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It’s called a "blue moon" and Friday evening at dusk if you look to the eastern horizon you’ll get to see one as it rises into the night sky. And what is a blue moon you might ask? It’s not because it’s blue. It’s a term used to describe a second full moon in one calendar month. And it’s something that doesn’t happen very often, says Matt Benjamin, education programs manager at CU-Boulder’s Fiske Planetarium.

"Our calendar months range from 30 to 31 days in length," Benjamin said. "The lunar cycle is right around 28, 29 days. Most months a full moon is happening on the third or forth and anytime after means you only get one full moon a month. But on those very unique occasions you can have a full moon on the first day or two of the month and still have time in that calendar month for the moon to come back to its full phase. And that just doesn’t happen all that often - it may happen every year or so."

And Benjamin points out that the term - once in a blue moon - has its roots in this rare celestial event.

"This is a phrase used a lot. When you say, 'once in a blue moon.' And it’s usually meant to indicate that a lot of time passes – that’s it’s a rare event to signify that what ever you are referring to it doesn’t happen all that often," he said.

Full story including #soundcloud  audio - http://www.colorado.edu/news/features/stunning-blue-moon-expected-shine-brightly-friday-night

#bluemoon   #moon   #fullmoon   #space   #calendar   #planet   #science   #lunar   #sun   #atmosphere   #cuboulder  
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A team of researchers has developed a wireless device the width of a human hair that can be implanted in the brain and activated by remote control to deliver drugs.

The technology, demonstrated for the first time in mice, one day may be used to treat pain, depression, epilepsy and other neurological disorders in people by targeting therapies to specific brain circuits, according to researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and the University of Colorado Boulder.

#brain   #drugs   #depression   #epilepsy   #neurology   #neuroscience   #research   #humanhair   #therapy  
#cuboulder   #highereducation  
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An international research team led by the University of Colorado Boulder and the University of Witwatersrand in Johannesburg, South Africa, has discovered a milk-and ochre-based paint dating to 49,000 years ago that inhabitants may have used to adorn themselves with or to decorate stone or wooden slabs.

While the use of ochre by early humans dates to at least 250,000 years ago in Europe and Africa, this is the first time a paint containing ochre and milk has ever been found in association with early humans in South Africa, said Paola Villa, a curator at the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History and lead study author.

#archeology   #humanhistory   #research   #cuboulder   #southafrica  
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Children consume more low-nutrition, high-calorie food such as cookies and candy after observing seemingly overweight cartoon characters, according to a first-of-its-kind study led by the University of Colorado Boulder.

“Because research like this is new -- looking at kids and stereotyping particularly of cartoon characters -- we weren’t sure whether kids would be aware of bodyweight norms,” said Margaret C. Campbell, marketing professor at Leeds School of Business and lead author of the study. “But surprisingly, they apply typically human standards to cartoon creatures -- creatures for which there isn’t a real baseline.”

#stereotypes   #cartoon   #eating   #health   #bodyweight   #food   #obesity   #indulge   #healthyeating   #children   #kidshealth   #colorado   #cuboulder   #nutrition   #influence  
Children consume more low-nutrition, high-calorie food such as cookies and candy after observing seemingly overweight cartoon characters, according to a first-of-its-kind study led by CU-Boulder.
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Bighorn sheep in Rocky Mountain National Park are maintaining healthy levels of genetic diversity, according to a new study in the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology (EBIO) at CU-Boulder. Full story - http://bit.ly/1ejvUT3

Photo: Ann Hough/United States Fish and Wildlife Service

#bighornsheep   #wildlife   #nationalpark   #rockymountains   #colorado   #research   #biology   #ecology   #highereducation   #cuboulder   #genetics  
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The Center for World University Rankings (CWUR) announced that the University of Colorado Boulder climbed to No. 54 from No. 63 in its annual rankings list.

CU-Boulder is among the more than 25,000 degree-granting institutions of higher education worldwide in this year’s CWUR list (www.cwur.org).

“At CU-Boulder we are very proud to serve our state as a true center of global excellence. This and a good many other rankings confirm that,” said CU-Boulder Chancellor Philip P. DiStefano. “Behind the CWUR ranking, though, is a greater story: a dedicated campus community devoted to student success, world-class research and community service, and, in my mind, our people are No. 1.”
CWUR publishes the only global university ranking that measures the quality of education and training of students as well as the prestige of faculty members and the quality of faculty research without relying on surveys and university data submissions.

More details - http://www.colorado.edu/news/releases/2015/07/17/cu-boulder-climbs-global-academic-rankings

Photo: Kenna Bruner

#academia   #university   #ranking   #colorado   #global   #cuboulder   #highereducation   #faculty   #research   #academic  
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Southern Californians and writers love to blame the hot, dry Santa Ana winds for tense, ugly moods, and the winds have long been associated with destructive wildfires. Now, NOAA researchers have found that on occasion, the winds have an accomplice with respect to fires, at least: Natural atmospheric events known as stratospheric intrusions, which bring extremely dry air from the upper atmosphere down to the surface, adding to the fire danger effects of the Santa Anas, and exacerbating some air pollution episodes.

