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dawn ahukanna
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dawn ahukanna

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Google tip for the day, via +George Station.
 
Check your Google storage!

You have 15 GB of free storage to share across Google Drive, Gmail, and Google+ Photos.

If you use Google Apps at work or school, you have at least 30 GB of storage.
While you may have a lot of files and folders in your Google Drive, only items that you've synced or uploaded use storage space.

Google Docs, Sheets, or Slides or items shared with you don’t count toward your storage space.


Items that count toward your storage limit

➤ Gmail: All the messages and attachments in your mail, including those in your Spam and Trash folders.

➤ Drive: Files you’ve stored in Drive, like PDFs, images, and videos. Anything you’ve made with Google Docs, Sheets, and Slides won’t count toward your storage limit.

➤ Google+ Photos: Only photos over 2048x2048 pixels and videos longer than 15 minutes count toward your storage limit.

If you exceed your storage limit, you'll receive warnings and you'll need to free up storage as soon as you can. Otherwise, you won’t be able to sync or upload additional items to your Drive or add photos to Google+.
After a period of time, incoming messages to your Gmail account will be returned to the sender and you won’t be able to send new messages.

TIP: Photos posted from mobile to Hangouts chat are full size.

At the moment there is no way to check photos by size on Google+ but here's a workaround:

The only way I know to do this is via the search tool in Picasaweb. 

Start here at https://picasaweb.google.com/lh/myphotos?noredirect=1

Click the search button (no need to add any search term)

Click the 'Extra large photos' option ( you will see this option on the left hand side of the screen)

Select the 'My photos' from the search drop down menu (via the search box, top right hand corner of the screen)

This should display a selection or large photos stored in your account ....I know this only allows single photo selections but it's a start.


Check your storage: Hover your mouse over the pie chart to get the pop-up.
https://www.google.com/settings/storage

Read more about the storage from Google:
https://support.google.com/drive/answer/6558

How to delete your photos and videos on Google+:
https://support.google.com/plus/answer/1304803

#Photos     #Storage     #Picasaweb   #GoogleDrive     #TCpost  
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+Bill Graham get well soon. 
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Design spaces for people to flourish.
 
Steve Jobs designed the Pixar building with the bathrooms in the center. Fisher-Price has a dedicated space, the Cave, where designers, engineers, and marketers meet to build prototypes of toys from foam, cardboard, glue, and acrylic paint. And Google allows its software engineers, the core of its intellectual capital, to design their own desks and write on the walls. These companies understand how space impacts communication, innovation, and productivity.
Innovative thinkers need diverse workspaces to help them bring out their very best. So what can you do to shape your own physical workspace?
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+David Renaud, none taken.

Everything we experience through our senses, feeds our subconscious mental models and emotional associations.
If the "creative space" only inspires and stimulates the opposite of the desired effect, that affects the bottom line for a business.

That short-term decision does not make sense for a business, that should be sustainable and profitable i.e.
For people to be able to buy what you sell:
1. They must desire your product.
2. They must be able to use your product to do something they want to do.
3. They must be able to afford to buy your product i.e. Have disposable income.

For profits and sustainability:
The product must be sell at higher than cost price at a certain volume.

In my opinion, the market (your customers, not some inanimate object), is moving from industrial push to customer experience pull.

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Constructors standings.
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Malaysian 2015 F1 grand prix results.
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Sunday science read.
 
SciTech #ScienceSunday Digest - 13/2015.
Permalink here: http://www.scitechdigest.net/2015/03/nanoparticles-stimulating-neurons.html

Nanoparticles stimulating neurons, Nanotubes stimulating neurons, Bioprocessing aptamer hydrogels, Controlling circadian rhythms, Making CRISPR better, DNA nanofabrication, Festo’s insect robots, Magnetic heat & sound, Nanolasers & photonic guides, Plasma shielding. 

1. Stimulating Neurons with Gold Nanoparticles.
A promising new technique for precisely stimulating neurons has been developed that involves coupling gold nanoparticles to other molecules that specifically bind to neuronal sodium channels without blocking them http://news.uchicago.edu/article/2015/03/12/new-technique-uses-light-take-genetics-out-optogenetics. When irradiated with light of a specific wavelength the gold nanoparticles heat up and this causes the channels to open up and initiate a signalling cascade; antibodies were also used to bind the particles to different neuronal channels. The particles also remained bound to the cell surface and the neurons didn’t suffer reduced signalling efficacy after prolonged and repeated artificial activation. Referred to as optogenetics without the genetics, future applications might include artificial vision restoration. A very flexible platform with different nanoparticles perhaps responding to different wavelengths of light and so potentially allowing simultaneous addressable signals; I wonder if they can signal output in a similar fashion too? Other nanoparticles sensitive to radio waves have also been shown to open up the blood brain barrier http://www.nouvelles.umontreal.ca/udem-news/news/20150325-nanorobotic-agents-open-the-blood-brain-barrier-offering-hope-for-new-brain-treatments.html

