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Brigham and Women's Hospital
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Boston is home to some of the best hospitals in the country. Yet, sometimes finding the best care can still get tricky—particularly if you’re looking for a psychologist. Where do you start? What do you do? To whom should you turn? Ash Nadkarni, M.D., a psychiatrist at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, spoke with Boston.com about the key things you should consider when seeking the right physician for your mental health needs.
When it comes to medical care, we’re lucky here in Boston. The city is home to some of the best hospitals in the country. And yet, sometimes finding the best care can still get tricky—particularly if you’re looking for a psychologist: someone in whom you can confide, divulging your deepest insecurities and your darkest fears. …
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When Jim Gass suffered a stroke in 2009, it was clear that standard rehabilitation would not repair the damage. Unwilling to accept life in a wheelchair, Gass decided his only option was to fly overseas for experimental stem cell treatment. What happened to Gass next is a cautionary tale for other patients seeking unproven and unregulated treatments through “stem cell tourism”. Aaron Berkowitz, MD, PhD, and Director of Global Neurology Program at Brigham and Women’s Hospital spoke with The Boston Globe to warn others of the outcomes they could face.
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Claire Twark, MD, a third-year resident in the BWH Department of Psychiatry who is interested in general adult psychiatry, sports psychiatry and addiction psychiatry, shares her thoughts on wellness and tips on nutrition.
Next Generation is a BWH Clinical & Research News (CRN) column penned by students, residents, fellows and postdocs. This month’s column is written by Claire Twark, MD, a third-year resident in …
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This ALS Awareness Day, the Ann Romney Center for Neurologic Diseases recognizes the patients, families and support networks confronting ‪#‎ALS‬. In this video, Howard L. Weiner, MD, and co-director of the Ann Romney Center for Neurologic Diseases at BWH, shares information about pioneering ALS research at the center. Researchers have been able to identify a connection between certain brain cells and the progression of ALS, leading to promising work on a new drug that could assist in the treatment of ALS progression. Clinical trials are expected to begin within the next year. ‪#‎50MillionFaces‬ ‪#‎ALSAwarenessDay‬
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Chances are you have at least one friend, coworker, or cousin—or maybe it's you?—who's obsessed with a Fitbit and reaching that coveted 10,000-step mark every day. But tracking your steps isn't all it's good for. These wearable devices can potentially clue you in to much more about your health than your walking habits. Aaron Aday, MD, a cardiology fellow at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, spoke with Prevention Magazine about instances where a Fitbit could inform the user about a health issue they did not know existed.
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According to MedlinePlus, back pain is one of the most common medical problems, affecting 8 out of 10 people at some point during their lives. Managing back pain can be challenging, because it is non-specific and may be the result of many different conditions. Jason Yong, MD, MBA, and an anesthesiologist and pain management specialist in the Comprehensive Spine Center at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, offers some guidance for people suffering from back pain.
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"A lot of the focus of end-of-life care is on cancer, but most people don't die of cancer. Our findings show that the quality of end-of-life care for other illnesses is not as good," says Melissa Wachterman, MD in this CNN article about her new research study. Her study found that a patient's illness, race and ethnicity can significantly influence how much care patients receive in their final days and how satisfied their family members may be with that care. The families of patients with cancer or dementia tend to be more satisfied with the quality of end-of-life care received than the families of patients with organ failure or frailty, according to the study.
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Over the past two years, 46-year-old Mark Rolon has endured intense chemotherapy treatment for a rare blood disorder and dramatic complications. In December of last year, a Brigham and Women’s doctor, together with scientist at Draper Lab, approached Rolon with the opportunity to participate in a study that would explore whether a new breath testing device that may eventually get patients like him on the right treatment program, will help patients get better, faster. The study was developed by Sophia Koo, MD, who specializes in infectious diseases at Brigham and Women’s Hospital. Koo and her patient spoke with The Boston Globe to discuss the implications of the study and the potential for the device in the diagnosis and treatment of respiratory disorders.
