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Communicate your Science Video Competition finalists: time to get voting!

For the second year in a row we’re running the EGU Communicate Your Science Video Competition – the aim being for young scientists to communicate their research in a short, sweet and public-friendly video. Our judges have now selected 3 fantastic finalists from the excellent entries we received this year and it’s time to find the best geoscience communication clip!

The shortlisted videos will be open to a public vote from now until midnight on 16 Apri; – just ‘like’ the video on YouTube to give it your seal of approval. The video with the most likes when voting closes will be awarded a free registration to the EGU General Assembly 2016.

To find out more, head over to the ‪#‎EGUBlogs‬: egu.eu/9OFX6V

To view the finalist videos head over to our YouTube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/watch

‪#‎scicomm‬ ‪#‎videocompetition‬ ‪#‎outreach‬ ‪#‎floods‬ ‪#‎glaciers‬ ‪#‎mystery‬
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Looking for a job in the geosciences? Visit the job spot at EGU 2015!

The General Assembly can be an excellent source of information for those looking for jobs or doctoral positions. The Job Spot, is located in the EGU and Friends area, next to the EGU Booth (Hall X, Blue Level) has a searching station linked to the EGU jobs portal, so you can find the latest vacancies and who’s providing them. Check the session programme and see if they’re here too – what better place to meet them than at the biggest geosciences event in Europe?!

There are notice boards nearby, so you can put up your CV to let employers know you’re available too.

Employers may submit their job announcements free of charge online or by using the computer available at the General Assembly Job Spot.

To learn more head over to the ‪#‎EGUBlogs‬: egu.eu/4VRAJW
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EGU 2015: Get the Assembly mobile app!

The EGU 2015 mobile app is now available for iPhones and Android smartphones. To download it, you can scan the QR code available at the General Assembly website or go directly to http://app.egu2015.eu on your mobile device. You will be directed to the version of the EGU 2015 app for your particular smartphone, which you can download for free.

Additionally, this blog post on the ‪#‎EGUBlogs‬ has a step-by-step guide of how you can use the mobile app: egu.eu/619FJ5

‪#‎EGU2015‬ ‪#‎conference‬ ‪#‎mobileapp‬
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Did you watch the solar eclipse on Friday?

It was visible from much northern Europe, starting in the North Atlantic and then sweeping up into the Arctic, ending at the North Pole.

Stunning pictures, videos and time lapse videos have flooded the internet, so in case you missed it, here are some places you can catch the action:

New Scientist: egu.eu/9L4OZX
BBC Science: egu.eu/11LE3U
BBC Timelapse video: egu.eu/5KW18R
The Guardian: egu.eu/8C41Z3

‪#‎solareclipse‬
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Short courses at ‪#‎EGU15‬!

This year there are more short courses than ever to choose from at the General Assembly. You can supercharge your scientific skills, broaden your base in science communication and pick up tips on how to boost your career – be it in academia or outside. We've put together a small selection of what’s in store at over on the ‪#‎EGUBlogs‬: egu.eu/7IDXBJ

The list, which is by no means comprehensive, offers a few highlights of things that might be of interest. Check out the full session programme, for a complete list of short courses available, on the General Assembly website.

‪#‎jobs‬ ‪#‎career‬ ‪#‎data‬ ‪#‎skills‬ ‪#‎knowledge‬
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Are you presenting at #EGU2015?
If so, we've put together this quick guide with the main things you ought to now when preparing your presnetation, whether it be an oral, poster or PICO!

Here are a few key pointers:

ORALS - All oral presentations should have the dimensions 4:3 and last about 12 minutes, with 3 minutes for questions.

POSTERS - Poster boards landscape and are 197 cm by 100 cm. Posters should be hung between 08:00 and 09:00 on the day of your scheduled poster presentation. All the materials you'll need to hang your poster will be available on the day in the poster halls.

PICO - combining the best of oral and poster presentations. Every PICO author presents their slides in a “2 minutes madness”. There is time after all the presentations to rewatch the slides (via interactive screens) and engage in discussion with the presenter.

You can find plenty more details and a few tips and hints over on the #EGUBlogs: egu.eu/7LD08H
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When an Antarctic iceberg the size of a country breaks away, what happens next?

Most icebergs, or at least the ones that are likely to cause any problems to shipping routes, are small, but every now and then you might come across a giant. What is a giant in iceberg terms? Think 100m high (above the sea, they might be several hundred below water!) and potentially tens of km long!

What happens to these giant icebergs, known as tabular icebergs, when they break-off from the continent? Well, unlike what you might think, they initially have a hard time making it to open waters and spend some time in shallow waters close to the coast. They eventually manage to drift away, creating their own habitat by cooling the seas and bringing fresh water too. They also stimulate the growth of algae and plankton, as they bring nutrients with them in the form of iron. As they reach deeper waters, the icebergs tend to breakup into smaller and smaller pieces until eventually little is left of the original giant.

Want to learn more about how tabular icebergs are formed and their fate during their life time? Head over to The Conversation UK and find out more in this article by Mark Brandon (Reader in Polar Oceanography at The Open University). egu.eu/5MID7R

‪#‎icebergs‬ ‪#‎giants‬ ‪#‎life‬ ‪#‎breaking‬
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From News from Science: 230 million years ago, one of Earth’s top predators was a salamanderlike amphibian that was more than 2 meters long, weighed as much as 100 kilograms, and had a broad flat head the size and shape of a toilet seat.

