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David M Byrne
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Worldwide Destination Photography & Insights
Worldwide Destination Photography & Insights

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Bloubergstrand. Western Cape, South Africa

The city of Cape Town & Table Mountain as seen from across Table Bay in Bloubergstrand. Western Cape, South Africa.

Day 1 in Western Cape: http://travel.davidmbyrne.com/cape-town/

#travel #travelphotography #capetown #southafrica #westerncape
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Blue Front Cafe, Bentonia, Mississippi

Another Delta drive of some 16 miles southeast of Yazoo City brought us to Bentonia, a tiny town that boasts its very own unique ‘Bentonia-style’ of blues singing & guitar-playing. It’s also home to the oldest juke joint in Mississippi – and possibly the world – that is still in daily operation, the Blue Front Cafe. It doesn’t look like much, but that’s the shabby & rustic Juke Joint way. First opened in 1948 by locals Mary & Carey Holmes, in its early heyday the Blue Front Cafe was the spot for workers coming in from the fields for buffalo fish, drinks, music, haircuts, and more. Forced to operate under a tangled set of local rules during the segregation era, the Blue Front couldn’t, for example, sell Coca-Cola, a product reserved for whites, while a 10 p.m. curfew was routinely ignored at the height of the cotton gathering and ginning season to serve shift workers around the clock. Music was often impromptu with bookings for acts rare and advertisements for performances even rarer. Carey Holmes died in 1970 with ownership of the Blue Front Cafe passing to his son Jimmy ‘Duck’ Holmes, the last surviving performer of the Bentonia style of blues. A popular attraction to this day for those in search of an authentic blues experience in a rustic setting, Jimmy continues to operate it as an informal, down-home blues venue, one that has garnered international renown among blues enthusiasts.

From epic US road trip day 23: http://travel.davidmbyrne.com/usa-2016-south/

#travel #travelphotography #mississippi #mississippidelta #bentonia #jukejoint #deepsouth #roadtrip
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Yazoo City, Mississippi

Less than a decade ago, Yazoo City’s historic Main Street, probably the centrepiece of the National Register of Historic Places-listed Yazoo City Town Center Historic District, was in dire need of some upkeep – vacant buildings, most of which date to the early 1900s, were crumbling and ghost town status was fast approaching. Local business owners stepped in, purchased buildings, oversaw renovations, and attracted business, all of which sees Yazoo City’s Main Street enjoying something of a renaissance, not that you would know it of course when visiting on a Monday afternoon; parked cars were plentiful but Main Street Yazoo City was just as quiet as everywhere else was in the Delta on this today.

From epic US road trip day 22 - http://travel.davidmbyrne.com/usa-2016-south/

#travel #travelphotography #yazoocity #mississippi #mississippidelta #roadtrip #deepsouth
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Yazoo City, Mississippi

Closing up for the day? Cindi’s, Gifts of distinction, Main Street.

From epic US road trip day 23 - http://travel.davidmbyrne.com/usa-2016-south/

#travel #travelphotography #yazoocity #mississippi #roadtrip #mississippidelta
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Mississippi Delta Cotton Fields off US Highway 61

Only a few miles over the state line with Tennessee and the endless fields of cotton began stretching for miles on the flat plains of the northern Mississippi Delta. It should have been but it wasn’t initially obvious what all the white stuff was. The penny soon dropped, I pulled over, went investigating, and soon found myself among the waist-high cotton plants, the blindingly-white, soft, & fluffy fiber of the cotton boll, or protective case, a marked contrast to the stiff & prickly cotton plant itself. I couldn’t help but thinking how cotton pickin’ in the heat of the Delta would have been an arduous & uncomfortable undertaking.

