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Introducing a powerful new tool to help stop the California virtual currency license.
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Scott Dunn's profile photoTed Murray's profile photoIvan Pierre's profile photoStephen Wood's profile photo
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Digital rights groups team up with tech companies to fight California's misguided virtual currency license.
A coalition of nonprofit advocacy organizations and virtual currency companies published a letter today calling on the California legislature to reject A.B. 1326 unless important fixes were made to the bill. A.B. 1326 would create a license for virtual currency businesses in California. The 17 organizations include nonprofit advocacy groups such as the Electronic Frontier Foundation, Fight for the Future, the Internet Archive, and the Free Softwa...
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Charlie Ebert's profile photoTed Murray's profile photo
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This weekend, thousands of Malaysians are expected to join mass demonstrations calling for the resignation of the Prime Minister over allegations of corruption. The PM's response?  Censoring the Web.
This weekend, tens of thousands of ordinary Malaysians will flood into the cities of Kuala Lumpur, Kota Kinabalu and Kuching, with satellite events held in solidarity around the world, to call for the resignation of Prime Minister Najib Razak.
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Court stumbles in fair use analysis of broadcast archiving service used by journalists, scholars, and political campaigns. Read our deep dive into yesterday's decision in the TVEyes case. 
A great decision on the fair use of radio and TV excerpts has been followed up by a troubling one that walks back some of the protections for new and innovative uses of media. Two years ago, Fox News sued a company called TVEyes, which creates a text-searchable database of broadcast content from thousands of television and radio stations in the United States and worldwide. It’s used by journalists, scholars, and political campaigns to study and m...
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Here's what you need to know about AB 1326, California's virtual currency license.
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George Bullis's profile photoT FlashPoint Szerlong's profile photochuck grinnell's profile photoTed Murray's profile photo
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Hey!  I have an idea!  Let's have the government run or dictate healthcare!  Oh, wait!  Why anyone trusts government bureaucrats to do anything that requires brains and/or effort is beyond me. 
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Three years later after the feds seized Megaupload's servers, users still can’t access their data. Here’s our latest brief on behalf of a sports videographer who just wants his files back. 
Three years ago now, EFF’s client Kyle Goodwin, a sports videographer, asked the court to allow him to retrieve the files he stored in an account on the cloud storage site Megaupload. When the government seized Megaupload’s assets and servers in January 2012, Mr. Goodwin lost access to video files containing months of his professional work.
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Kerry Amburgy-Dickson (Kalex)'s profile photoLarry Lopez's profile photo18 Rabbit's profile photoMichelle BarlondSmith's profile photo
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+Scott Foust​​​​​
Drive & Dropbox both offer automatic synchronization between accounts using their app. I think Amazon does too. Drive practically begs for access to your Dropbox account.

+Brian Holt Hawthorne​​​​
Running the sync app for both accounts would work, but that's a tremendous waste of last-mile bandwidth.

+Steve Schwartz​​​​​ & +Frank Severino​​​​​ & +Shawn H Corey​​​​​ have the right idea:

Encrypt the data yourself & if you can't afford to operate your own offsite storage, rent remote server access.

That way you get remote accessible offsite storage, plus the added capability of running server/desktop apps & other services remotely.

Some DNS or web-hosting plans offer server storage with rates that are very competitive with "cloud" storage fees.

If your media is of interest to anyone else, you can let peer-to-peer networks host it for you. When the old 250gb hard drive storing my comprehensive Star Trek collection failed, it took only 5 days to download all 200gb from the torrent I had uploaded to the mainline (public) DHT. 200gb stored for two years... for free... What's that cost on Dropbox if you don't have a Facebook account to spam people with?