You can find more about this fascinating creature here: egu.eu/0KWYO7

#fossils #salamander #amphibian  
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The past two weeks has seen the I'm a Geoscientist competition take place.

Over this period a staggering 201 students have had the opportunity too learn about the Earth, planetary and ocean science through talking to our 5 geoscientists. With over 260 questions answered and 20, very hectic, live chats our 5 participating geoscientists took the chance to enthuse school children about all things geoscience!

Rhian Meara, a geology lecturer in Swansea in the UK and Andi Rudersdor, a PhD candidate in neotectonics at RWTH Aachen University, were this years finalists. After an intense final, 3 hour long chat, open to all the participating school, Andi was crowned the winner of this year's I'm a Geoscientists.

"The last two weeks have been amazing. Being able to take part in the 2015 zone of “I’m a Geoscientist” felt great", says Andi. As a geoscientists, Andi feels it is part of his role to pass on his knowledge, as he explains "Communicating science to the broad public and especially to future generations is one of the big tasks every scientist should feel called to. And being engaged in this dynamic online competition makes this important task funny and laid-back."

If Andi' success has inspired you, or you simply want to learn more you can follow these links where you'll b able to find out more information:
Andi's full thank you message: egu.eu/8S53QJ
I'm a geoscientist: http://imageoscientist.eu/
Information for teachers: http://imageoscientist.eu/teachers/
Information for scientists: http://imageoscientist.eu/geoscientists/
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This Monday's Imaggeo image is impressive! Some recently (in geological terms that is) formed aeolianite fossil dunes.

What are aeolianite fossil dunes in any case? Originally a soft accumulation of sand grains, shaped by the wind into large mounds and ridges, the dunes eventually turn into rock. As the sediments compact under their own pressure and expel any moisture and fluids retained within them, they become lithified and become the structure seen in this week’s image.

This particular example is located in Almeria, the eastern most province of Andalucia, located in South East Spain. Almeria province is geologically very interesting as the relationships between tectonics, sedimentary geology and geomorphology are evident throughout the landscape.

To learn more about the fossil dunes and the geology of the region, head over to the ‪#‎EGUblogs‬! You can learn about the fossils which make up this dune: egu.eu/91LN56
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A large solar flare,  lead to the ejection of a Coronal Mass Ejection (CME) from the Sun. 'The CME originated from close to the centre of the solar disc on 15th March', says the British Geological Survey (BGS).

When a CME hits the Earth, it lead to a geomagnetic storm, as the Earth's magnetosphere is disturbed by the incoming solar particles. The outcome, provided all the conditions are right, is the appearance of aurora in the night sky.

Coinciding with St. Patrick's Day, the sky turned green with the aurora put on a spectacular show last night, even at lower than usual latitudes, as a result of the severity of the storm. Aurora were visible in both the northern and southern hemisphere, from New Zealand, to the USA and throughout northern Europe.

You can learn more about the geomagnetic storm from the BGS website here: egu.eu/5461Z8

If you'd like to see some stunning aurora photographs you can follow these links:
BBC Website: egu.eu/1KA6WS
The Guardian Science: egu.eu/4NTW2I Space.com: egu.eu/3VWSA8

‪#‎aurora‬ ‪#‎spacweather‬ ‪#‎geomgneticstorm‬ ‪#‎sun‬ ‪#‎CME‬ ‪#‎solarflare‬
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The inner structure of our planet has long been probed using the signals from earthquakes. Researchers have now used the earthquake signals to create this beautiful, marble like model of the Earth.

In the figure shown here, the slower travelling seismic waves are in red and orange. Faster vibrations, in green and blue. Viscous materials, sticky and gooey, like the mantle slow seismic waves down, whilst the green and blue colours correspond to areas were the waves can travel faster, such as through rocks. In this image it is likely that the green and blues correlate with subduction zones.

The image here is only of a relatively small area, the region below the Pacific Ocean. The scientists working on this project are hoping to image the whole of the mantle by the end of the year, so stay tuned for a more detailed and extensive 3D map of the mantle!

To read more on this story follow this link: egu.eu/9PX3A0

‪#‎mantle‬ ‪#‎earthquake‬ ‪#‎structure‬ ‪#‎3D‬ ‪#‎seismic‬ ‪#‎waves‬
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This velocity "cube" of earth is incredible. 
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Laura Roberts (EGU Communications Officer) EGU Executive Office Luisenstrasse 37 80333 Munich Germany
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Introduction

The European Geosciences Union (EGU, www.egu.eu) is Europe’s premier geosciences union, dedicated to the pursuit of excellence in the geosciences and the planetary and space sciences for the benefit of humanity, worldwide. It was established in September 2002 as a merger of the European Geophysical Society (EGS) and the European Union of Geosciences (EUG), and has headquarters in Munich, Germany. 

It is a non-profit international union of scientists with over 11,000 members from all over the world. Membership is open to individuals who are professionally engaged in or associated with geosciences and planetary and space sciences and related studies, including students and retired seniors.

The EGU has a current portfolio of 16 diverse scientific journals, which use an innovative open access format, and organises a number of topical meetings, and education and outreach activities. Its annual General Assembly is the largest and most prominent European geosciences event, attracting over 11,000 scientists from all over the world. The meeting’s sessions cover a wide range of topics, including volcanology, planetary exploration, the Earth’s internal structure and atmosphere, climate, as well as energy and resources.