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Brigham and Women's Hospital
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Brigham and Women's Hospital is world-renowned in virtually every area of adult medicine. As a teaching hospital of Harvard Medical School, our leadership in patient quality and safety, development of state-of-the-art treatments and technologies, and robust research programs have improved the health of people around the world.
Brigham and Women's Hospital is world-renowned in virtually every area of adult medicine. As a teaching hospital of Harvard Medical School, our leadership in patient quality and safety, development of state-of-the-art treatments and technologies, and robust research programs have improved the health of people around the world.

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Approximately one in five Americans over the age of 60 have peripheral arterial disease (PAD) – a condition caused by narrowing of the peripheral arteries that supply blood that is rich in oxygen and other essential nutrients to the legs, stomach, arms, and head. “One of the most important interventions for PAD is lifestyle modifications to prevent the acceleration of atherosclerosis – the process which causes the build-up of plaque in the arteries that limits blood flow,” explains C. Keith Ozaki, MD, a vascular surgeon at Brigham and Women’s Hospital. In this #BrighamHealth Hub blog post learn more about PAD and the simple, preventative measures you can take as a patient.
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According to the CDC, in 2015 alone, approximately 11,000 Americans died of overdoses of prescription opioids. “These are addictive medications,” Brian Bateman, chief of obstetric anesthesia at Brigham and Women’s Hospital told the Washington Post. “For some patients, being exposed, even in the setting of appropriate treatment for pain, may precipitate an affinity for the drug that leads to subsequent chronic use and even abuse.” #OpioidEpidemic
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Looking after patients' mental and behavioral health needs at the doctor's office is one of the many ways that hospitals are embracing the concept of population health. So far, the early data shows that proactive monitoring and coordination is working, with a 20 percent lower rate of hospitalization where it's been implemented. Learn how Brigham Health is integrating this emerging concept into how they practice patient care in this U.S. News and World Report feature. #PopulationHealth
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September is #SepsisAwarenessMonth. Sepsis is a life-threatening condition where early detection and treatment are key. To learn more about risk factors, symptoms, and treatment, please visit: http://bit.ly/2jtiNqD
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“These days, there’s such a focus on protein and healthy fats and avoiding carbs at all costs (including sugar, which is, of course, a carb). However, carbs are actually good—and necessary!—if you exercise regularly, particularly for endurance workouts,” said Melissa Majumdar, R.D., a registered dietitian who specializes in sports nutrition at Brigham and Women's Hospital. Learn more about the best ways you can fuel your body for various activity levels in this blog post from Greatist.  
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A surprising 70 to 80 percent of all women develop uterine fibroids, benign growths in the muscle of the uterus, at some point in their lives. While most women with uterine fibroids do not experience symptoms, some women suffer from severe symptoms that can be relieved with treatment. “While the exact cause of uterine fibroids isn’t certain, it is generally believed that hormones play a key role,” explains Mobolaji Ajao, MD, a specialist in the Division of Minimally Invasive Gynecologic Surgery at Brigham and Women’s Hospital (BWH). “They also seem to be more prevalent in certain families, so there is a genetic component as well.”
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It is estimated that exercise-induced anaphylaxis affects 50 in every 100,000 people. While awareness of the condition among allergists has gone up, researchers and doctors still don’t know exactly why it occurs, Maria Castells, MD, an allergist at Brigham and Women’s Hospital. Learn more in this Popular Science feature.
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Research from Brigham and Women's Hospital finds that timing meals relative to your own body clock, rather than to the time of day, may affect how lean you are. The impact of a person’s biological clock - independent of the time of day - has not been tested until now, Andrew McHill, PhD of Brigham and Women’s Hospital told Reuters. “Our findings could be considered a reason not to eat right before going to sleep, but they’re also a reason not to eat later in the evening, even if you are planning to go to bed at a later time,” McHill said.
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A new study out Brigham and Women's Hospital finds women who took hormone replacement therapy (HRT) back in the 1990s for treatment of #menopause are not more likely to die decades later than women who were given sugar pills. Many women who were taking HRT opted to stop after learning that HRT could potentially raise one's risk of breast cancer and stroke. Learn more about the new findings from study leader JoAnn Manson, MD, DrPH in her interview with TIME. 
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Are children too young to take allergy medicines? Is your cat or dog hypoallergenic? Learn the top five myths about allergies in the latest issue of Brigham Health magazine.
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