"Real men don't make backups; They upload it via FTP & let the world mirror it for them." - Linus Torvalds
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Have them in circles
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HTTPS encryption may have gotten the better of Russian censors trying to block a Wikipedia article.
Dueling forces of encryption and government censorship came to a head in Russia this week in the form of an order to block Wikipedia. One Wikipedia article in particular (about charas hashish) was deemed to run afoul of the country's restrictions on content related to drugs.
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Carlisle Childress's profile photoEmmanuel Taban's profile photoDanny ter Haar's profile photoDavid Ormeño's profile photo
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+Alex Emelianov Don't they already have one? If not, I can hear the NSA whispering, "Pass it!"
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Governments are meeting behind closed doors to make rules for the Internet in the Trade in Services Agreement (TISA). When almost the same thing happened three years ago, tech companies and users banded together to oppose it, but now some of those same companies are on the inside, leaving users isolated.
The stash of previously-secret correspondence about the Trade In Services Agreement (TISA) that EFF obtained and published this week speaks volumes about the extent to which technology companies such as IBM and Google, and trade lobby groups such as the Computer and Communications Industry Association (CCIA) and Internet Digital Economy Alliance (IDEA), have bought into the dangerous idea that trade agreements should be used to govern the
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Matthew Curry's profile photochuck grinnell's profile photoRon Bailey's profile photoTed Murray's profile photo
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+James Mason but then it would just get bogged down trying to weed out all the paranoids who think the government is out to get them from all the paranoids who the government actually is out to get. Nothing gets done and the pigs continue sleep in beds without sheets. 
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Following a ruling last year by the Supreme Court, most courts have embraced efficiency in invalidating abstract patents. But the Eastern District of Texas, the country's most popular court for patent trolls, has not. A recent Kafkaesque order illustrates the costs this imposes on those fighting back against trolls. 
In the wake of the Supreme Court’s June 2014 decision in Alice v. CLS Bank, most courts have been quickly and efficiently getting rid of patents that improperly claim “abstract ideas.” In Alice, the Supreme Court held that “abstract ideas,” without more, were unpatentable under 35 U.S.C. § 101.
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Darrell Ames's profile photoRam Ojandia's profile photoDarlene Wallach's profile photochuck grinnell's profile photo
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+Prophet Zarquon That'll never happen because those that profit have the power to continue to profit. 
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Twitter has cut off transparency orgs from tracking tweets that politicians delete. Here's why that's so disappointing.
Accountability projects that track deleted tweets from politicians and public officials suffered a critical setback this week when Twitter killed their ability to collect that information. This move comes a few months after the service shut down the U.S.
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Steven Hess's profile photoTed Murray's profile photoKerry Amburgy-Dickson (Kalex)'s profile photoBen O'Sullivan's profile photo
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What's next? Are they going to try and remove seeing those tweets from our memories. Sorry but it will never happen. What someone says can't be taken back. No matter how hard they try. The public has already seen it. If they don't want something talked about, then they need to not say it in the first place. This is how the rumor mills get started, which in my opinion are far more devastating than explaining something that was said previously. If its their choice.. Let the twisting of the facts begin. 
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Ashley Madison's abuse of copyright law to try to put the genie back in the bottle is both doomed and dangerous.
Copyright is a poor tool for making embarrassing information disappear from the Internet. It rarely succeeds, and often draws more attention to whatever was embarrassing or harmful. Copyright isn’t designed for keeping secrets (in fact, it was generally meant to do the exact opposite by encouraging disclosure). Yet people keep trying to use copyright law, in part because takedown notices under the Digital Millennium Copyright Act are quick and ea...
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Jon Gorrono's profile photoArioch The's profile photoTed Murray's profile photoJon Enerson's profile photo
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DMCA sucks! There's something wrong with our copyright law itself.
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Google ordered to remove links to stories about Google being ordered to remove links under "right to be forgotten."
Google faces fines from the UK's ICO if it does not comply with ridiculous recursion.
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JR Fontaine's profile photoJeremy Pullicino's profile photoCaleb Durenberger's profile photoFrosch Polster's profile photo
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+Prophet Zarquon - Twitter, cutting off services that backup "deleted" tweets, needs to learn the same lesson...
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Have them in circles
2,221,478 people
王腾宇's profile photo
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Defending your civil liberties in a digital world.
Introduction
From the Internet to the iPod, technologies are transforming our society and empowering us as speakers, citizens, creators, and consumers. When our freedoms in the networked world come under attack, the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) is the first line of defense. EFF broke new ground when it was founded in 1990—well before the Internet was on most people's radar—and continues to confront cutting-edge issues defending free speech, privacy, innovation, and consumer rights today. From the beginning, EFF has championed the public interest in every critical battle affecting digital rights.

Blending the expertise of lawyers, policy analysts, activists, and technologists, EFF achieves significant victories on behalf of consumers and the general public. EFF fights for freedom primarily in the courts, bringing and defending lawsuits even when that means taking on the US government or large corporations. By mobilizing more than 150,000 concerned citizens through our Action Center, EFF beats back bad legislation. In addition to advising policymakers, EFF educates the press and public.

EFF is a donor-funded nonprofit and depends on your support to continue successfully defending your digital rights. Litigation is particularly expensive; because two-thirds of our budget comes from individual donors, every contribution is critical to helping EFF fight—and win—more cases.