2. Carbon Nanotube Fibers Interface with the Brain.
In related neuronal stimulation news, carbon nanotube fibers have been developed that allow for intimate two-way brain stimulation and measurement and have proven superior to metal electrodes http://news.rice.edu/2015/03/25/carbon-nanotube-fibers-make-superior-links-to-brain-2/. The fibers measure one quarter the width of a human hair, terminate at a functional tip about the width of a neuron, and are made by wet-spinning millions of carbon nanotubes together. The strength and conductivity of the fibers are certainly attractive, but what convinced the group to pursue this avenue was their flexibility, softness, and biocompatibility. The plan is to develop the platform into deep-brain-stimulation applications at first before exploring other possibilities. 

3. Bioprocessing with Hydrogels and DNA Aptamers.
A new microfluidic system comprises flexible fins capped with DNA aptamers that are embedded in a hydrogel able to respond to different stimuli https://www.seas.harvard.edu/news/2015/03/catching-and-releasing-tiny-molecules. When a biological solution is run through the chip, the aptamers bind to the target molecule they were designed for, and when the stimulus is applied the hydrogel moves the aptamers into a different environment to release the molecules; thus specific molecules can be quickly sorted and separated from a complex solution. The proof-of-concept involved pulling the thrombin enzyme from a mixture of proteins. The hydrogel can be made sensitive to temperature, light, electric/magnetic fields, ionic gradients, etc while the aptamers can be specifically targeted and respond to pH, temperature, and salt. Seems like a nice, modular, and extensible technology with lots of applications. 

4. Controlling Circadian Rhythms and Improving Sleep Cycles.
A couple of interesting studies this week provided insights into the control of circadian rhythms in the brain and improving sleep, a summary of both can be found here http://www.kurzweilai.net/neuroscientists-identify-key-cell-type-in-the-brain-that-controls-body-clock. First, a key group of neurons were identified in the suprachiasmatic nucleus that produce a signalling neuropeptide called neuromedin S, which is both necessary and sufficient for the control of circadian rhythms in the animal; this provides an interesting target to hack. Second, the latest evidence for artificial light, particularly blue light, having a negative impact on our sleep and health has been demonstrated and makes a strong case for limiting the exposure of such light before sleep. 

5. Increasing CRISPR Efficiency Eightfold.
A new development of the CRISPR genetic engineering system results in the system being eight times more efficient at inducing genetic modifications in cells https://www.mdc-berlin.de/44343169/en/news/2015/20150325-mdc_researchers_greatly_increase_precision. The advance was made possible by introducing genetic elements that inhibit one of two methods of DNA strand repair, which are (i) homology-directed repair in which introduced genetic elements contain flanking DNA used as a template to splice the cut, and (ii) non-homologous end-joining in which free DNA ends are joined without a template and tiny deletions occur. Basically, the new system inhibits (ii) from occurring and so making it far more likely that (i) will work to incorporate your genetic change of interest. In tests up to 60% of all cells were modified in one go with the new system, something that holds promise for effective and widespread somatic cell engineering at some point. 

6. DNA Origami & DNA Modular 3D Building Units.
DNA origami and DNA as a programmable molecular building material took another important step forward this week with a new approach to joining and modular 3D DNA building units by snapping together complementary shapes http://www.tum.de/en/about-tum/news/press-releases/short/article/32303/. This group has been a powerhouse in pushing DNA origami technology over the years. The new work programs DNA to self-assemble into 3D building blocks that are precisely shaped to fit together by incorporating the short-range binding mechanism known as nucleobase stacking that can snap multiple blocks together; currently the platform allows three different binding mechanisms to be used. The team used this platform to build micrometer sized filaments and nanoscale machines with moving parts, including nanoscale actuators able to switch or cycle between states orders of magnitude more often and more stably than any prior DNA origami technology. 

7. Festo Robotics Continue to Impress.
Festo is an incredible innovative company that continually produces amazing robots that have previously included a kangaroo, seagull, dragonfly, air jellies, and others. This week it showed off its latest insectoid additions, cooperative ant robots with 3D printed bodies and electronics are able to operate autonomously or work together to achieve goals, and truly elegant butterfly robots that really have to be seen to be appreciated http://spectrum.ieee.org/automaton/robotics/industrial-robots/festo-bionic-ants-and-butterflies - be sure to check the videos. In related robotics news a new Amazon contest hopes to spur faster and more efficient robotics automation in warehouses http://www.technologyreview.com/news/536086/amazon-robot-contest-may-accelerate-warehouse-automation/

8. Controlling Heat and Sound with Magnets.
Vibrations through 3D materials, known as acoustic phonons that propagate both heat and sound, have been shown for the first time to possess magnetic properties that allow them to be manipulated with magnetism http://spectrum.ieee.org/nanoclast/semiconductors/materials/for-first-time-reseachers-demonstrate-heat-and-sound-are-magnetic. In one proof-of-concept the team demonstrated they could reduce the amount of heat flowing through a semiconductor by 12%. Using the technique heat and sound waves can be steered magnetically, which is an interesting result and a new phenomenon to manipulate. But the experimental setup was precise and it isn’t obvious how immediate applications might be developed. 

