Twitter #AMA (ask me anything) later on today!

Join in, we'd love to hear your questions! Simply include the #EGUchat hashtag in your tweet! 
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What can corals can tell us about past climate change?

Reconstructing past climates is a tricky task at the best of times.

It requires an ample data set and a good understanding of proxies. Add into the mix some underwater fieldwork and the challenge got a whole lot harder!

In today’s Imaggeo on Monday’s post, Isaac Kerlow explains how information locked in corals can tell the story of past climates and how important it is, not only to carry out the research, but to communicate the results to the public!

If you stick with this post until the end you’ll be rewarded with a super informative video too: egu.eu/1P03AL

#EGUblogs #corals #climateofthepast #climatechange
Reconstructing past climates is a tricky task at the best of times. It requires an ample data set and a good understanding of proxies. Add into the mix some underwater fieldwork and the challenge got a whole lot harder! In today’s Imaggeo on Monday’s post, Isaac Kerlow explains how information locked...
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EGU's official Google+ page
Introduction

The European Geosciences Union (EGU, www.egu.eu) is Europe’s premier geosciences union, dedicated to the pursuit of excellence in the Earth, planetary and space sciences for the benefit of humanity, worldwide. It was established in September 2002 as a merger of the European Geophysical Society (EGS) and the European Union of Geosciences (EUG), and has headquarters in Munich, Germany. 

It is a non-profit international union of scientists with over 12,000 members from all over the world. Membership is open to individuals who are professionally engaged in or associated with geosciences and planetary and space sciences and related studies, including students and retired seniors.

The EGU has a current portfolio of 17 diverse scientific journals, which use an innovative open access format, and organises a number of topical meetings, and education and outreach activities. Its annual General Assembly is the largest and most prominent European geosciences event, attracting over 12,000 scientists from all over the world. The meeting’s sessions cover a wide range of topics, including volcanology, planetary exploration, the Earth’s internal structure and atmosphere, climate, as well as energy and resources.

Contact Information
Contact info
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+49-89-2180-6703
Email
Address
Laura Roberts (EGU Communications Officer) EGU Executive Office Luisenstrasse 37 80333 Munich Germany