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dawn ahukanna
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dawn ahukanna

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People have always traded in trust, except the scope was local. With machine learning and trained-AI (not self learning, yet) this meta-data is now available and digitised, just like our finger prints, faces, gait, etc.
Soon, no longer need to be a carbon-based human to understand, codify and advance on trust. Silicon- or graphene-based chips, will do as well, if not better.

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The Trust Economy

"Trust may soon be a commodity that consumers not only want from the brands with which they interact, but demand to know about other people."

Find out how trust really works: http://goo.gl/e6gm60
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Sunday science read.
 
SciTech #ScienceSunday Digest - 17/2016.
Permalink here: http://www.scitechdigest.net/2016/04/engineered-artificial-ribosomes.html

Engineered artificial ribosomes, Tantalising EmDrive, Nanomagnet Holograph displays, Hafnium oxide memristors, Rejuvenation genetherapy confirmed, Improved CRISPR, Seawater uranium extraction, Implantable ultrasound communications, Biomimicry brighter LEDs, Actin memory role.

1. Artificial Synthetic Ribosome
Ribosomes in cells take in genetic code and sequentially synthesise a complete protein from specific amino acids that correspond to that code. A new, autonomous molecular machine based DNA has been developed as an artificial synthetic ribosome able to take specific sequence instructions and make new synthetic polymer materials out of different molecules in a similar way http://www.rsc.org/chemistryworld/2016/04/ribosome-mimic-dna-molecular-machine-polymer-production. The full paper is also worth a look http://sci-hub.io/10.1038/nchem.2495. The system relies on (i) chemistry DNA hairpin sequences attached to specific reactant molecules, and (ii) instruction DNA hairpin molecules with sequences that control the order in which the different monomer reactant molecules are assembled. Autonomous, programmable, atomically precise synthesis of large molecules. In related news another engineered ribosome functions in bacteria to create proteins with beta-amino acids that has never been achieved in live cells before http://news.yale.edu/2016/04/21/new-protein-making-factory-promises-better-medicines.

2. EmDrive and Unruh Radiation
To date six independent experiments have replicated the original EmDrive results by building their own device and measuring a thrust from a hollow cone when microwaves are bounced inside it, all without a suitable explanation for a seeming violation of conservation of momentum. A new theory of inertia suggests inertia is the pressure Unruh radiation exerts on an accelerating body, an effect predicted by General Relativity, and which also explains the acceleration discrepanies in falyby anomalies https://www.technologyreview.com/s/601299/the-curious-link-between-the-fly-by-anomaly-and-the-impossible-emdrive-thruster/. The theory suggests inertia is quantised, predicts flyby anomalies and their discrepancy, predicts the magnitude of thrusts measured in all experiments done so far, and makes two predictions yet to be tested: (i) a dielectric in the cavity will enhance thrust, and (ii) changing cavity dimensions will reverse thrust. It also assumes photons have inertial mass and the speed of light changes in the cavity. Will be interesting to see where this goes.

3. Nanomagnet Pixels for Holographic Displays
Wide-angle 3D holographic displays have been developed that are powered by nanomagnets http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2016-04/tuot-npt041916.php. The nanomagnets in these displays are referred to as magneto-optic spatial light modulators; a laser focused on the surface defines the display pixel size, pixel switching occurs in 10 nanoseconds, with pixel size and pitch in this demonstration being 1 micrometer, and enabling a 30 degree viewing angle. A nice advance in spatial light modulators towards the goal of glasses-free holographic video displays.

4. Hafnium Oxide Memristors as Synapses
New memristors made of thin-film hafnium oxide and via conventional production processes show promise as artificial synapses in brain-like chips http://phys.org/news/2016-04-physicists-electronic-synapses-neural-networks.html. Demonstrations show the memristors reproducing electrical signalling behaviour as observed in biological synapses, including spike-timing-dependent plasticity, long-term potentiation, and long-term depression. Next step will be to incorporate these hardware prototypes into larger brain-like chips.

5. Rejuvenation Gene Therapy Confirmed Against Aging
BioViva has confirmed Liz Parish’s experimental gene therapy, undertaken last year for disabling myostatin and extending teleomeres, successfully extended the telomeres of the cells that were analysed (white blood cells) from 6.71kb to 7.33kb and so effectively removing an average of 20 years worth of telomere shortening http://bioviva-science.com/2016/04/21/first-gene-therapy-successful-against-human-aging/. As always an N=1 should be taken with a grain of salt; the company has received an injection of funding and repeatability will be key in convincing skeptics of the result. The same techniques could be used to target the Per2 gene, leading to rejuvenation of the mammalian immune system and prolonged lifespans http://www.alphagalileo.org/ViewItem.aspx?ItemId=163209&CultureCode=en.

