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Brookhaven National Laboratory
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We’re kicking things into high gear at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. Revving up for our next physics run, Brookhaven technician Mike Myers checks components of the stochastic cooling “kickers,” which generate electric fields to nudge ions in RHIC’s gold beams back into tightly packed bunches so they collide within our detectors as close to head-on as possible. This system of squeezing and cooling beams increases the rate of collisions between ions and improves the amount of data coming out of RHIC.
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Climate science gets a boost from a cargo ship – an array of high-tech instruments will ride along on repeated voyages between Los Angeles and Hawaii, collecting unparalleled environmental data for an entire year.
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Data collected at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN in Switzerland has culminated in the discovery of a new particle that is about 135 times heavier than a proton. But is it really the Higgs particle predicted by the theory that explains the origin of the mass of most elementary particles in the universe? The discovery and its possible identity is discussed in this video by Sally Dawson and Howard Gordon, two Brookhaven Lab physicist with deep roots in the hunt for the Higgs.
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Nuclear physicists would like to build a new machine: an electron-ion collider designed to shine a very bright "light" on both protons and heavy ions to reveal their inner secrets.
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Electrons are getting cooler than ever at Brookhaven. We're finding ways to get even more data out of subatomic collisions.
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The superconducting magnets of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider are cooling once more, preparing to guide proton beams into collision. 
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"Understanding change at the top of the world so we’ll know what is going to happen later"
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Brookhaven's x-ray vision helped hunt for flaws in a new NASA telescope. Next step? Studying black holes, supernovae, and other cosmic phenomena in greater detail than ever before.
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Check out this video about the incredible breakthroughs in nuclear physics over the past decade and the exciting discoveries on the horizon. Two of our RHIC physicists talk about simulating the Big Bang and Brookhaven's role in the future of physics. 
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Atom-smashers keep strange hours - our physicists pull all-nighters at Brookhaven's collider, sipping coffee and sifting through subatomic debris.
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Research in the physical, biomedical, and environmental sciences.
Introduction
A passion for discovery is alive and well at Brookhaven National Laboratory, a multipurpose research institution established in 1947 for the peacetime exploration of science. Located on a 5,300-acre site on Long Island, NY, the Laboratory employs nearly 3,000 scientists, engineers, and support staff. Brookhaven is funded primarily by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science and houses large-scale instruments and facilities — many available nowhere else in the world.

Each year, about 5,000 laboratory, university, and industry scientists use these facilities to delve into the basic mysteries of physics, chemistry, biology, materials science, energy, and the environment — and at the intersections of these disciplines. Seven Nobel-Prize-winning discoveries and countless other advances have their origins at the Lab, with applications in fields as diverse as medicine and national security.

Brookhaven scientists are expanding our understanding of the properties and function of matter from the microscopic to the cosmic scales. At the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), a 2.4-mile-circumference particle accelerator designed to replicate conditions microseconds after the Big Bang to better understand subatomic particles and their interactions, researchers have found that the early universe was a nearly “perfect” liquid.

At the Center for Functional Nanomaterials (CFN), scientists are probing the unique properties of matter at the nanoscale — on the order of billionths of a meter — with the aim of developing new materials to help solve our nation’s energy challenges.

And at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), researchers are studying the inner workings of materials ranging from catalysts, to computer chips, to biological materials. To take their research to the next level — to probe even smaller, subtler details of their samples — scientists need more intense, better-focused light. Now under construction, theNational Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) will deliver world-leading intensity and brightness, producing x-rays 10,000 times brighter than the existing NSLS. This will enable scientists to image materials down to a nanometer — a capability not available at any other light source in the world.
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