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Brigham and Women's Hospital
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Scott Weiner, MD, MPH, emergency physician at BWH and Brigham and Women's Faulkner Hospital (BWFH), has seen the opioid crisis unfold before his eyes. Through his role on the board of the Massachusetts College of Emergency Physicians, Weiner is advising the state on a new version of the Prescription Drug Monitoring Program, which is a database listing opioid prescriptions for patients across Massachusetts. This fall, physicians will be required by law to check the database before prescribing a schedule 2 or 3 narcotic, one of many provisions in an opioid bill passed in March in Massachusetts. ‪#‎OpioidEpidemic‬
As opioid-related deaths surge nationwide, the Brigham community grapples with treating pain while fighting addiction.
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Women who are plagued by chronic yeast infections tend to suffer from at least four or more per year, says Natasha Johnson, M.D., director of the vulvovaginal disease center at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston. Johnson spoke with Women's Health to discuss the top five most common reasons why you might be stuck on an endless cycle of Monistat.
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6.6 million people in the United States suffer from a common, incurable autoimmune condition called alopecia. When ‪#‎alopecia‬ caused 5-year-old Leila Mostaghimi’s thick blonde curls to fall out in chunks, Brigham and Women’s Hospital dermatologist Dr. Arash Mostaghimi, MD, MPA, MPH made a commitment: He would dedicate his career to helping his little girl. The Boston Herald caught up with the Mostaghimi’s to discuss their experiences and continued hope in search of a cure.
When an incurable condition called alopecia caused 5-year-old Leila Mostaghimi’s thick blonde curls to fall out in chunks, Brigham and Women’s Hospital dermatologist Dr. Arash Mostaghimi made a commitment: He would dedicate his career to helping his little girl.
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When Paralympic athletes hit the swimming pool and race tracks in Rio de Janeiro, Cheri Blauwet, MD, a sports medicine physician at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, will be there — this time, not as a competitor, but as a medical advisor tracking concussions, infections, and blindfolded collisions. Blauwet, who has two Boston Marathon victories and seven Paralympic medals as a wheelchair racer, will head to Rio in late August to head up the medical committee that advises the Paralympic Games. In this article, Blauwet speaks with STAT to discuss her role at the ‪#‎Rio2016‬ ‪#‎Olympics‬.
Dr. Cheri Blauwet, a former wheelchair racer now advises Paralympics on medical issues: concussions, infections, and blindfolded collisions.
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In a recent interview with The New York Times, President Obama revealed that he typically gets 6 hours or less of sleep per night. Charles Czeisler , MD and chief of the Division of Sleep and Circadian Disorders at Brigham and Women’s Hospital told The Huffington Post , “I’m kind of amazed. He seems to maintain quite a regular schedule, which I think is quite exemplary.” By no means does Czeisler endorse Obama’s short slumber, but the sleep expert does state that the president is doing a lot of other things right when it comes to his sleep habits.
The president isn’t perfect when it comes to getting enough rest, but he's doing several things right.
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Opioid addiction is wreaking havoc on families and communities across the United States, with overdoses from prescription pain relievers and heroin causing a surge in hospital visits and fatalities. According to the CDC, 28,647 people died from overdoses in this country in 2014, quadruple the rate in 2000. Massachusetts has one of the fastest growing overdose death rates, increasing 18.8 percent from 2013 to 2014. In this podcast, learn more about the origins of the ‪#‎opioid‬ crisis and the science of pain and addiction from Martin Samuels, MD, one of the world’s leading neurologists.
Learn about the origins of the opioid crisis and the science of pain and addiction from Martin Samuels, MD, one of the world’s leading neurologists.
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Nasal congestion is never fun when you’re sick, but for some, nasal congestion is a chronic condition. Rachel Roditi, MD, an otolaryngologist at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, spoke with Reader's Digest to address the top 7 reasons chronic nasal congestion occurs and potential treatment options.
