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Cornerpoint Law
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Legal Advice + Risk Management. On Point For Your Business.
Legal Advice + Risk Management. On Point For Your Business.

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Citing a security breach and low engagement, Google has announced that Google+ will be shutting down for most of us effective August 2019. I'm getting an early start and bid Google+ adieu. Cornerpoint Law can still be found on Twitter (@cornerpointlaw), Facebook (facebook.com/cornerpointlaw), and YouTube (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCz70QsaeLoVGdLdzBaw-Iwg). Thank you, followers, for your support!
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What are civil motions, and why should you care? Understanding the litigation process helps businesses appreciate the value of loss prevention and litigation avoidance and encourages risk management practices. And if a lawsuit becomes a reality, understanding the process helps set expectations and ease uncertainty. Check out our latest post, Civil Motions Q&A: Making Order(s) Out of Chaos, to learn about some of the most common types of civil motions: Default Motions, Dispositive Motions, Discovery Motions, Evidentiary Motions, and others.

https://cornerpointlaw.com/blog/litigation/common-washington-civil-motions-qa/
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This is a Cornerpoint Case Pop post.

The Case: Pellham v. Let’s Go Tubing, Inc., 199 Wn. App. 399, 398 P.3d 1205, Washington Court of Appeals, Division III (June 27, 2017)

What do Washington businesses need to know about legal liability for injuries in sports and recreation? The law recognizes the reality of the industry: (1) sports and recreational activities pose a risk of injury to participants, and (2) participants are generally aware of the risks and still choose to proceed with the activity.

Check out the blogpost Implied Assumption of Risk: A Cornerpoint Case Pop to learn more. https://cornerpointlaw.com/blog/risk-management/implied-assumption-of-risk-in-washington-cornerpoint-case-pops/
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What happens after a plaintiff files a lawsuit and the defendant answers the complaint? Washington civil litigants then enter a phase known as “discovery.” Discovery allows all parties to have (somewhat) equal knowledge of the facts of the case so that each party can evaluate strengths and weaknesses, develop a strategy, and, most of the time, settle the case. Learn more in Cornerpoint Law's latest blogpost, Charting Discovery: Show Me Your Cards.

http://cornerpointlaw.com/blog/litigation/charting-discovery-show-me-your-cards/
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This is a Cornerpoint Case Pop post.

The Case: State v. The Mandatory Poster Agency, Inc., 199 Wn. App. 506, 398 P.3d 1271, Washington Court of Appeals, Division I (July 3, 2017)

The Washington Consumer Protection Act (the "CPA") governs virtually everyone doing business in Washington. Not only do both private parties and the State have the ability to file CPA lawsuits against businesses - a rare convergence in civil litigation - but the court may impose civil penalties for violations. The Mandatory Poster Agency case did not go well for the defendant, as the court concluded that the 79,000+ solicitations it mailed to Washington corporations mimicked governmental forms, capable of deceiving a substantial portion of the public, so that hefty penalties were warranted.

Learn more about the case and the unique attributes of the CPA on my blog at http://cornerpointlaw.com/blog/risk-management/cornerpoint-case-pops-only-magicians-should-deceive-washington-consumer-protection-act/
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In April 2018, I was pleased to co-present a continuing education class to insurance professionals about the examination under oath process. EUOs, as they're called, are investigations by an insurance company when it suspects a policyholder of fraud.
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This is a Cornerpoint Case Pop post.

The Case: Guidance Residential, LLC v. Mangrio, Washington Court of Appeals, Division I, No. 75507-2-I (Unpublished)

Under the right circumstances, customer lists are trade secrets. Is your business doing enough to compile, maintain, and protect your customer lists? The December 2017 Guidance Residential v. Mangrio decision serves as a textbook case of how to prove that an employee’s unauthorized use of a customer list is a misappropriation of a trade secret.

Read more about the legal test that applies to customer lists and key takeaways from the case at http://cornerpointlaw.com/blog/litigation/cornerpoint-case-pops-are-customer-lists-trade-secrets/
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Recent amendments to Washington law double the allowable ceiling of a superior court mandatory arbitration award from $50,000 to $100,000. Understanding the differences between court, binding arbitration, and mandatory civil arbitration is more important - for both businesses and individuals - than ever before. Read more about the characteristics of mandatory civil arbitration in Cornerpoint Law's latest blogpost.

http://cornerpointlaw.com/blog/litigation/washington-mandatory-civil-arbitration-no-agreement-necessary/
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Last October, I posted a chart showing the different court options for litigating civil disputes in Washington. But what happens after you or your opponent chooses a court? In the blogpost Initial Pleadings: How a Lawsuit Starts Rolling, link below, I cover the vocabulary and rudimentary first steps in starting or responding to a #lawsuit. By understanding the brass tacks of the #litigation process, businesses can make personalized strategic decisions about risk management and dispute resolution.

http://cornerpointlaw.com/blog/litigation/initial-pleadings-how-a-lawsuit-starts-rolling/
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This is a Cornerpoint Case Pop post.

The Case: Smelser v. Paul, Washington Supreme Court, 188 Wn.2d 648, 398 P.3d 1086 (2017)

Unsupervised children can be injured at even the most innocuous of businesses. It is now settled law in Washington that when a parent's negligent supervision of their child combines with a business's negligence, the business is financially responsible for the parents’ role in causing the injury to the child. In other words, the business will be liable for damages for not only the business's percentage of responsibility in causing the injury, but also the parents'.

http://cornerpointlaw.com/blog/risk-management/cornerpoint-case-pops-what-businesses-need-to-know-about-negligent-parental-supervision/
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