From epic US road trip day 23: http://travel.davidmbyrne.com/usa-2016-south/

#mississippi #mississippidelta #cotton #cottonfield #travel #travelphotography #roadtrip #iconic 
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Dusk on Beale Street, Memphis, Tennessee

Shamelessly touristy and with a rustic, rough around the edges look & feel (unmistakably Southern, this looks & feels markedly different to anything we’d experienced north of here), Beale Street nonetheless has undeniable character; for blues aficionados there’s really nowhere else quite like it. While Beale Street stretches for just under 3 kilometres in total, it’s the short, 1-block, 100-metre-long pedestrianised stretch between S 2nd Street & South B.B. King Boulevard that most associate with Beale Street. A buzzing carnival zone most hours of the day, it especially comes alive at night when the wall-to-wall neon shines brightest, the street performers are doing their thing, and the smell of BBQ & sound of blues emanating from almost every premises seem to carry further on the warm evening breeze.

From epic US road trip day 22 - http://travel.davidmbyrne.com/usa-2016-south/

#travel #travelphotography #memphis #tennessee #bealestreet #blues #music #dusk 
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Worldwide Tourism Slogans

Tourism slogans from (almost) every country in the world.

http://davidmbyrne.com/

#travel #map #slogan
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Dyess, Arkansas

Dyess was founded as Dyess Colony in 1934 by President Roosevelt and was home to nearly 500 families stricken by the Great Depression of the 1930s making it the largest agrarian community relocation experiment established by the US federal government during the Great Depression. Selected on the basis of need, farming knowledge, and physical fitness, the Dyess pioneers each cleared land for farms with the government-subsidised help of 40 acres and a single mule. Many buildings were built by the pioneers for the fledgling colony, including a large Commissary, a Town Hall, a Cannery, a Theater, & a school. Succumbing to fire, few of the original buildings survive to this day, but those that do are listed on the National Register of Historic Places as the ‘Dyess Colony Center’ – the colony has been somewhat resurrected through restoration of several historic buildings by Arkansas State University, buildings now open to visitors. Two of those restored buildings are seen here on Center Drive of Dyess Colony Circle, its town square. The large Dyess Colony Administration Building, first built in 1936, today houses the Dyess Colony Museum with exhibits related to establishment of the colony, lifestyles of typical colonists, and the impact that growing up in Dyess had on Johnny Cash and his music. To the right of the Administration Building, the Dyess Theatre, built in 1947 after the original community building burned, is today home to The Dyess Colony Visitors Center. The tiny present-day settlement of Dyess, measuring only 2.5 km² & with a population of some 500, was a veritable ghost town when we drove through late on a Sunday afternoon (we found it hard to find a local in order to garner directions to the Johnny Cash Boyhood Home). Nevertheless, Dyess still impressed with its array of ‘Historic Dyess Colony’ signage informing us as to the hidden gem that we had unexpectedly just stumbled upon.

From epic US road trip day 22.

http://travel.davidmbyrne.com/usa-2016-greatplains/#day22

#traveling   #travel   #travelphotography   #travelpics   #dyess   #arkansas   #johnnycash   #johnnycashboyhoodhome   #naturalstate   #greatplains   #dyesscolony   #arkansasstateuniversity   #historic  
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Busch Stadium, St. Louis, Missouri

Completed in time for Opening Day in April 2006 and with a capacity of 44,000, Busch Stadium is home of the St. Louis Cardinals, the city’s beloved MLB franchise and the most successful team in MLB’s National League, a.k.a the Senior Circuit; the Cardinals have won 11 World Series championships, second only to the New York Yankees’ 27, the primary reason St. Louis is classed a baseball town. The present stadium is the third stadium in St. Louis to carry the Busch name. It replaced Busch Memorial Stadium (a.k.a. Busch Stadium II, 1982-2005) and occupies a portion of that stadium’s former footprint, the rest of the footprint turned into a multi-phase residential and entertainment complex dubbed Ballpark Village. Busch Stadium is similar to the many other so-called ‘retro-classic’ fields built in recent years, and like all the others it too offers a panoramic view of the downtown skyline, including views of The Gateway Arch.

From epic US road trip day 22.

http://travel.davidmbyrne.com/usa-2016-greatplains/

#travel   #travelphotography   #travelpics   #stlouis   #missouri   #buschstadium   #baseball   #MLB   #stadium   #cardinals   #greatplains   #missouriadventure  
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