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I've been using google drive this year for student submissions of article summaries. I love the comment system as a way to actually have a conversation with students about their writing. I also love that I don't have a pile of papers cluttering up my desk.
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Kara Papa's profile photoColleen Lloyd's profile photoEdison Vinicius Heberle Guimarães's profile photo
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Thank you for sharing about Classroom--I have all my classes on Google Sites, will look into this.  Could someone address the errors on http://biologycorner.com/worksheets/measuring_with_microscope.html  The scanning shows 4mm or at least 3.8mm, not 3, and it says the low power is 2mm, then all calculations are based on it being 1mm.  Thank You.
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Students are the best editors. I've made some slight changes to the cystic fibrosis case study just to clarify a few things and to address the fact that none of my students had any idea what the disease was or whether you could die from it, so I added a life expectancy chart. One of the questions has us stumped though.

7. Sweat glands cool the body by releasing perspiration (sweat) from the lower layers of the skin onto the surface. Sodium and chloride (salt) help carry water to the skin's surface and are then reabsorbed into the body. Why does a person with cystic fibrosis have salty tasting skin?

The answer was intended to be that the cells could not reabsorb the salt. The question one group had was how the salt got there in the first space. If the channels don't let Cl pass (no reabsorption) how is it being secreted from the cells in the first place in sweat. I've searched on google and haven't found an answer so thought maybe someone here could explain this one. http://www.biologycorner.com/worksheets/case_study_cystic_fibrosis.html
A Case of Cystic Fibrosis baby. Dr. Weyland examined a six month old infant that had been admitted to University Hospital earlier in the day. The baby's parents had brought young Zoey to the emergency room because she had been suffering from a chronic cough. In addition, they said that Zoey ...
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Mark Lasbury's profile photoBiologyCorner's profile photoprecious diamond's profile photoCorina Rahmig's profile photo
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+BiologyCorner i'm also a medical student and i want to know theory behind this topic . will you help me please ? 
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To move away from lecture-based instruction, I've been adding a lot of case studies to units, most are acquired from the National Center for Case Study Teaching in Science. For the cell unit, I made my own case study which focuses on cystic fibrosis and how it is caused by a malfunction in the cell membrane. This will be followed up by articles on Gaucher disease and mitochondrial disorders. The goal is that instead of presenting a very dry lecture on all the parts of the cell, we will be looking at how malfunctions in these parts lead to disorders. http://www.biologycorner.com/worksheets/case_study_cystic_fibrosis.html
A Case of Cystic Fibrosis baby. Dr. Weyland examined a six month old infant that had been admitted to University Hospital earlier in the day. The baby's parents had brought young Zoey to the emergency room because she had been suffering from a chronic cough. In addition, they said that Zoey ...
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BiologyCorner's profile photoLiz Hicks's profile photoFarjana Yasmin's profile photoJessica Robitaille's profile photo
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+Kara Papa I do like the slide case studies, less paper to copy!
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BiologyCorner

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Painted turtle, taken with underwater camera.  So far, I'm happy with my new aquarium filter and the new camera!  
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Gary Ray R's profile photoMike Williams's profile photo
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Nice picture.
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BiologyCorner

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In trying to align my curriculum to the Next Generation Science Standards, I'm focusing on this standard for my anatomy class: 

HS-LS1-3 Plan and conduct an investigation to provide evidence that feedback mechanisms maintain homeostasis.

I haven't yet figured out how to design a lesson around the planning and conducting of an experiment, but at the very least I've added information regarding feedback loops to the introductory lessons on homeostasis. Lecture notes and powerpoints reflect this change as well as a short graphic showing how the pancreas regulates blood sugar levels. 

Anyone have any ideas of the investigation part of this standard (for a human anatomy class)?

http://www.biologycorner.com/worksheets/feedback_loops.html
The control of blood sugar (glucose) by insulin is a good example of a negative feedback mechanism. When blood sugar rises, receptors in the body sense a change . In turn, the control center (pancreas) secretes insulin into the blood effectively lowering blood sugar levels. Once blood sugar levels reach homeostasis, the pancreas stops releasing insulin.
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Mike Williams's profile photoBiologyCorner's profile photoMuhammad Basim Kakakhail's profile photoInduwara Wishwakith's profile photo
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Some good ideas to chew on.   +Mike Williams , I might actually use that document.   If students get a sense for how those changes are measured, then maybe they can design an experiment to measure other feedback loops like the ones +Gary Ray R linked.  