6. Single DNA Base Read/Writes Via CRISPR
A newly developed version of CRISPR can be targeted to specific sites in the genome and instead of cutting the DNA, precisely change one DNA base for another in order to correct precise single-base mutations or misspellings https://www.statnews.com/2016/04/20/clever-crispr-advance-unveiled/. This again reduces the risk of off-site target effects and provides an elegant way to make edits, provided the group can further improve the tool to be capable of all 12 basepair swaps (currently does 2). A protein nanopore array has been used for real-time single-base electronic DNA sequencing http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2016-04/cuso-cet042116.php. The nanopores incorporate a DNA polymerase protein that synthesises a complementary DNA strand as the strand of interest is passed through the pore; each of the four different nucleotides added incorporates a distinct tag that facilitates clearer and more accurate electrical signals that allow the sequence to be reconstructed.

7. Improvements in Extracting Uranium from Seawater
There are lots of efforts to extract useful elements from seawater with Uranium being of particular interest given the oceans collectively hold 4 billion tons of Uranium. Significant advances are being made with seawater extraction of Uranium via novel adsorbent materials that can now achieve 5.2 grams of Uranium per kilogram of adsorbent after 49 days in seawater, and with more recent tests showing 6 grams after 56 days https://www.ornl.gov/news/advances-extracting-uranium-seawater-announced-special-issue. There would be many benefits to achieving economical Uranium (and other metals) extraction from seawater.

8. Ultrasonic Data Transmission Through Flesh
Ultrasonic signals can now be used to transmit data through meat at 30 mbps, enough for HD video http://spectrum.ieee.org/tech-talk/biomedical/devices/ultrasonic-signals-transmit-data-through-meat-at-hd-video-quality. Current implanted medical devices are usually limited to much lower data rates, but having wireless data transmission via ultrasound able to deliver HD video offers a number of benefits including live-streaming video from swallowed camera-pills, easily managing large firmware updates to implanted devices, and others. Next step is animal studies and confirmation of the effect of bone structures on data rates.

9. Biomimicry for Brighter LEDs
The amount of light emitted by LEDs was boosted by 60% by carefully shaping the outer surface of the LED to mimic the structure of a firefly’s lantern http://gizmodo.com/scientists-made-leds-60-percent-brighter-by-copying-fir-1771979185. This essentially amounts to forming a nanostructured lens on top of the LED and these structures reduce the difference in refractive index between the material body and air, allowing more light to be emitted. This opens up the possibility for more power-efficient LEDs, but I’m also wondering if they can flip it and improve the efficiency of photodetectors and photovoltaics?

10. The Role of Actin in Memory
New models suggest that actin, the protein that helps to control cell shape, is responsible for the formation of long-term memories http://news.rice.edu/2016/04/18/thanks-actin-for-the-memories/. This concerns studies of the energy landscape of proteins and how actin filaments pull upon and stabilise certain proteins to form longer, more stable, and insoluble prion-like fibers. This offers another piece of evidence for the biological role of prion-like proteins, and also suggests a healthy role for some types of protein aggregates in cells, which are often considered a sign of disease and malfunction. This provides a mechanism for synaptic structures to last many years, if not decades, although the transition from short-term memory to this form of long-term memory is not yet known.

SciTech Tip Jar: http://www.scitechdigest.net/p/donate.html 
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dawn ahukanna

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... On really old tech called "paper".
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Duh!
 
India April 2016
Energy minister says power realities are changing fast, predicting a fast uptake in solar energy despite concerns over baseload and storage
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Reading, writing, and math are no longer the only essential subjects everyone should learn. Today’s essential skills include navigating the web, writing code, and engaging with others online. This web literacy map from Mozilla presents activities that cover these 21st-century skills.
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dawn ahukanna

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Sunday read - have you got the power?
 
Brainz…

When I was at school and about 13 or 14 something terrifying happened to me. My biology teacher told me, quite convincingly, that the brain we had inside our heads peaks at 20 and after that it begins to lose brain cells, shrink as we age, consigning us, as a species into a long, gradual decline into imbecility which, however, we are too dumb by then to even spot.

The idea that I had maybe just a handful of years to reach my full mental potential and make my mark upon the world galvanized me into squeezing every possible second out of the day. I experimented with sleeping just six out of the seven nights of the week (arguing with myself that the number of hours of sleep I needed on average was being fulfilled - on average). I became addicted to coffee which enabled me to feel my brain coming alive with a newfound stimulus and I found myself burning a slow, steady anger towards nature’s perceived unfairness that would give us lives way longer than our best mental peak.