9. Nanolasers and Photonic Guides.
One of the most efficient, easy to build, and compatible nanolasers ever build has been fabricated out of a monolayer sheet of tungsten diselenide atop a standard optical cavity base that is hoped to enable the device to more easily integrate and speed-up modern electronics http://www.kurzweilai.net/a-nanolaser-and-a-bendable-light-material-promise-to-speed-up-microelectronic-devices. Also, mentioned in the same article in related news is the fabrication of a 3D printed spatially-variant photonic crystal able to bend light around tight 90 degree corners without the losses that would occur in conventional fibers and other materials; yet another enabling photonic feature able to benefit improvements in modern electronics. 

10. Dynamically Generated Plasma to Dampen Shockwaves.
Boeing has developed (or at least filed a patent on) a technology able to dynamically generate plasmas able to mitigate or prevent damage from shockwaves caused by nearby explosive blasts for example http://spectrum.ieee.org/tech-talk/aerospace/military/boeing-files-patent-for-electromagnetic-arc-generator-to-protect-against-explosive-shockwaves. The system detects an explosion nearby and calculates when and where-from the shockwave will arrive, then uses an electromagnetic arc generator (and a LOT of energy) to heat a specific region of air in the path of the shockwave into a plasma able to attenuate or absorb the shockwave. Patents don’t get granted without demonstrating enablement and I do wonder if we’ll get to see this system successfully demonstrated. 

Archived: http://www.scitechdigest.net/2015/03/nanoparticles-stimulating-neurons.html
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Sunday read.
Newton's first law of physics: Every action has equal and opposite reaction.
Sometimes, we are not aware of all the equal and opposite reactions.
 
Materia Incognita

Last year I clocked about 50,000 air miles flying across the globe so the talk of the week about Germanwings (http://goo.gl/7b0jsV) was not only unsettling for me, personally, it also sparked a train of thought on the unreasonable nature of the event. Although our world is not totally logical it is not unreasonable. ‘Crazy’ things do not just happen. There is always an underlying cause we can trace back to its roots and actually understand why: http://goo.gl/XriI8O

Ultimately, everything we see, has happened because at some point we, as people, felt it was a good idea for it to happen. Then, as we evolved, and things evolved and people passed away and more people came in, the memetic nature of our culture (http://goo.gl/TuYGt) acted as a repository of knowledge so that practices that were good for us did not become lost with time, even if the reasons behind them did fade into the past. 

Technology is not just mere augmentation of our abilities. It is actually an improvement and it is always the result of adaptive development that is the response to a perceived environmental pressure. We create machines that do not just help us do things faster, better and more easily in terms of quantity but also in terms of quality: http://goo.gl/GY2gN4. We tend, in other words, to create external aids that help us optimize our resources. 

In the path that has taken us from the caves to the stars (http://goo.gl/L0NEdT) we have also evolved to modes of behavior that have grown in complexity. We are not always visible. Our complex minds which frequently must break down (http://goo.gl/l3wny), require the normalizing influence of others to help maintain their bearings: http://goo.gl/iUWR0b and though we may not all, always be in isolation, the world is fast-moving enough and complicated enough for some of us to truly become invisible. 

We really need people to notice us, in order for us to flourish: http://goo.gl/J2t8KX and when they don’t or we think they don’t our minds can go down some very dark paths indeed: http://goo.gl/OZTRfg, which brings me to AI. We think of artificial intelligence as an ‘augmentation’ of our brains, something that will help us do heavier cognitive lifting than we have ever done before, but really what we hope to be able to do is improve upon some of our functions: http://goo.gl/WQB3sa

We know that we are not logical beings and that our brains are prone to breaking down (or tiring) and in the application of AI we are seeking to externalize the qualities we do not have plenty of: analytic ability, speed of thought and logic: http://goo.gl/7g8jS5. Would an AI system have prevented the crash of the Germanwings jet had it been able to override the system, level the plane up and unlock the cockpit door? We are developing cars that can add this qualitative element to our performance: http://goo.gl/z8rSkX so adding it on planes may not be that far-fetched and, yes, it might even make a difference. 