Ghrellin and Leptin work like insulin and glucagon.  Ghrellin levels raise when you're hungry and leptin reduces your appetite after you've eaten (simple explanation.)  Students could design an experiment that would measure the levels of these hormones in the blood.  

*Funfact:  leptin insensitivity has been linked to obesity.
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My first lab this year was intended as a pre-assessment to determine how much my students already  knew about the scientific method.  Students were asked to identify a mystery powder and use evidence to support their claim (common core objective).   They didn't do too bad, but many lacked a systematic approach.   They struggled when I asked them to write a procedural  (step-by-step) lab that would be used with younger students to identify the mystery substance. 
Students are given an open-ended activity and asked to solve a problem. As a group, they determine the identity of a mystery substance, write a summary statement that uses evidence to support their claim (answer) and develop a procedural lab for middle school science students.
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Kevin Brady's profile photoKara Papa's profile photoHolly Elliott's profile photoBiologyCorner's profile photo
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+Holly Elliott , these are high school seniors, but you could modify if for younger kids.  My unknowns were a mix, I'd probably just make them a single unknown for 8th graders.  The real goal is to get them to JUSTIFY their answers.  Identifying the unknown is easy, telling me how they identified it and creating instructions is the hard part.
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Check out this virtual lab on lizard evolution. Students complete tasks and then print out a page that shows that each section has been completed. This might be a nice alternative to other virtual labs I've done in the past, though it seems like students may need a large chunk of time to complete.

Other Evolution Investigations:

Peppered Moth Simulation http://biologycorner.com/worksheets/pepperedmoth.html
Sex and the Single Guppy: http://www.biologycorner.com/worksheets/sex-selection.html
Natural Selection with Bunnies: http://bit.ly/PHETbunny
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Like your site
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Do your students carry their phones everywhere, snapping photos and selfies to chronicle almost every moment of their day? While the older generation might find this behavior disturbing, there is another way to interpret it: http://huff.to/1CypNzS

"The 'Instagram Generation' now experiences the present as an anticipated memory" -Professor Daniel Kahneman. 

This is what my class looks like on snake feeding day.
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Mike Williams's profile photoremzsti's profile photoAnnette Weber-F's profile photoBlake Hartley's profile photo
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if kids are going to use them no mater what u tell them. Try using it as a tool make them take there phone out an use them to do work. Use them to take a quiz. The first person to text in the right gets a prize etc. Use the distraction of the phone against them. Turn it into something constructive. Have them find info on school websites. Connect with students for education.
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BiologyCorner

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Not all models need to be high tech....
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BiologyCorner's profile photoChantel Dooley's profile photoInduwara Wishwakith's profile photoArun A's profile photo
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Good idea, +Javier Chiappa !
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Biologycorner is having a few technical difficulties today. I guess the good news is that I have more traffic,  so we're moving to a bigger server!   
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In biology are we going to talk about animals.
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This guide would have come in handy this summer when I was trying to identify a riverfront butterfly. I do believe I found a pipevine swallowtail.  Source:  http://tabletopwhale.com/index.html 
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kazha dara's profile photoAustin ES STEM's profile photokanakaraj krishnamoorthy's profile photosuryakant bhalekar's profile photo
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Beautiful illustration of butterflies of NA, in fact that site, Tabletop Whale, has other scientific illustrations that are just as well done.
Nice find, thanks +BiologyCorner 
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BiologyCorner

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I had the opportunity to join a webseminar presented by the  +National Science Teachers Association  that discussed writing in science. A major theme of this seminar was scaffolding. If you plan to include more writing in your science class, I've attempted to summarize what I learned in the seminar and included some links to NSTA resources that are free for download.
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Resources for students and teachers of biology and the life sciences.
Introduction
The Biology Corner is a website I started in 2000, over the years I have added content and resources I have used in my biology classes.  Teachers and students alike can find help with concepts, images, and practice quizzes for all major biological topics.  I also include photos of anatomy, mainly from classroom dissections and human models I have in the classroom.