Thankfully my biology teacher who, was most probably working with the best medical knowledge and theories we had at the time, was wrong: (https://goo.gl/kXoYxy). Even more thankfully my coffee drinking habits and battles to fight the need for sleep prepared me for the digital age ahead of those of my generation.

We live in times when something extraordinary has happened. The secret world of the brain is being made visible without having to resort to crude methods like craniotomies and electrodes (http://goo.gl/f7WvkC) and the brain as neuroscientist, Christopher deCharms, says is revealing itself to us and, even more importantly, allows us to learn how to control it better. When we can control our brain, we can control our pain (https://goo.gl/49Tw8W) he says and that in itself is an important development.

If our brains evolved to control movement (https://goo.gl/it8PnQ). The one way we have of controlling the world around us. Controlling our sense of pain allows us to unfurl dimensions of interaction that go beyond our sense of comfort and discomfort. Suddenly of all the living things on planet earth we become something more. Something greater. Capable of rewiring ourselves: https://goo.gl/XOo1h0. Producing a better version of who we are because we can rewrite our own mental code.

Surprisingly (or perhaps not so surprising) what we are learning now about the brain suggests that the tightly-knit communities of the past which venerated age as wisdom and used it as a valuable resource for the tribe may not have been wrong after all: http://goo.gl/r5w7pv.

Our brains, used now as a model for machine learning to program neural nets to function a little like us, are revealing themselves not just for what they can learn but also what they unlearn as they do so: http://goo.gl/FGDy0Q.

Our brains use an internal language we have yet to crack, to decide just how to decode what we perceive: http://goo.gl/b0mU3S. There is a strong sense that we use our brains not just to understand the world and control our environment but also to control ourselves at a deep, cognitive level: http://goo.gl/jRzmWn and the ability of the brain to do that, apparently, does not depend directly on size as much as may think it does: http://goo.gl/iU9rCd.

As we look at the world through an increased understanding of the mechanics of the governor behind our eyes, two things begin to happen. First, we begin to better understand and then scientifically codify our own behavior: http://goo.gl/iLZnSa, especially in the digital age. And then we begin to understand that the consciousness we feel, the ability we have to impose a complex metalayer of meaning upon the world we belong to, is itself an emergent phenomenon arising out of the complex organization of information: https://goo.gl/B4yz5o (link courtesy of +Ron Serina).

For the first time ever, any of us, can understand the software that runs inside our heads (https://goo.gl/HByJH) and, at the same time rewire the hardware itruns on. This makes us, impossibly enough, responsible for our own creation. Descartes’ existential assertion based upon his perception of cognitive awareness: https://goo.gl/QGAu0q is now not only not quite as far-fetched but also can be taken one step further: We are what we think. Or rather we are how we think.

And that is actually pretty terrifying as a thought because it lays upon our feet the responsibility for everything we see: the faults and miracles of our world. Its insanity and its wonders. Its stupidity and brilliance. We are responsible for the sense of us: http://goo.gl/ed7F4d. And that means that for whatever we perceive as being broken we are responsible for finding a solution to fix it.

All that requires, of course, plenty of coffee and a little bit of sugar. Some croissants and a donut or two, Cookies and some chocolate cake, pleasures which, apparently can only be experienced by a conscious brain (http://goo.gl/asW4H4). Have an awesome Sunday wherever you are.

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Applies to learning any life skill. Humans are not "cookie-cut"!
 
Students need different kinds of stimulation, and they should seek opportunities they’re interested in because no one thing is going to be the winning formula for everyone.
When you want to improve your physical health, you don’t have to eat one specific type of food or exercise in a specific way. Rather, you need an appropriate mix of healthy foods and exercise -- no one thing is required. Different types of exercise and foods are in some sense interchangeable. What matters is that you get the appropriate dose. Could this common idea from health translate into the world of education?
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Applies to design of all kinds. As you say, "Humans are not cookie-cut."!!!
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dawn ahukanna

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Cut out unproductive meetings.
 
Be more focused, have fewer meetings—and then go home early. It sounds like a dream, but it can work.
Be more focused, have fewer meetingsand then go home early. It sounds like a dream, but it can work.
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How Swede it is!
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All essentials taken care of.
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"Are you labeled groceries?" - DWL
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They are not the only ones! What about the languages that use "half" backwards e.g.
One, Two, Three, Four, Half of Ten - Wait, What???
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All I'm thinking is "what if the motor breaks down?"
Ha ha ha ha.

Via +Visnja Zeljeznjak
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Software Alchemist - Turning base code into precious applications. Devsigner == 'Dev'eveloper + De'signer'
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