The findings suggest that forecast models with the capacity to predict stratospheric intrusions may provide valuable lead time for agencies to issue air quality alerts and fire weather warnings, or to reallocate fire fighting resources before these extreme events occur.

#wind   #stratosphere   #fires   #wildfires   #california   #santaana   #noaa   #atmosphere   #research   #weather  
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Since middle school, CU-Boulder student Willie Payne has looked for ways to incorporate music composition and computer science. With dreams of composing music for video games, Payne became interested in exploring new ways of using technology. Specifically, Payne wanted to create unique musical dynamics and adaptations where the user controls sounds.

Last summer, the Undergraduate Research Opportunities Program funded Payne’s guitar effects program, where he designed his own computer program that allows him to create any kind of experimental effects he wanted.

Full Story - http://www.colorado.edu/news/features/student-life-video-game-music

#music   #videogames   #composition   #research   #computerscience   #student   #guitar   #cuboulder   #art   #collaboration   #community  
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A University of Colorado Boulder scientist unexpectedly discovered two lichen species new to science in the same week while conducting research in Boulder Colorado, near the city’s eastern limits.
Lichens are complex life forms composed of at least two separate organisms, primarily a fungus and an alga that form a symbiotic relationship. They can live on soil, rocks, tree bark, desert sand, animal bones and rusty metal, for example.

#lichen   #science   #species   #boulder   #organisms   #fungus   #soil   #research   #colorado  
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A CU-Boulder team has discovered a permanent but lopsided dust cloud surrounding the moon. The dust cloud increases in density when annual celestial events like the Geminids spew shooting stars, said chief study scientist and CU-Boulder physics Professor Mihaly Horanyi. 

For more on this finding visit http://www.colorado.edu/news/releases/2015/06/17/moon-engulfed-permanent-lopsided-dust-cloud

Photo: Daniel Morgan and Jamey Szalay, University of Colorado

#moon   #dust   #celestial   #Geminids   #space   #spaceexploration   #interplanetary   #apollo   #solarsystem   #science   #cuboulder   #highered  
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Forever Buff Chad Arnold (MBA’07) and his team at Door to Door Organics are are helping to reinvent grocery shopping for the digital age.
“When I began to ask the fundamental question of why more people don’t shop for food online, I found the answer wasn’t because our box of produce wasn’t perfect,” says Arnold, 41. “It was because nobody had really made online grocery relevant to how people shop and eat.”

#organic   #organic_food   #grocery   #groceries   #colorado   #shopping   #shoppingonline   #alumni   #highereducation   #eathealthy   #eatlocal   #cuboulder  
At Door to Door Organics, Chad Arnold (MBA’07) is helping reinvent how people shop for groceries.
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Congratulations to all the past, present and future Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics scientists and students involved in the NASA New Horizons Mission today! With this flyby of the Pluto system, CU-Boulder/LASP has now sent instruments to every planet (and former planet) in the solar system.

“The encounter is a landmark event along the way to explore the outskirts of the solar system, even beyond Pluto, for possibly decades to come,” said Mihaly Horanyi, LASP researcher and Principal Investigator for the Student Dust Counter project.

"No doubt in my mind, CU is the best place in the world to involve students in space research!"

“We did it!” said CU-Boulder Professor Fran Bagenal, a New Horizons co-investigator who leads the New Horizons Particles and Plasma Team and is a faculty member in the Department of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences. “We’ve been waiting nearly a decade, but as everyone can see, it certainly was worth the effort.”

“Our instrument has been plowing through our solar system’s dust disk and gathering data since launch,” said CU-Boulder doctoral student Jamey Szalay. “The measurements tell us about the evolution of our solar system and will help us understand how other solar systems billions and billions of miles away may look.

“We’re thrilled to have reached Pluto, and we can’t wait to journey into the heart of the Kuiper Belt to learn what’s out there.”