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Little Papi, a 10-year-old bulldog from South Boston, had a hole in the roof of his mouth that just wouldn’t heal. After three unsuccessful surgeries and no other options, an innovative tissue glue developed at BWH was used to heal the wound. William Rosenblad, Little Papi’s dental surgeon at MSPCA-Angell, reached out to Jeffrey Karp, a PhD bioengineer at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, and his team. The two met at a conference last spring at the New England Aquarium where Karp was giving a talk about his tissue adhesives. “I used to say that one of my major goals was to translate technology to patients,” said Karp. “I now expanded that goal to include not just humans, but also animals.”
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For some expectant moms, C-sections can make them feel cheated out of the puffing, pushing, seeing-my-baby-take-her-first-breath moments or getting the chance to bond right after delivery. The “gentle C-section,” also called a “family-centered C-section,” seeks to change this. William Camann, MD, director of obstetric anesthesiology at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, spoke with Pregnancy and Newborn Magazine regarding the procedure. “It doesn’t require additional training. The modifications needed to do a gentle C-section are really pretty simple,” Camann says, “But the change it brings in the whole environment and the attitude in the operating room makes a big difference.”
Follow Dressed in a thin paper gown, you nervously look up at your partner, who squeezes your hand as your doula leads you through calming breaths. Your playlist switches over to a Katy Perry s…
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If you feel like there's an inflatable inner-tube wrapped around your belly, you're far from alone. Bloating — that feeling of abdominal fullness that seems to be the bane of every woman — is a common misery. In this article from Today Health & Wellness, Lori Tishler, MD, a primary-care physician at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains the top reasons why women seem to suffer from bloat more than men.
If you feel like there's an inflatable inner-tube wrapped around your belly, you're not alone. Here's what causes bloating and how to deal.
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Is it safe to use a hot tub when pregnant? Louise Wilkins-Huag, MD, PhD, and Sarah Little, MD, MPH, of Brigham and Women’s Hospital, spoke with Pregnancy magazine to discuss why doctors generally recommend that mothers avoid using hot tubs when pregnant.
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People with red hair make up 1 to 2 percent of the world's population. Recent research has shown that people who have the gene known to cause red hair are at an even higher-than-usual risk for developing skin cancer. Joseph Merola, MD, MMSC, a dermatologist at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, recently spoke with Today Health & Wellness regarding the findings. "We've known for many years now that redheads have a 10 to 100 times increase risk of melanoma, and even though they make up only 1 to 2 percent of the population, they make up to 16 percent of those with melanoma.”
People with a gene that blesses them with red hair also get a less-welcome gift -- a higher risk of skin cancer.
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75 Francis St Boston, MA 02115
75 Francis StreetUSMassachusettsBoston02115
(617) 732-5500brighamandwomens.org
Hospital, Medical Center
Hospital
Medical Center
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Boston’s Brigham and Women’s Hospital (BWH) is an international leader in virtually every area of medicine and has been the site of pioneering breakthroughs that have improved lives around the world. A major teaching hospital of Harvard Medical School, BWH has a legacy of excellence that continues to grow year after year. Brigham and Women’s Health Care – the parent corporation for Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Brigham and Women’s Faulkner Hospital and the Brigham and Women’s Physician Organization – includes 150 outpatient practices with over 1,200 physicians. We serve patients from New England, throughout the United States, and from 120 countries around the world.
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Review Summary
3.9
75 reviews
5 star
44 reviews
4 star
12 reviews
3 star
3 reviews
2 star
2 reviews
1 star
14 reviews
"BWH needs to do a better job with new customers."
"They need to work on sexual harassment training."
"BWH Pathology Department is one of the most renowned around the globe."
