Profile cover photo
Profile photo
Audubon Nature Institute
963 followers
963 followers
About
Audubon Nature Institute's posts

Post has shared content
Pandas consume anywhere from 20 to 40 pounds of bamboo each day to get all their nutrients

A giant panda’s digestive system resembles that of a carnivore more than an herbivore – so much of what is eaten is passed as waste. To obtain this much food means that a panda must spend 10 to 16 hours a day foraging and eating! The rest of their time is usually spent sleeping and resting.

#ZAPandas
Photo

Post has attachment
Pine Snake Progress
Three cheers for the Louisiana pine snake (Pituophis ruthveni)! Considered one of the rarest snakes in North America, it is almost never seen in the wild. Non-venomous, they consume rodents, small birds and eggs, and amphibians. While you may not be able to see them in the wild, there is a pine snake on exhibit in the Reptile Encounter at the Zoo. Audubon participates in the pine snake management program, where animal experts are putting great resources behind making sure these beautiful and beneficial snakes do not become extinct
Photo

Post has attachment
Whooper News
Wild whooping cranes in Louisiana have produced an egg for the first time since 1939. While the egg would prove to be unviable, it’s still a significant step in bringing wild whooping crane populations back to Louisiana. You can visit Audubon Zoo’s whooping crane pair in the exhibit near the Zoo entrance across from flamingos. They are large, beautiful birds sure to impress. Here’s hoping their Louisiana comeback in the wild is just around the corner.
Photo

Post has attachment
Photo

Post has attachment
Long, strange trip
Several hundred butterflies are at home at Audubon Butterfly Garden and Insectarium on any given day. Their journey to this wonderful spot begins in tropical parts of the world when they are caterpillars. Once they become pupae, they are sent to New Orleans, where Audubon experts arrange them just as they would be positioned in nature. About a week later, the beautiful butterflies you see in the Butterfly Garden emerge. Isn’t today a good day to check them out? We hope you visit Audubon Butterfly Garden and Insectarium soon.
Photo

Post has attachment
Living fossils?
It’s a dinosaur summer, but you don’t have to go to the movies to see a creature from 75 million years ago. Check out the paddlefish (Polyodon spathula) at Audubon Aquarium of the Americas. It’s believed today’s paddlefish are virtually unchanged from their Late Cretaceous period ancestors, earning them the name “primitive fish.” Populations are declining dramatically, but paddlefish propagation protocol seems to be improving. Spend a warm summer afternoon with these cool fish at the Aquarium soon.
Photo courtesy US Fish and Wildlife Service
Photo

Post has attachment
#TBT to when we had baby capybaras! Not much is cuter than two little baby capybaras snuggling, wouldn’t you agree?!
Photo

Post has attachment
Fleeting Jellies
Don’t wait too long to check out the Blubber Jellyfish (Catostylus mosaicus) at Audubon Aquarium of the Americas, as they’ll only be on display for another few weeks. With beautiful colorations, Blubbers are among the few jellyfish that are commercially viable. Many Asian countries consider dried Blubbers to be fine cuisine!
Photo

Post has attachment
Are You Blue?
Blue morpho butterflies are, in fact, not blue. They are brown. However, microscopic structures on the scales of their wings absorb all wavelengths of light except blue, which they reflect. This structural coloration, unlike a pigment, can be altered by changing how light hits the surface; if one moves a morpho wing into light hitting it at just the proper angle, the wing appears brown, which is its true color! See these beautiful butterflies at Audubon Butterfly Garden and Insectarium!
Photo

Post has attachment
Impressive Fangs
Check out the nursery window in Reptile Encounter. You’ll see one of three Gaboon vipers (Bitis gabonica) in Audubon Zoo’s collection. All three were born at Cincinnati Zoo two years ago. This is a beautiful snake with the distinguishing characteristic of having fangs up to two inches long! Primarily nocturnal, these snakes are native to Africa’s rainforests and are known to strike quickly when prey animals like rodents or birds have the misfortune to happen by.
Photo
Wait while more posts are being loaded