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Reisa Sperling, MD, a neurologist and researcher at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, is leading a nation-wide study designed to stop Alzheimer’s disease before symptoms start. This morning, she spoke with The Today Show about the goals of this research project, which will be measured by monitoring patients’ cognitive skills and the accumulation of amyloid buildup in the brain in order to see if the drug they’re testing has an impact on preventing the onset of Alzheimer’s symptoms. "We want to help people live their lives with dignity and end their lives ballroom dancing, instead of in nursing homes," Sperling said. ‪#‎50MillionFaces‬
Alzheimer's Disease affects over five million Americans — and according to the Alzheimer's Association, every 66 seconds someone in the U.S. develops the disease.
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David Cusack has battled a lot of serious health problems in the past 79 years. But even he had doubts whether he could survive a tick bite. Cusack was diagnosed with babesiosis – a rare disease from a tick bite. The majority of ticks infected with babesiosis, and other tick-borne disease, used to be found almost exclusively on Cape Cod and the Islands. Today, it is not uncommon for doctors to diagnose cases in Middlesex and Essex counties, as well as the South Shore. Cusack’s physician, Paul Sax, MD, clinical director for the Division of Infectious Disease at Brigham and Women’s Hospital spoke with WCVB Channel 5 Boston about warning signs you should be aware of this summer as you venture outside.
Massachusetts officials are tracking the tick-borne diseases closely, and finding that several diseases are becoming more common.
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A former running back for the Boston College Eagles, Earl Strong, Exterior Operations Supervisor of BWH Security and Parking, doesn’t expect to put his football skills to use on the job, but they came in handy when he tackled an alleged fugitive on May 25. Strong, who has worked at BWH for the past 17 years, said he was glad that he was able to help Boston Police Department (Official) detain a person who could have injured others in his attempt to flee. “BWH Security and Boston Police are always working together to keep BWH and the surrounding community safe,” he said.
A former running back for the Boston College Eagles, Earl Strong doesn’t expect to put his football skills to use on the job, but they came in handy when he tackled an alleged fugitive on May 25. S…
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New England Revolution player, Charlie Davies and wife Nina welcomed twin sons Rhys and Dakota back on March 17th. The twins, who were born three months early and weighed less than 3 pounds each have been receiving care at BWH’s neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). When Davies hasn't been practicing or playing, he has been at the hospital along with Nina. Saima Aftab, MD, who works in the department of newborn medicine at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, has been with the family every step of the way.Emily Riemer WCVB shares this story about their journey as they await a very special homecoming and ‪#‎FathersDay‬.
It's been a roller coaster few months for New England Revolution forward Charlie Davies and his wife, Nina.
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75 Francis St Boston, MA 02115
75 Francis StreetUSMassachusettsBoston02115
(617) 732-5500brighamandwomens.org
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Boston’s Brigham and Women’s Hospital (BWH) is an international leader in virtually every area of medicine and has been the site of pioneering breakthroughs that have improved lives around the world. A major teaching hospital of Harvard Medical School, BWH has a legacy of excellence that continues to grow year after year. Brigham and Women’s Health Care – the parent corporation for Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Brigham and Women’s Faulkner Hospital and the Brigham and Women’s Physician Organization – includes 150 outpatient practices with over 1,200 physicians. We serve patients from New England, throughout the United States, and from 120 countries around the world.
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4.0
73 reviews
5 star
43 reviews
4 star
12 reviews
3 star
3 reviews
2 star
2 reviews
1 star
13 reviews
"BWH Pathology Department is one of the most renowned around the globe."
"They need to work on sexual harassment training."
"My dad had a full heart transplant."