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All reviews
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Helen ODonnell
a week ago
Dreadful place. They have made a ton of mistakes and none are cleared up yet. The more closely you loo, the more mistakes you find. It's a full-time job to try to get them cleared up. I was just reading my medical records and to my shock they say I was being injected with insulin!!! I don't have diabetes. I don't take insulin. My doctor said this could have been fatal. The medical history has been altered and now says I had an operation I never had, and a medical condition I have never been diagnosed with. The medical records completely contradict the stiry the BWH neurologist told me that I was never operated on or was given clot-bustinjg drugs. I don't understand why I can't just get a straight story from them. Anything they do say, they'll then deny later. I'd rather be dead than back here again. They've got nothing straight. I'm thinking now they musr have xed me me up with another patient . I don't think I'll ever get the truth, an answer, or any accountability from them. If you go there and have any problems, you'll never get an answer and you have no rights. I'd give them a negative rating if I could. Beware, they're going after rich and celebrity patients. If you're an ordinary person like me, you'll hsve no rights.
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Katie Snow
a month ago
Coming from a small town in Maine to such a big city hospital I was expecting my mother to be treated more like just another patient, rather than an actual person. The entire staff here treated her with such care and humility. What started out as a horrible, traumatic experience turned out to be not so bad.
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Michael Thompson
4 months ago
They need to work on sexual harassment training. Hospital Security Very unprofessional. I am very well behaved and attractive heterosexual male. They were harassing me by attempting to intimidate me: staring at me, positioning themselves in my line of sight, walking too close to me, etc... ER Several times now, male employees (Techs, Nurses, etc...) have abused their power and been very rude to me, including attempting to bully me to impress female staff members. Not a very welcoming place if the males feel that the females find you sexually attractive. THIS IS SEXUAL HARASSMENT.
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Mary Richard
8 months ago
My care through a hip surgery was excellent from beginning to end. I went from a VAMC clinic in another state, to B&WH, for evaluation, then due to red tape, much later to have pre op, then finally surgery & post op, & every single bit of it was excellent. I fact, I am considering moving to Boston, because of my care there. I am a polytrauma veteran, with many physical limitations & financial constraints, so a move for me is a very difficult process, & there are many obstacles, but I will do it if I can because my care was so excellent.
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Delaney Bannister
a month ago
Brigham and Women's shuffled me around, and then no one asked my about my insurance, which lead to my accruing a sizable medical debt. My story: I went to a regular checkup - which I would obviously have avoided had I been better informed of the consequences - in December. When I arrived to the Fish Center, I discovered that my PCP had changed offices to the main campus. They had left me a reminder for the appointment VM, which made no note of the change in address, but did contain the new address. I didn't notice because I've been going there for years and didn't even know the address of the Fish Center. I ended up having to quickly drive to the new location and was late for my appointment. When I arrived in the office, no one asked me about my insurance, and I was flustered, so I forgot to mention I had a new healthcare plan. On the way out I waited while the front desk was busy until someone nonchalantly looked my way and said "Oh, you're free to go." A few months later, I received a large bill from Brigham because Tufts apparently no longer cover their services. Tufts Health Plan used to cover Brigham and Women's in Boston, but renegotiated within the past few years, which was a huge surprise to me, because when I signed up for Tufts through MA Health, I had googled which hospitals it covers and on the Tufts Website they provide a PDF list that includes Brigham and Women's. Basically, I'm one of the ones who has fallen through the cracks in a complicated system. With a bit more attentiveness on the part of Brigham, I would have avoided the huge debt with which I am now sitting. All of this for a basic yearly checkup and a few blood tests that I didn't even want run, but which my doctor recommended.
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Sahaj Gupta
2 months ago
listener much about this place ... and plzz... if u have cmplaints they sort it out ... its not lke they hate us or they want to be offended ! they are working good for the sake guys ! anyway.. good place and world class facilities
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Dawn S
6 months ago
My father was brought to Brigham and Women's after a low speed motorcycle accident. Due to a brain bleed. Unfortunately after the initial care we felt almost forgot. Several times he was suppose to have diagnostic testing which was pushed back DAYS because of other emergencies. No one kept you appraised of delays. My family wanted to speak with a doctor, as we hadn't seen one in 3 days and a resident was sent down who was unable to answer any questions.
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Patricia Mcsween
5 months ago
Not enough words to express my feeling I have all my healthcare at B&W for years never had a problem that is the only place for me God bless all my healthcare worker you are all winners