Things have changed in the world. In the past we were each confined within tightly packed spheres of influence and interaction. Our presence was felt within the boundaries of communities that were circumscribed by physical location. To understand this consider that the atoms that make up your body (and mine) are 99.99999999% empty space and so are the atoms that make up the keyboard I am using to type this on. Yet my fingers do not pass through it all like some ghostly essence because of an electrostatic field (http://goo.gl/UbJPK3) that basically creates an ‘awareness’ of matter. 

It is this awareness that creates our sense of solidity in what we, so confidently, call reality. Similarly, with our social structures and communal connections, as they expand, as the pace gets faster and the relationships become more rarefied, it is easy to miss things, easy to ignore them. Easy to think it’s not our business. When people pass through our midst unnoticed (http://goo.gl/Gknw9W) they become less than what they are. They are diminished. Their brains misfire. 

As we widen the net of our connections we do need help in making sure we see all we need to. AI, may then, be just the thing we need to help us make sense of what we look at but cannot always see.

And just in case you are wondering whether Nature is ever that mystical, mysterious and perplexing consider what we found out very recently about Dark Matter (a misnomer it would appear) - http://goo.gl/k4wcds where a substance that’s everywhere in the universe manages to remain invisible to us because to it we just do not matter. 

The true mysterious nature in the world, the true materia incognita however is us, man. And we matter. We should never be invisible. 

I hope you managed to do your shopping on time this week in which case your brain should be firing on all cylinders on coffee and sugary treats. (Donuts, croissants, cookies and chocolate cake, you know the drill). Have one awesome Sunday wherever you are. 

#davidamerlandsundayread  
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It's all about balance and equilibrium between social interaction and solitude. There is a reason why we spend approximately a third of our life sleeping.
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dawn ahukanna

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Thought provoking query by +Thomas Baekdal.

For me, everyday on post-it note but rarely long form unless I'm mind-dumping or sketching.
Other than that, have not actually written in years and printing even longer. Why print when I have a screen and there is a screen reader?
 
Let me ask you question: When was the last time you wrote something by hand?

I started thinking about this over the weekend. The last time I wrote anything by hand was probably five years ago, and that was only a very short note. I cannot remember ever writing anything else by hand ever since. If I want to write something else, I will use of my digital devices, using a keyboard or gestures of some sort. 

And, if I think back to the last time I actually wrote more than a simple note, I would have to go all the way back to when I was in an exam for project management. Which was probably 10 years ago... or thereabout.

Writing by hand just isn't part of my life anymore, and that is despite that I work as a writer. This also shows at my desk. I don't actually own a pen. I mean, sure, I might be able to find one out in the cabinet in the hallway, where I keep all the things I never use. But I have no pen near my desk. Which means I also don't have any paper on my desk, and I haven't owned a printer for more than 11 years. 

It's kind of weird to think about. 

So the question is, when was the last time you wrote anything by hand? ... And do we even need to learn handwriting as a skill anymore?

Think about the next generation of kids. The ones who will be born tomorrow. When will they ever be in a situation where using a pencil to write something on a piece of paper make sense? I'm never in that situation today, because I will choose to write my notes digitally so that I have easy access to them later.

...or am I just being weird? ;)
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I usually write out notes at work, but that's about it. I started a creative diary a few months ago, but stopped it, because life happened and I needed my energy elsewhere. Diaries are best written by hand. If I have to memorize something, I write it by hand. 
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Fastest laps.
 
#F1 FASTEST LAPS: @ScuderiaFerrari have the edge in the opening phase of the

#MalaysiaGP #F1inMalaysia #GameOn!

Via @F1
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Drivers standings.
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It's all out in the open.
 
Pixar offers their professional rendering software, Renderman, for free!

FTA:
Aspiring animators, rejoice! Pixar’s coveted rendering software, RenderMan, can be all yours—for free.

Available for download on any non-commercial Mac, PC, or Linux computer, you can use the software without any limitations or watermarks. The only catch is that you have to pay a $495 licensing fee if you want to make money off your creations.

RenderMan is Pixar’s in-house program that has been used in all the Pixar films, as well as some Hollywood blockbusters like Godzilla and Pacific Rim. The knowledge that you can use the same software as big-budget films right on your home computer is pretty exciting.

Just keep in mind that this program only offers photorealistic 3D rendering. If you want to create your own 3D animations, Co.Design recommends Maya, which is also free to download. The RenderMan website says it also works well with The Foundry’s Katana.


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Taking the phrase "being on fire" literally. Via +Cara Evangelista.
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Most of the time ...
 
Who would want a stadarized mind? Not I!
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Software Alchemist - Turning base code into precious applications. Devsigner == 'Dev'eveloper + De'signer'
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