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Booko
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Booko finds the cheapest place to buy books and DVDs
Booko finds the cheapest place to buy books and DVDs

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New logo, for a new design.
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We've listened to our users' feedback and we've acted on it. We're very excited to launch the new look booko.com.au on 27th May! That's just 10 days away. If you can't wait that long and would like a sneak peek, you can take a look at Booko UK by clicking on the Union Jack in the top right-hand corner of Booko. #newlookbooko
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Great interview with Christos Tsiolkas on ABC Radio with Richard Fidler

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Reading so-called literary fiction can temporarily increase someone's capacity for empathy, according to a study (http://www.newschool.edu/pressroom/pressreleases/2013/CastanoKidd.htm) by David Kidd and Emanuele Castano published Thursday in the journal Science. Castano told NPR by email, "Our effects are probably short-lived, few hours to a day or two, I would say. But of course repeated exposure to literary fiction, and thus to this 'exercise' in mind-reading and mind-construction, can lead to more long-term, chronic effects." The authors distinguished between "literary fiction" — books written by award-winning authors including Jesmyn Ward, Don DeLillo, Anton Chekhov, Louise Erdrich, Tea Obreht and others; "popular fiction" — books by bestsellers including Danielle Steel and Gillian Flynn; and nonfiction works from Smithsonian Magazine. In an email exchange, the study's authors acknowledged that the boundary between "literary" and "popular" fiction can be blurry. But they say they "consider popular fiction to be more concerned with the plot than the characters. The characters themselves, we'd argue, tend to be more stereotyped, coherent, 'fully accounted for. Literary fiction focuses less on the plot, and more on the mental life of the characters, who are often "incomplete;" hence the need for the reader to make an effort to infer what their intentions, emotions, thoughts, motivations are." Ward, whose novel Salvage the Bones was among the works that researchers found boosted emotional intelligence, said in a phone interview with NPR: "If that's true, then that's exactly what I want to happen when I write. Part of the reason that I write about what I write about is that the people I grew up with, poor people and black people, are underrepresented in fiction. So it's amazing to me that a study like this shows that people are seeing these characters and can empathize with them and sympathize with them. It makes me feel like what I'm trying to do is working." (Source: http://kunc.org/post/book-news-study-says-reading-literary-fiction-can-boost-social-skills)

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Want to find the best deal for that book or DVD you want to buy? Booko makes it easy by looking it up in 50+ online stores around the world, converting the price to your currency and calculating postage right to your door!

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Not sure what to read next? Or just finished a book you can't wait to tell other people about? This is a community for you!

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Know the feeling?
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