Read more:

http://www.colorado.edu/news/releases/2015/07/14/new-horizons-phones-home-cu-boulder-students-faculty-elated

http://lasp.colorado.edu/home/blog/2015/07/14/instrument-designed-by-cu-boulder-students-speeds-by-pluto-on-historic-new-horizons-mission/

#Pluto   #plutoflyby   #space   #science   #spacecraft   #nasa   #newhorizons   #cuboulder   #LASP   #spaceexploration   #research   #highereducation   #universityofcolorado  
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Boulder, CO
USColoradoBoulder
(303) 492-1411colorado.edu
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The University of Colorado Boulder is the flagship university of the state of Colorado, and offers a dynamic community of scholars and learners situated on one of the most spectacular college campuses. Also known as CU-Boulder and CU. 
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Review Summary
4.4
91 reviews
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Large public school founded in 1876 & known for its scenic campus & law program.- Google
"This is incredibly prevalent in the engineering department."
"The best decision of my life was to come here for undergrad."
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4 months ago
If you are looking to study engineering I do not recommend this University, the reason being a) Most professors are too busy to help you. b) The University tells you to go through study groups for success (I do not like study groups I am sorry). c) If you prefer learning on your own and understanding everything, then this University does not advocate that (connected to b). d) T.A and L.A are of no help or 0 help. e) Online homework is annoying (this is one of the few universities I know that give that).
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rafeeq indikar
5 months ago
my son Tauseef is studying in this university in m.s.electrical and electronics. nice and great.
Sheila Wall
a year ago
All four of us siblings graduated from Boulder in the seventies and eighties. One sister went to the law school and did very well as a patent attorney--but she is a scientist as well. Her major was Molecular, Cellular, Developmental Biology. She is looking at Boulder for her son, now, and we were discussing how lonely and impersonal that very large campus can be. Probably because of that, I sent one of my children to Xavier University, a Jesuit University in Cincinnati, and he did very well there--it is small (about 6,000 students) personal and was set up to address his learning issues. Although he is dyslexic, he majored in Japanese and Asian Studies. He taught English in Japan for a year. He is now working in hotels hoping to be a GM of a large hotel someday. My daughter went to Boston University though she looked at CU and DU. BU is a huge university, but unlike Boulder, Arts and Sciences admits about 6000 students. So she had the big school atmosphere in the exciting city of Boston, but her college was far more personal and accessible than CU. She did very well there. Her degree was in environmental policy and she got a job right away with the Army Corps of Engineers. She worked there for a year, but hated it so much, that she started experimenting with making liquor. Through some contacts she formed, she found a job in a "craft distillery" in NC, and now she makes whiskey all day. Loves it. Makes money. I also graduated from Boulder from MCDB and went to medical school. It was an experience I would not repeat. The third sibling graduated from Electrical Engineering and worked for the FAA until he retired. The fourth would say nothing that I could write down about her Boulder experience-- she was a party animal, flunked out and was angry at all of the remedial work she had to do. Boulder is a beautiful town but downtown Pearl Street looks exactly like it did in 1968 when as high school students we used to sneak up there to be cool. So, if you're the kind of person who is a self-starter, doesn't mind loneliness, is able to join groups or sororities or fraternities in order to be less alone, you'll probably like the "wide open spaces" of Boulder. If you are self-disciplined you will use the excellent academics well. If you are not, you will be sucked into the party circuit and be lost to the world (not a joke).If you have any kind of learning issues--learning disabilities, Boulder is not for you. Try the University of Arizona at Tempe. If you'll need a lot of assistance at first, look at the College of Mt. St. Joe in Cincinnati, It sure isn't Boulder, but it will help you transition to college.
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Tyler Peterson
6 months ago
Amazing school. So proud to go here!
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Brian Smart
5 months ago
Fantastic school and culture. The best decision of my life was to come here for undergrad.
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Chris Zun
11 months ago
I'm currently considering entering the Architectural Engineering program UC has to offer. Prior to this, I've done some of my studies in Tempe, Arizona at Arizona State University. I plan to transfer my credits once I've received instate tuition and enroll into the Spring of 2016! ASU has great programs as well, however for me, I need something new. I'm hopeful that UC can enhance my college experience.
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J Pierce
11 months ago
my Step Daughter attends here.. She loves it.. Beautiful campus, great staff. No complaints yet.
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Michael B
a year ago
I actually got my degree here in Environmental Studies a few years back. I ended up taking classes through the engineering department this year and it was then I realized the quality of teaching had drastically fallen. In the fours years I attended, at least in one class each semester, there was a professor that really gave the impression she/he cared about the students. In the engineering department or maybe this is the direction the university has taken, there was not one teacher that really cared about their students. The problem lies with both the professors and the university. The university hires professors based on their research (aka money) each will provide (as more than one professor has explained). Then these people are required to teach classes. So the majority of them do the bare minimum to present the material to students as their research is more important. Thus many "professors" do not have the drive to teach their students. This is incredibly prevalent in the engineering department. It was a bit deceiving at first because the engineering department boasts quite a few accomplished, world renowned researchers, but they are just that, researchers, not professors. I actually passed my courses this semester, but I chose not to pursue a degree at this university. I'm a tad bit surprised at how far the university's standards have fallen since I've graduated. If you don't believe me, check the top 100 universities world wide for each degree offered; the University of Colorado at Boulder fails to make the majority.
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