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Delaney Bannister
in the last week
Brigham and Women's shuffled me around, and then no one asked my about my insurance, which lead to my accruing a sizable medical debt. My story: I went to a regular checkup - which I would obviously have avoided had I been better informed of the consequences - in December. When I arrived to the Fish Center, I discovered that my PCP had changed offices to the main campus. They had left me a reminder for the appointment VM, which made no note of the change in address, but did contain the new address. I didn't notice because I've been going there for years and didn't even know the address of the Fish Center. I ended up having to quickly drive to the new location and was late for my appointment. When I arrived in the office, no one asked me about my insurance, and I was flustered, so I forgot to mention I had a new healthcare plan. On the way out I waited while the front desk was busy until someone nonchalantly looked my way and said "Oh, you're free to go." A few months later, I received a large bill from Brigham because Tufts apparently no longer cover their services. Tufts Health Plan used to cover Brigham and Women's in Boston, but renegotiated within the past few years, which was a huge surprise to me, because when I signed up for Tufts through MA Health, I had googled which hospitals it covers and on the Tufts Website they provide a PDF list that includes Brigham and Women's. Basically, I'm one of the ones who has fallen through the cracks in a complicated system. With a bit more attentiveness on the part of Brigham, I would have avoided the huge debt with which I am now sitting. All of this for a basic yearly checkup and a few blood tests that I didn't even want run, but which my doctor recommended.
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Sahaj Gupta
a month ago
listener much about this place ... and plzz... if u have cmplaints they sort it out ... its not lke they hate us or they want to be offended ! they are working good for the sake guys ! anyway.. good place and world class facilities
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Helen ODonnell
3 months ago
I was admitted after a a stroke. This is the noisiest hospital. I don't think I got any sleep for the entire week I was there. I was woken up repeatedly to someone screaming in my face. "Suzy, blink if you can hear me." Since my name is not Suzy, I finally got it together to scream that back at her, and she said, "Oh I made that mistake before." Then why doesn't she check the name on the bracelet, or the name above the bed before she screams at patients and wakes them up? Meanwhile, I was extremely concerned to let my daughter and relatives know that I was there, as well as my employer and students who were waiting for me. They kept insisting that everyone had been contacted and no one was worried about me or wondering where I was. Only days later did I find out that my daughter, who is from out of state, was desperately searching for me, and six people including my daughter, cousin and employer had all called in wellness checks on me to the local police dept. B&W had insisted that this was all covered and they clearly didn't do anything to reach my family or employer. They even told my cousin, she was going to have to try calling the other Boston hospitals. I esent enormously that it put a lot of people through hell when I was trying as hard as I could, as a patient with a stroke, to reach them. Then, last week, they sent me someone else's pocketbook stuffed with ID's, including medical ID's, bills and cash. I feel terrible for this person, who must be worried about her things. They sent me a shipping label to return it to them, and now UPS expects me to give them a check on pickup. I've had a stroke. B&W is an excellent hospital. but they're exhausting and unprofessional to deal with.
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Mary Richard
7 months ago
My care through a hip surgery was excellent from beginning to end. I went from a VAMC clinic in another state, to B&WH, for evaluation, then due to red tape, much later to have pre op, then finally surgery & post op, & every single bit of it was excellent. I fact, I am considering moving to Boston, because of my care there. I am a polytrauma veteran, with many physical limitations & financial constraints, so a move for me is a very difficult process, & there are many obstacles, but I will do it if I can because my care was so excellent.
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Katie Snow
3 weeks ago
Coming from a small town in Maine to such a big city hospital I was expecting my mother to be treated more like just another patient, rather than an actual person. The entire staff here treated her with such care and humility. What started out as a horrible, traumatic experience turned out to be not so bad.
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Michael Thompson
3 months ago
They need to work on sexual harassment training. Hospital Security Very unprofessional. I am very well behaved and attractive heterosexual male. They were harassing me by attempting to intimidate me: staring at me, positioning themselves in my line of sight, walking too close to me, etc... ER Several times now, male employees (Techs, Nurses, etc...) have abused their power and been very rude to me, including attempting to bully me to impress female staff members. Not a very welcoming place if the males feel that the females find you sexually attractive. THIS IS SEXUAL HARASSMENT.
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Dawn S
5 months ago
My father was brought to Brigham and Women's after a low speed motorcycle accident. Due to a brain bleed. Unfortunately after the initial care we felt almost forgot. Several times he was suppose to have diagnostic testing which was pushed back DAYS because of other emergencies. No one kept you appraised of delays. My family wanted to speak with a doctor, as we hadn't seen one in 3 days and a resident was sent down who was unable to answer any questions.
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Patricia Mcsween
4 months ago
Not enough words to express my feeling I have all my healthcare at B&W for years never had a problem that is the only place for me God bless all my healthcare worker you are all winners